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Linux Overclocking Software

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Software

Since its inception, NVClock has evolved quite a bit. At this time there is not only the command-line interface but also GTK and Qt versions. The latest version of NVClock (v0.8 Beta 2) as well as the CVS version support overclocking the NV GPU core and video memory. Other features include card information, OpenGL/display settings, hardware monitoring of both fan speeds and die temperatures, fan speed control, pipeline modding (GeForce 6 series), and PCI id modding.

Top 10 Killer Apps For Linux

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Nobody wants to use an operating system. They just want it be able to run the software they need. Therefore, its very important for an OS to have killer apps. Here’s a list of software that make Linux worth using.

CMS pros and cons

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We know there’s some of you still confused about all the CMS babble spreading around the web, so we thought it’d be a good idea to put together the top 10 pros and cons web designers should take into consideration when pondering on whether or not using a CMS app.

Why Flash 9 for Linux is taking so long

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Adobe skipped a version of Flash for Linux and released stable versions of the Flash 9 player for Windows and Mac OS X long before the beta of Flash 9 to Linux users. Paul Betlem, senior director of engineering for Adobe, explained why the process is taking so long.

Xen GUI In Fedora Core 6

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The new version (6) of Fedora Core, which became available for download in November, shows that major Linux vendors see the importance of virtualisation and virtual private servers in years to come. Xen in Fedora Core 6 comes with a GUI named Virtual Machine Manager.

WordPerfect to support both ODF and Open XML

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Corel Corp. promised months ago that it would support the OpenOffice.org ODF (Open Document Format). Now, we know it will support both ODF and Microsoft's Open XML next year.

Test-driving Adobe's Flash Player 9 beta

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The stable Flash Player plugin for Linux is crusty old version 7 -- trailing more than two calendar years, two major revisions, and one corporate buyout behind the Windows and Mac offerings. But now Adobe has finally unveiled a beta release of Flash Player 9 for Linux. Was it worth the wait? And should you install it now, or hold off a little longer for the official, stable product instead?

Linux Tool Highlight: Desktop Data Manager

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I found this great utility for Gnome that I just can’t keep as a secret! Smile It is called the Desktop Data Manager and includes “a clipboard history for many different types of content” like text and images that sits in your notification area (system tray), and an application to take screenshots of a single window, a region of the screen, or the whole desktop. Being able to select the region of the screen is VERY important to me and it’s a huge time-saver.

Novell abandons open source Exchange competitor

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Novell has axed support for the Hula open source collaboration suite for email, calendaring and contact lists.

It's Alive!!

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Make-live is a brilliant new method of making stuff live without all that messing around in hyperspace. (<-- non-sequitur HHGTG reference. Sorry) Or, to put it another way, make-live is a brilliant new method for creating a zombie army of flesh-eating slaves.

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Chromixium – An Ubuntu Based Google’s Chrome OS Clone

Today, We have come up with an interesting news for both Ubuntu and Chrome OS users. Meet Chromixium – the new modern desktop operating system based on Ubuntu that has the functionality, look and feel of Google’s “Chrome OS”. Chromixium has brought the elegant simplicity of Chromebook and flexibility and stability of Ubuntu together. Chromixium puts the web front and center of the user experience. Web and Chrome apps work straight out of the browser to connect you to all your personal, work and education networks. Sign into Chromium to sync all your apps and bookmarks. When you are offline or when you need more power, you can install any number of applications for work or play, including LibreOffice, Skype, Steam and a whole lot more. Security updates are installed seamlessly and effortlessly in the background and will be supplied until 2019. You can install Chromixium in place of any existing operating system, or alongside Windows or Linux. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start

The first 'production' smartphone running the Ubuntu operating system is finally here. Designed and marketed by the Spanish company BQ (not to be confused with the Chinese company BQ Mobile) and made in China, the first Ubuntu Phone is based on the 4.5-inch BQ Aquaris E4.5, which normally ships with Android 4.4. Included with the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition are two copies of the quick-start guide (in four languages each, one of the eight being English), a charger (with a built-in two-pin continental mains plug) and a 1-metre USB-to-Micro-USB cable. A comprehensive User Manual is available for download from the BQ website. The list price for the Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition, which is only available in the EU, is €169.90 (~£125). Read more Also: Ubuntu and Windows set to contest desktop/smartphone hybrid market Ubuntu phone that works as a desktop PC coming in 2015

Enabling Open Source SDN and NFV in the Enterprise

I recently attended the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in Shenzhen, China, to promote Intel’s software defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) software solutions. During this year’s IDF, Intel has made several announcements and our CEO Brian Krzanich showcased Intel’s innovation leadership across a wide range of technologies with our local partners in China. On the heel of Krzanich’s announcements, Intel Software & Services Group Senior VP Doug Fisher extended Krzanich’s message to stress the importance of open source collaboration to drive industry innovation and transformation, citing OpenStack and Hadoop as prime examples. Read more Also: Myth-Busting the Open-Source Cloud Part 2