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Software

The Flock Experience

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Software

techzone: I just came across a new web browser Flock. and found it to be amazing.
It is optimized for media, blogging and much more. In fact I am writing this blog from the inbuilt editor of Flock itself.

Why isn't Xfce's layout easier to change?

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beranger: I might have irrational expectations, but once you can change the layout of some desktop environment "the easy way" — i.e. by using the mouse, not by manually editing config files —, shouldn't you be able to experience some ease with that?

Learn and teach geometry and algebra with GeoGebra

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linux.com: GeoGebra, a GPL-licensed teaching and learning tool that integrates geometry, algebra, and calculus, benefits both teachers and students alike. GeoGebra constructs geometrical figures and demonstrates the relationship between geometry and algebra. GeoGebra can help you create interactive demonstrations and precise images of geometric figures for inclusion in teaching and testing materials.

Getting to know GNOME

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techrepublic: Linux has come a long way from the early, oft-crashing days. GNOME is now one of the primary desktops for the Linux operating system; not only is it highly customizable, but it is amazingly stable. Jack Wallen explains why Linux -- running GNOME -- is a viable desktop alternative.

AMD 8.42 Driver Brings Fixes, AIGLX!

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phoronix: Today it's now time where the fglrx driver reaches yet another milestone. Not only does today's release address many of the outstanding bugs for the earlier GPU generations while also introducing a few new features, but it also delivers AIGLX support! Yes, you read that right.

Free Finance Software for Windows & Linux

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Software

cybernet: Ever since we wrote about Mint, the free finance management site, we have received a few requests from those looking for good software to manage personal finances. I found exactly what I was looking for: Money Manager Ex. Not only is it free, but it is open source and available for both Windows and Linux!

Opera enters belly of the Valley

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iTWire: Norway's Opera Software, intends to build on the market niche it has carved for its increasingly popular Web browser by setting up an office in the heart of Silicon Valley. Opera's new Mountain View office puts the company in close proximity to some the most important global Web players, including Google and Yahoo.

Extending Nautilus context menus with Nautilus-actions

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linux.com: There are literally dozens of plugins and extensions for Nautilus, the default file manager on the GNOME desktop environment, but there is just one that allows you to customize the Nautilus context menu items. The Nautilus-actions extension enables you to add customized entries to the context menu such that, when you right-click a file, the context menu will show options specific to that file.

Your Linux Computer Can Support A Different Window Manager!

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blogs.pcworld.com: I love Linux. But many people are afraid to use a new operating system because they are so attached to Windows. They are scared of the possibility of having to use the command line! But there are window managers for the X Window System on Linux that can spread all of your programs out onto a desktop, just like Microsoft Windows.

Compiz 0.6.2 and Compiz Fusion 0.6.0 for openSUSE

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cyberorg: With the release of Compiz 0.6.2 a quickfix version of 0.6.0 release, Compiz Fusion community has followed it up with a release of Compiz Fusion 0.6.0. Packages for openSUSE 10.3 and 10.2 are, as always , available from X11:XGL Build service repository.

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.