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Software

Top Email Encryption Tools

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Software
Security

Email continues to be one of the most popular and useful functions of a Linux system. Being able to keep in touch with your friends, family, and colleagues is essential for any platform. As the scope of email threats keeps increasing, systems for email security and encryption have become more complex and more of a necessity. Protecting email from unauthorized access and inspection is important particularly because the protocols that govern email do not include encryption. Email was not designed with any privacy or security in mind. The consequence of the lack of security is that email can be compromised on the sender’s device, on a network, on a server, and on the recipient’s device.

Sending encrypted messages is one method of ensuring electronic privacy. By encrypting messages, this will help to keep your precious information safe by making messages look like garbled text to uninvited onlookers. Encrypting email may sound a little daunting, but it’s actually simple with the right software.

OpenPGP is the most widely used email encryption standard. Whether you are using an email client or a web-based email solution, you can encrypt your email with OpenPGP.

There are very few email applications that have PGP encryption enabled by default. Fortunately, there are some good open source encryption applications available for Linux that are simple to use.

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WhatIP – Graphical Tool to Tell Public / Local IP Address, Ports, Local Devices

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Software

Want to check your IP address, listening ports, or local network devices but hate Linux commands? Well, What IP is a simple graphical tool to do the job.

What IP is a free open-source tool written in Python 3 with GTK+ 3 framework.

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20+ Distraction-free Text Editors for Linux, Windows, macOS and The Cloud

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Software

While writing, it's essential to have a distraction-free environment. That will help the writer formulate his ideas into words.

Most of the text processor software and document editor programs are full of tools, customization options which make them distracting the writer, and they already take large portion of the screen.

Distraction-free editors are required by writers, screenwriters, novelists, researchers and journalists.

Distraction-free modes have several criteria that starts from minimal user-interface, full-screen mode, few tools in the user-interface and focus mode.

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Proprietary Software: Todoist, FreeOffice, and Even Worse

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Software
  • Todoist Takes on Trello with New Kanban Board Feature

    Todoist now has a Kanban board feature similar to that made popular by Trello.

    Kanban boards are an effective project management tool designed to make it easier to organise tasks within projects and get an overview of overall project status. While Kanban boards aren’t super fancy they are, for some, super useful.

    “A more visual way to organize your projects. Drag tasks between sections, visualize your progress, and simplify your teamwork,” Todoist say of the feature.

  • SoftMaker FreeOffice: A cross-platform Office suite that’s fully compatible to MS Office

    Most Linux users are well-acquainted with LibreOffice – many distributions have it pre-installed. Fewer know its powerful alternative: FreeOffice is a full-fledged office solution with full support for Microsoft Office file formats. It consists of a word processor, a spreadsheet and a presentation program. True to its name, FreeOffice is fully free and available for Linux in 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

    FreeOffice is far from a LibreOffice clone. The software is being developed by a German software company with a history going all the way back to 1987. Due to its background, FreeOffice has far more in common with Microsoft Office than with LibreOffice.

  • Cutting corners on cybersecurity can leave costly holes [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Such attacks can paralyse an organisation as it weighs up concerns over prolonged business interruption, reputational damage and data protection responsibilities against the financial impact and the ethical implications of capitulating to the demands. The decision to pay or not to pay is very much the question – especially when university budgets are so tight.

    The advice of the NCSC, as well as Jisc, is very clear: do not pay! A range of reasons are cited, but the prime one is the inability of institutions to be sure that the [attacker] will undo the damage and not exploit the data breach at a later date. Those who pay up justify doing so on the grounds of business criticality and expediency. They also rely on the “honour among thieves” paradigm that [attackers] will stick to their word so that victims of future attacks will also feel confident in paying up.

  • As critics call for deplatforming, defunding, and prosecution over Leila Khaled discussion, San Francisco State University president gets it right

    Yesterday, Zoom refused to allow the university to use its service for the discussion — a cancellation praised by FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr, who said there was no “need to hear both sides.” It is not yet clear whether the organizers of the event will switch to another channel of communication.

Collabora Online Development Edition 6.4 Office Suite Gets a Fresh Look, Many Improvements

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Software

Coming three months after version 4.2, CODE (Collabora Online Development Edition) 6.4 is a major release that adds many great features, including a new, modern look with the NotebookBar, which not only saves sp`ace, but it also makes the interface easier to use and intuitive, especially for those familiar with the MS Office suite.

The NotebookBar is set as default in this release and looks great with all core components, including Writer, Calc, and Impress. However, if users want to switch back to the classic interface, which won’t go away anytime soon, they can do that very easily by selecting ‘classic’ for the user_interface key in the loolwsd.xml file.

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Apostrophe – distraction free Markdown editor

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Software

Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

Apostrophe is a distraction free Markdown editor. It uses pandoc as backend for Markdown parsing and offers a very clean and sleek user interface.

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Announcing Istio 1.6.10

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Server
Software

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.9 and Istio 1.6.10.

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KTextEditor - Small Things Matter

Filed under
KDE
Software

Thanks to the feedback & patches provided by others, I found a bit more motivation to take a look at the small things that seems to be odd in KTextEditor.

Interesting enough, if you once notice a small detail (like a dead pixel on your display you suddenly find after years of use), it really sticks out like a sore thumb…

Here two small things that caught my interest this week.

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Microchip releases open source GUI kit for its SAMA5 and SAM9 chips

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Development
Hardware
Software

Microchip has introduced a free, open source “Ensemble Graphics Toolkit” running on Linux for building C++ based GUIs for its Cortex-A5 SAMA5 and Arm9 SAM9 SoCs.

Microchip has released a free, Apache 2.0 licensed C++ GUI suite for the Linux-powered, single-core, 32-bit SoCs it received from its acquisition of Atmel. The Ensemble Graphics Toolkit (EGT), which is now integrated with Microchip’s Linux4SAM distribution, is designed for Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs such as the SAMA5D27, which is found on its SAMA5D27 SOM SiP module. It also supports Arm9-based SAM9 SoCs such as the 600MHz SAM9X60 SoC that was announced in March.

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Secure your messaging with Dino: An End-to-End encryption chat client for Linux and macOS

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Software

Dino is a privacy-focused lightweight open-source messenger for Linux desktops.

It supports end-to-end encryption out-of-the-box via OMEMO or OpenPGP encryption.

In addition to its strong encryption, Dino allows the user to disable read and typing notification either globally or for specific contacts.

Currently, Dino offers several distribution packages for all popular Linux and Unix distributions: Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Gentoo, Arch Linux, Void Linux, Alpine Linux, NixOS, Guix and finally FreeBSD (Unix).

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