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Software

Software: LibreNMS, Pidgin, Wireshark and More

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Software
  • Featured Network Monitoring Tool for Linux

    LibreNMS is an open source, powerful and feature-rich auto-discovering PHP based network monitoring system which uses the SNMP protocol. It supports a broad range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and many more.

  • Get started with Pidgin: An open source replacement for Skype

    Technology is at an interesting crossroads, where Linux rules the server landscape but Microsoft rules the enterprise desktop. Office 365, Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, OneDrive, Outlook... the list goes on of Microsoft software and services that dominate the enterprise workspace.

    What if you could replace that proprietary software with free and open source applications and make them work with an Office 365 backend you have no choice but to use? Buckle up, because that is exactly what we are going to do with Pidgin, an open source replacement for Skype.

  • Wireshark, World’s Most Popular Network Protocol Analyzer, Gets Major Release

    Wireshark, world’s most popular open-source network protocol analyzer, has been updated to a new stable series, versioned 2.6, a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, as well as support for new protocols.

    A lot of user interface improvements have been made since Wireshark 2.5, and Wireshark 2.6 appears to be the last release that will support the legacy GTK+ graphical user interface, as the development team announced it wouldn't be supported in the next major series, Wireshark 3.0.

    New features in Wireshark 2.6 include support for HTTP Request sequences, support for MaxMind DB files, Microsoft Network Monitor capture file support, as well as LoRaTap capture interface support. The IP map feature was removed, as well as support for the GeoIP and GeoLite Legacy databases.

  • A look at terminal emulators, part 2

    A comparison of the feature sets for a handful of terminal emulators was the subject of a recent article; here I follow that up by examining the performance of those terminals. This might seem like a lesser concern, but as it turns out, terminals exhibit surprisingly high latency for such fundamental programs. I also examine what is traditionally considered "speed" (but is really scroll bandwidth) and memory usage, with the understanding that the impact of memory use is less than it was when I looked at this a decade ago (in French).

  • Counting beans—and more—with Beancount

    It is normally the grumpy editor's job to look at accounting software; he does so with an eye toward getting the business off of the proprietary QuickBooks application and moving to something free. It may be that Beancount deserves a look of that nature before too long but, in the meantime, a slightly less grumpy editor has been messing with this text-based accounting tool for a variety of much smaller projects. It is an interesting system, with a lot of capabilities, but its reliance on hand-rolling for various pieces may scare some folks off.

  • Firefox release speed wins

    Sylvestre wrote about how we were able to ship new releases for Nightly, Beta, Release and ESR versions of Firefox for Desktop and Android in less than a day in response to the pwn2own contest.

    People commented on how much faster the Beta and Release releases were compared to the ESR release, so I wanted to dive into the releases on the different branches to understand if this really was the case, and if so, why?

    [..]

    We can see that Firefox 59 and 60.0b4 were significantly faster to run than ESR 52 was! What's behind this speedup?

  • LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 Is Ready To Roll For Advancing The Open-Source Office

    LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 was tagged overnight as the first development release towards this next updated open-source office suite release succeeding the big LibreOffice 6.0.

    LibreOffice 6.1.0 is set to be released by the middle of August and for that to happen the alpha release has now been hit followed by the beta release this time next month, and the release candidates to come through the month of July. The feature freeze and branching occurs at next month's beta stage while the hard code freeze is expected for the middle of July.

Applications: KStars, Kurly, Pamac, QEMU

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Software
  • KStars 2.9.5 is out!

    Autofocus module users would be happy to learn that the HFR value is now responsive to changing seeing conditions. Previously, the first successful autofocus operation would set the HFR Threshold value of which subsequent measurements are compared against during the in-sequence-focusing step.

  • Kurly – An Alternative to Most Widely Used Curl Program

    Kurly is a free open source, simple but effective, cross-platform alternative to the popular curl command-line tool. It is written in Go programming language and works in the same way as curl but only aims to offer common usage options and procedures, with emphasis on the HTTP(S) operations.

    In this tutorial we will learn how to install and use kurly program – an alternative to most widely used curl command in Linux.

  • Pamac – Easily Install and Manage Software on Arch Linux

    Arch Linux is one of the most popular Linux distribution available despite its apparent technicality. Its default package manager pacman is powerful but as time always tells, it is a lot easier to get certain things done using a mouse because GUI apps barely require any typing nor do they require you to remember any commands; and this is where Pamac comes in.

    Pamac is a Gtk3 frontend for libalpm and it is the GUI tool that Arch Linux users turn to the most when they aren’t in the mood to manage their software packages via the terminal; and who can blame them? It was specifically created to be used with Pacman.

  • QEMU 2.12 Released With RISC-V, Spectre/Meltdown & Intel vGPU Action

    QEMU 2.12 is now officially available as the latest stable feature update to this important component to the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

Software: Liberation of Code, GNU Parallel, Devhelp

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Software
  • When should you open source your software?

    It’s 20 years this this since the term ‘Open Source’ was coined. In that time the movement for free and open software has gone from a niche to a common method of distribution and a normal way of operating for businesses.

    Major technology shifts are now driven by open source technologies: Big Data (Hadoop, Spark), AI (TensorFlow, Caffe), and Containers (Docker, Kubernetes) are all open projects. Massive companies including Google, Facebook, and even Lyft regularly release Open Source tools for the world to use. Microsoft – whose former CEO once described Linux as a cancer – now embraces the concept.

  • GNU Parallel 20180422 ('Tiangong-1') released

    Quote of the month:

    Today I discovered GNU Parallel, and I don’t know what to do with all this spare time.
    --Ryan Booker

  • Devhelp news

    For more context, I started to contribute to Devhelp in 2015 to fix some annoying bugs (it’s an application that I use almost every day). Then I got hooked, I contributed more, became a co-maintainer last year, etc. Devhelp is a nice little project, I would like it to be better known and used more outside of GNOME development, for example for the Linux kernel now that they have a good API documentation infrastructure (it’s just a matter of generating *.devhelp2 index files alongside the HTML pages).

Why Everyone should know vim

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Software
HowTos

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless.

I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me.

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Best Linux apps of 2018

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Software

While everyone knows that most Linux distributions (distros) are free to download, not everybody is aware that you also have access to thousands of cost-free applications through your operating system’s package manager.

Many of the more user-friendly distros will come with a selection of software preinstalled to help you get started, but there are many more apps out in the wild, under continuous development.

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Riot: A Distributed Way of Having IRC and VOIP Client and Home Server

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Software

Riot is a free and open source decentralized instant messaging application that can be considered an alternative to Slack. Take a look at features of Riot, installation procedure and usage.
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A look at KompoZer Web-editor in GNU/Linux

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Software

Some people code HTML/CSS oldskool in software like Atom, Notepadqq, or even nano/vi, but others enjoy using what’s called a WYSIWYG editor, which stands for What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get.

KompoZer, is a free cross-platform WYSIWYG editor worth looking at despite the fact that it has not been updated for a very long time. Note though that KompoZer lacks support for features like HTML5 or CSS3 that were introduced after the last version of the HTML editor was released.

As is the case with a lot, but not all, of software in GNU/Linux systems that people use, KompoZer is technically multi-platform, but I would say that the GNU/Linux and MacOS user share dominate the Windows one, from my experience.

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Software: Tuptime , dutree, gotop, Nginx

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Software
  • Tuptime - Tool to Display Uptime History of Linux System

    The primary task of the system administrators is monitoring and examine Linux system and how long its been promenade. This article demonstrates use of Tuptime tool that help's System Administrators to analyse how long Linux machine is up and running.

    Tuptime tool counts accidental system restarts and not just only uptime of system. When tuptime is installed on system it registers first boot time after installation. Once the first boot time is registered from there onwards it checks for system tuptime and downtime and represents it in Percentage (%). Tuptime also registers current tuptime of system from last restart. Reports Largest Running system Time, Shortest Running System Time & Average of both.

  • dutree – A CLI Tool to Analyze Disk Usage in Coloured Output

    dutree is a free open-source, fast command-line tool for analyzing disk usage, written in Rust programming language. It is developed from durep (disk usage reporter) and tree (list directory content in tree-like format) command line tools. dutree therefore reports disk usage in a tree-like format.

  • gotop - A Tool to Monitor System Activity in Linux

    Every Linux administrator has it's own preferences on how to monitor processes in terminal. And you probably know about tools like top and htop. These are tools for process monitoring in terminal without any visualization. And you probably know about gtop and vtop which are also process monitoring terminal tools, but with visualization. In this article, we are going to install and use another terminal based graphical activity monitor called gotop. Unlike the two mentioned above, gotop is written in Go.

  • Nginx 1.14 Web Server Released

    Nginx 1.14.0 is now available as the latest open-source stable release of this popular web server alternative to Apache.

  • Cooking With Linux (without a net): A CMS Smorgasbord

    Today, I'm going to install four popular content management systems. These will be Drupal, Joomla, Wordpress, and Backdrop. If you're trying to decide on what your next CMS platform should be, this would be a great time to tune in. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face. Join me today, at 12 noon, Easter Time. Be part of the conversation.

Software: Google Search Navigator, Mixxx and More

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Software
  • Google Search Navigator – Enhance Keyboard Navigation In Google Search

    I am halfway through the “mastering google search” task. Yeah, I can now easily find cat images on Internet without having to search “how to find cat images on Internet” using google. In the pursuit of enhancing my google search skills(!), today I stumbled upon a browser extension named “Google Search Navigator”. It offers some keyboard shortcuts to improve your google search. Google has already provided an experimental Keyboard shortcuts for navigating search results. Unfortunately, It seems like Google has removed this feature as of 2017-07-31. Luckily, a developer has created this extension to enhance keyboard navigation in Google search. This plugin is free and open source. So, you can get the code freely on GitHub link provided at the end of this guide.

    In this guide, we will see how to use “Google Search Navigator” extension to improve your google search experience via some Keyboard shortcuts.

  • Free DJ Software Mixxx 2.1 Released With New And Improved Skins, Overhauled Effects System, More

    Mixxx, the free and open source DJ software, has seen a new release today. Version 2.1 was in development for more than two years, and it brings new and improved controller mapings, updated Deere and LateNight skins, overhauled effects system, and much more.

  • Using mtqq to create a notification network: mosquitto, mqttwarn, hare, and hared

    As you read this post, keep in mind that my particular use case of notification on ssh login is not for everyone. It may not appeal to you. In fact, you might find this to be an absolutely ridiculous thing to do. I respect that. I suggest that somewhere within your network there is at least one type of error condition, one urgent situation, one thing that you would like pushed to your cellphone / pager / etc. It might be a failed HDD for example.

  • Specification and Verification of Software with CafeOBJ – Part 1 – Introducing CafeOBJ

    Software bugs are everywhere – the feared Blue Screen of Death, the mobile phone rebooting at the most inconvenient moment, games crashing. Most of these bugs are not serious problems, but there are other cases that are far more serious:

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April

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Red Hat
Software

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

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