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Software

Moreutils – A Collection Of More Useful Unix Utilities

Filed under
GNU
Software
HowTos

We all know about GNU core utilities that comes pre-installed with all Unix-like operating systems. These are the basic file, shell and text manipulation utilities of the GNU operating system. The GNU core utilities contains the commands, such as cat, ls, rm, mkdir, rmdir, touch, tail, wc and many more, for performing the day-to-day operations. Among these utilities, there are also some other useful collection of Unix utilities which are not included by default in the Unix-like operating systems. Meet moreutilis, a growing collection of more useful Unix utilities. The moreutils can be installed on GNU/Linux, and various Unix flavours such as FreeBSD, openBSD and Mac OS.

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Proprietary Opera Has a New Release, Goes Public

Filed under
Software
Web
  • Opera 55 Web Browser Debuts with Easier Installation of Chrome Extensions, More

    Opera Software has promoted this week the Opera 55 Chromium-based web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including Windows, Mac, and Linux.

    Opera 55 is now the most stable version of the Chromium-based and cross-platform web browser, a release that adds yet another layer of improvements and new features, starting with the installation of Google Chrome extensions from the Chrome Web Store, which is now a lot easier thanks to a new "Install Extension' button that'll be displayed on top of the page when visiting the extensions web store.

  • Opera 55 offers better control of web pages and more accessible bookmarks

    It has been a big summer for us at Opera, and today we are excited to unveil Opera 55.

    The new stable build of our browser includes a smarter layout for the settings page, an expanded security badge and page information pop-up for better page control, easier Chrome Web Store extension installation and more accessible bookmarks.

    Our busy and exciting summer continued on July 27 when we became a listed company on the Nasdaq market and enjoyed a successful initial public offering. This was a major milestone for our company, and one we could not have accomplished without the support and trust from you, our users! A week later, Opera launched as a snap in the Snap Store for Linux systems.

Qt5 Screenshot Tool FlameShot 0.6.0 Adds Pin And Text Tools, More

Filed under
KDE
Software

Flameshot, a Qt 5 screenshot tool, has been updated with new features, like new pin and text tools, a new side panel, and other important improvements.

Flameshot is a tool for taking screenshots which includes features like annotations (you can draw lines, arrows, blur or highlight text, etc. on the screenshot), upload screenshot to Imgur, and more. It comes with a GUI but it can also be controlled from the command line, and it supports X11 while also having experimental Wayland support for Gnome and Plasma.

The biggest change in Flameshot 0.6.0 is for me the merge of its 3 menu entries into a single entry. Previously, Flameshot installed 3 menu entries, for taking a screenshot, launch the application in tray mode, or open its settings, which was confusing.

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Also: Dropbear SSH a lightweight alternative to OpenSSH

8 Feature Rich Image Viewers for Linux

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Software

Is your default image viewer not giving you the image viewing experience you desire? Do you feel frustrated that it lacks other essential editing capabilities that you think are crucial for a more immersive viewing and editing experience?

In this tutorial, we’ll look some nice alternative image viewer to the default one on Linux and see how to install its packages on Ubuntu, Centos and Arch Linux.

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Also: GIMP 2.10.6 Released with Vertical Text, New Filters and Improvements

Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak

Filed under
Red Hat
Software
  • Release 1.0.0

    Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This
    new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first
    introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version,
    and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible.

    The following release notes describe the major changes since
    0.10.0. For a complete overview of Flatpak, please see
    docs.flatpak.org.

  • Linux Application Sandboxing And Distribution Framework Flatpak Reaches Version 1.0 Stable

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has reached version 1.0 stable. Compared to the previous stable series (0.10.x), the new version should have faster installation and updates, it allows marking applications as end-of-life, and it asks the user to confirm app permissions at install time, among other improvements.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment, package management, and application virtualization for Linux. Applications built with Flatpak can run on almost any Linux distribution. Flatpak applications run in a sandbox environment in which the applications are isolated from the rest of the system, and require permission from the user to access the user's files or access hardware devices.

  • Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Hits 1.0 Milestone After Three Years in Development

    The Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, formerly XDG-App, used for building and distributing conternized apps on Linux desktops, has hit today the 1.0 milestone.

    After being in development for more than three years, the widely-used Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has finally reached the 1.0 version, which means that it's mature enough to be deployed and used in production environments for distributing and running Linux apps.

    "Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version, and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible," said developer Alexander Larsson.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Released For Delivering The Best Linux App Sandboxing

15 GNU/Linux Popular Apps in AppImage

Filed under
Software

Here's popular applications on GNU/Linux available in AppImage format in August 2018. They are LibreOffice, Krita, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Synfig Studio, Inkscape, GIMP, VLC, Emacs, and some more. I list here either they are official (built by original project) or unofficial (built by individual contributor). If you see the name probono below, he is Simon Peter, the founding father of AppImage technology. You can run these AppImages on your GNU/Linux distros (or even test them on LiveCD session). Finally, by publishing this, I hope all the original developers insterested to provide AppImage versions officially. Enjoy!

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Software: GIMP, Password Safe, and Podcasts

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Software
  • GIMP 2.10.6 Introduces Vertical Text, New Filters, and GIMP Extension Public Repo

    A brand-new point release for popular photo editing software GIMP has been released today, bringing GIMP to version 2.10.6 – this update doesn’t bring a whole load of significant features, but there are some great improvements and new functionalities.

    For starters, GIMP 2.10.6 finally introduces support for vertical text (top to bottom), which has been a highly requested feature particularly for East-Asian writing systems. Thus, users can now set text in mixed orientation (as is typical in East-Asian vertical writing) or upright orientation (more common for Western vertical writing), with right-to-left, as well as left-to-right columns.

  • Password Safe is a KeePass-Compatible Password Manager for Linux

    Password Safe is an open-source KeePass-compatible password manager for Linux, designed specifically for use on the GNOME desktop.

  • Linux users finally get a decent podcasts app called, well, ‘Podcasts’

    Podcasts are a hugely popular form of “infotainment” these days, with almost any and every niche you can think of catered for with a show or a segment. If you’re not enjoying the wealth of podcasts out there, you’re really missing out. Podcasts provide you with the experience of a radio show, covering a wide range of topics ranging from gospel to science fiction to music and every thing in between. There are so many ways to enjoy your podcst. On mobile, popular apps such as PocketCast offer users a one-stop-shop for all the podcasts you can listen to. Many music streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify offer dedicated sections on Podcasts.

Software: Castero, Skrooge, gtk-vnc

Filed under
Software
  • castero – command-line podcast player

    I’ve been tinkering with a few modern podcast players in the past few months. CPod, Vocal and Winds all use modern web technologies; in the case of CPod and Winds a combination of JavaScript weaved with the Electron framework. It’s only fair to take a different tack. castero differs fundamentally — it’s a command line podcast client. It’s designed to be easy to use and targeted at users who want lightweight command line applications instead of bloated GUI-based alternatives.

    castero lets you add podcasts via RSS feeds, and handles a large number of feeds. It’s released under an open source license.

    The software is written in the Python programming language.

  • Skrooge 2.15.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.15.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • gtk-vnc 0.9.0 release

    I’m pleased to announce a new release of GTK-VNC, version 0.9.0. This is a cleanup/modernization release. Note that the next release (1.0.0) will drop support for GTK-2

Wine 3.14 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.14 is now available.

  • Wine 3.14 Adds DXTn Texture Decompression, Other Improvements

    Due to the summer holidays it's been four weeks since Wine 3.13 but it has now been succeeded by Wine 3.14 as the newest feature release.

    Wine 3.14 adds support for DXTn texture decompression, deferral support for MSI install actions, Japanese keyboard support within DirectInput, improvements to the standard task dialog, more Shell32 icons, and a total of 36 bug fixes. Those bug fixes range from Adobe CS4 issues to problems with Wargaming, Chromium, Guild Wars, Civilization V, Chaos League, and other software.

  • Grab a glass as Wine 3.14 is out today with DXTn texture decompression support and plenty of fixes

    The latest and greatest in fine Wine [Official Site] is out today with Wine 3.14 filled with features and the usual bug fixes including support for DXTn texture decompression

Software: Selenium, Password Managers, MAAS

Filed under
Software
  • Testing web applications with Selenium

    Whenever one is engaged in large-scale changes to a software project, it is nice to have some assurance that regressions are not being introduced in the process. Test suites can be helpful in that regard. But while the testing of low-level components can be relatively straightforward, testing at the user-interface level can be harder. Web applications, which must also interact with web browsers, can be especially challenging in this regard. While working on just this sort of project, your editor finally got around to looking at Selenium WebDriver as a potential source of help for the testing problem.

    The overall goal of the Selenium project is automating the task of dealing with web browsers (from the user side). The WebDriver component, in particular, provides an API allowing a program to control a browser and observe how the browser reacts. There are many potential applications for this kind of functionality; it could be used to automate any of a number of tiresome, web-oriented tasks that resist the use of simpler tools, for example. But perhaps the most obvious use case is regression-testing of web applications.

    The Selenium code is distributed under version 2.0 of the Apache license; it is available on GitHub. The WebDriver component offers API bindings for a number of languages, including Java, JavaScript, C#, Perl, PHP, Python (2 and 3), and Ruby. Your editor, naturally, was interested in the Python bindings. Fedora 28 packages the relatively old 3.7.0 release from December 2017, which is discouraging, but the current 3.14.0 release can be had from PyPI. One must also obtain a "driver" for one or more specific browsers; your editor has been using geckodriver to test with Firefox.

  • Best Free Linux Password Managers

    A password manager is a utility which helps users store and retrieve passwords and other data. Most password managers use a local database to hold the encrypted password data.

    In modern society, people face a bamboozling amount of information to retain. Most people read a considerable amount of information online on a regular basis. Whether you conduct business online, read for your job, or just read for pleasure, the internet is a vast source of information. Retaining that information on a long-term basis can be difficult. However, some nuggets of information need to be recalled quickly. Passwords are one such example.

    As a computer user, you’ll no doubt have numerous passwords to remember. Sites have arbitrary rules for various services. For example, a site may insist on a minimum number of characters, capital letters, numerals, and special characters which make choosing the same password for each site to be impossible. More importantly, there are good security reasons not to duplicate passwords. Password reuse and simple, easy-to-guess passwords are difficult issues. If you’re using the same password on more than one site, you risk having several accounts stolen if any one of them is breached.

  • MAAS 2.4.1 released!

    MAAS 2.4.1 has now been released and it is a bug fix release. Please see more details in discourse.maas.io [1].

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