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Software

Software: Audacity, Cryptomator, VLC, Corydalis, RcppEigen, Cockpit, Flowblade

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Software
  • Audacity – An Ideal App for Multi-Track Recording & Editing

    Great history is always made whenever the greats rub minds together. In some cases, it is a groundbreaking finding in chemistry or biology. In some others, it is the solution to problems that impeded our technological advancements using computers.

    In this case, it is the release of a free open-source digital audio and recording computer software application for Windows, GNU/Linux, and OS X – Audacity. It was built by Roger Dannenberg and Dominic Mazzoni at Carnie Mellon university, around fall, in the years 1999-2000.

  • Cryptomator - Encrypt your Cloud Data Files on Linux

    Figuring out a good path to security for your cloud data can be quite a challenge. Normally, the cloud is a very safe place for data, despite Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) from those who might want to access their data everywhere anytime. But the security is a very problem so we need to use some tools or methods in other to prevent the risks. This is why you can use some tools like cryptomator to encrypt your data files.

  • VLC 3.0 Should Be Out By The End Of The Week

    The long sought after VLC 3.0 multimedia player release will be here anytime now.

    VLC 3.0.0 was already tagged in Git and the final preparations are underway in putting out this major update to the open-source, cross-platform media player.

    The VLC project expects to officially announce v3.0 by the end of the week, but considering how long this release cycle has been drawn out, it wouldn't surprise me if it becomes a few extra days.

  • Releasing Corydalis

    So, without further ado, … wait, I already said everything! Corydalis v0.2.0 (a rather arbitrarily chosen version number) is up on GitHub.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.4.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.4.0 of RcppEigen hit CRAN earlier today, and just went to Debian as well. It brings Eigen 3.3.4 to R.

  • Cockpit 161

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 161.

  • Screencasts on Linux, part 2

    Well, no more, it seems. I seem to have missed a beautiful, functional, easy to use, and relatively fast one, called Flowblade.

    I had never heard of it, and I haven’t seen it mentioned on any of the sites I looked for video editing software reviews on. I only ran into it while browsing the available Flatpaks on Flathub. However, it has been in development for a couple of years, and it’s development seems active, though a bit dependent on a single coder.

    Having said that, I tip my hat to that single coder, who goes by the name of jliljebl, because this software is A-MA-ZING!

11 Excellent Free Scorewriters – Compose, arrange, print, and publish music

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Software

A scorewriter (often known as notation software or music notation processor) is software used with a computer for creating, editing and printing sheet music.

For a musician to be able to read, understand, and play music, a composition needs to be in written form. A system of notation is essential for musicians to be able to play music as intended by the composer.

In the field of music composition, Sibelius and Finale are held in high esteem. These scorewriters are widely used by composers, songwriters, and arrangers for creating sheet music, including the score for an ensemble and parts for individual musicians. Unfortunately, both Sibelius and Finale are proprietary software. They are very expensive applications; the cheapest perpetual license for Sibelius sets you back a princely £500. And neither application is available for Linux.

Fortunately, there is a wide range of open source scorewriters which are supported in Linux. This article recommends cost-effective alternatives to Sibelius and Finale. The software featured here is released under freely distributable licenses, all are available to download at no charge, and generate music scores which are engraved with traditional layout rules.

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3 command-line tools for feigning productivity

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Software

If you ever spent time growing up watching spy thrillers, action flicks, or crime movies, you developed a clear picture in your mind of what a hacker's computer screen looked like. Rows upon rows of rapidly moving code, streams of grouped hexadecimal numbers flying past like raining code in The Matrix.

Perhaps there's a world map with flashing points of light and a few rapidly updating charts thrown in there for good measure. And probably a 3D rotating geometric shape, because why not? If possible, this is all shown on a ridiculous number of monitors in an ergonomically uncomfortable configuration. I think Swordfish sported seven.

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New Linux User? Try These 8 Great Essential Linux Apps

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GNU
Linux
Software

When you are new to Linux, even if you are not new to computers in general, one of the problems you will face is which apps to use. With millions of Linux apps, the choice is certainly not easy. Below you will find eight (out of millions) essential Linux apps to get you settled in quickly.

Most of these apps are not exclusive to Linux. If you have used Windows/Mac before, chances are you are familiar with some of them. Depending on what your needs and interests are, you might not need all these apps, but in my opinion, most or all of the apps on this list are useful for newbies who are just starting out on Linux.

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Also: Missing Microsoft Office? Try SoftMaker Office 2018 for Linux

Software: Papyrus, Gnocchi, MenuLibre

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Software
  • Papyrus – A Different Note Manager with Better Security

    Papyrus is an open-source and multi-platform base note manager with a primary focus on social features and privacy. It is developed by Aseman, the same company behind Cutegram, an excellent alternative to Telegram’s desktop client for Linux.

    It prides itself on being smart, easy, secure, modern, and different; with a User Interface that is user-friendly and will be intuitive enough for anybody to install the app and get on with creating, syncing, and sharing notes.

  • Gnocchi 4.2 release

    The time of the release arrived. A little more than three months have passed since the latest minor version, 4.1, has been released. There are tons of improvement and a few nice significant features in this release!

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Released

    With improved support for Budgie, KDE, and MATE desktop environments, MenuLibre 2.1.5 continues to provide one of the best menu editing experiences for the Linux desktop.

  • MenuLibre 2.1.5 Menu Editor Adds Budgie & KDE Plasma Support

    MenuLibre is the menu editor program supporting FreeDesktop.org's Desktop Entry Specification and supports most desktop environments out there for customizations of their menus.

    Today's MenuLibre 2.1.5 release notably adds support for menu editing on the Budgie and KDE Plasma desktop environments. This adds to MenuLibre officially supporting GNOME, LXDE, LXQt, Pantheon, Unity, and Xfce.

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Software and Games: XenServer Clone, Rancher, GRV, Flatpak, Steam and Godot

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Software
Gaming
  • New Open Source Project Takes Aim at XenServer

    An initial Kickstarter campaign to raise $7,500 to begin development of a XenServer clone has already pulled in over $32,000.

  • Rancher – A Complete Container Management Platform For Production Environment

    Docker is a cutting-edge software used for containerization, that is used in most of IT companies to reduce infrastructure cost.

    By default docker comes without any GUI, which is easy for Linux administrator to manage it and it’s very difficult for developers to manage. When it’s come to production then it’s very difficult for Linux admin too. So, what would be the best solution to manage the docker without any trouble.

  • GRV - A Tool to View Git Repo from Linux Terminal

    GRV is an opensource tool to display git repository on Linux terminal. This tool provides screens to view refs, branches and diffs in separate tabs. The behaviour and style can be customized through configuration. A query language can be used to filter refs and commits. In this article, I will show GRV features and installation steps on Ubuntu 16.04.

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  • Flatpak, Steam Cloud, and XDG Base Directories

    If you’ve installed Steam on Linux through Flathub, chances are that Steam Auto-Cloud — Steam’s free game progress synchronization service — won’t work for many of your games that are built with the markets most popular game engines. I have dug into why it isn’t working, and discuss two possible solutions to fix the problem.

    Disclaimer: The Steam for Flatpak package on Flathub is a third-party community effort and isn’t endorsed nor supported by Valve Corporation.

    I’ll need to establish quite a bit of context regarding where games and applications store their configuration files and user data, and how they decide on where to store it. If you’re already familiar with the XDG Base Directory specification, you can glance at the tables and skip straight to the third section.

  • Open-source game dev tool Godot Engine adds VR support

Software: stress-ng, RVowpalWabbit, Biogenesis

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Software
  • stress-ng V0.09.15

    It has been a while since my last post about stress-ng so I thought it would be useful to provide an update on the changes since V0.08.09.

    I have been focusing on making stress-ng more portable so it can build with various versions of clang and gcc as well as run against a wide range of kernels. The portability shims and config detection added to stress-ng allow it to build and run on a wide range of Linux systems, as well as GNU/HURD, Minix, Debian kFreeBSD, various BSD systems, OpenIndiana and OS X.

  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.12

    And yet another boring little RVowpalWabbit package update, now to version 0.0.12, and still in response to the CRAN request of not writing files where we should not (as caught by new tests added by Kurt). I had misinterpreted one flag and actually instructed to examples and tests to write model files back to the installed directory. Oops. Now fixed. I also added a reusable script for such tests in the repo for everybody's perusal (but it will require Linux and bindfs).

  • Evolving Your Own Life: Introducing Biogenesis

    The top of the window gives you the current statistics, including the time, the number of organisms, how many are dead, and the oxygen and carbon dioxide levels. It also provides a bar with the relative proportions of the genes.

    Below this pane is a list of some remarkable organisms within your world. These are organisms that have had the most children, the most victims or those that are the most infected. This way, you can focus on organisms that are good at the traits you're interested in.

    On the right-hand side of the window is a display of the world history to date. The top portion displays the history of the population, and the bottom portion displays the history of the atmosphere. As your world continues evolving, click the update button to get the latest statistics.

    This software package could be a great teaching tool for learning about genetics, the environment and how the two interact. If you find a particularly interesting organism, be sure to share it with the community at the project website. It might be worth a look there for starting organisms too, allowing you to jump-start your explorations.

Wine 3.1 Released

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.1 is now available.

  • Wine 3.1 Released As The First Step Towards Wine 4.0

    With two weeks having passed since the big Wine 3.0 release, the Wine crew is back to their bi-weekly development releases.

    Wine 3.1 is the first bi-weekly development snapshot towards what will eventually become the Wine 4.0 stable release by this time next year, given the project's shift to an annual release cadence.

    Wine 3.1 adds Kerberos authentication support, window class redirections for Common Controls 6, support for X11 ARGB visuals, a DOSBox requirement for running DOS executables, and a total of 29 known bug fixes. The bug fixes range from fixing Qt5 applications to Grand Theft Auto V issues to Doom 4 / DOOM 2016 problems and other Windows-on-Linux gaming issues.

Software and Games: Laptop Mode Tools, Sylpheed, Telegram, Plasma Mobile and More

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Software
Gaming
  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.72

    I'm pleased to announce the 1.72 release of Laptop Mode Tools. Major changes include the port of the GUI configuration utility to Python 3 and PyQt5.

  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.72 Ported To Python 3 & PyQt5

    For those making use of laptop-mode-tools as one of several Linux power saving tools with this one designed to improve Linux laptop battery life, version 1.72 is now available after more than one year of development.

  • Sylpheed 3.7.0

    Sylpheed is a simple, lightweight but featureful, and easy-to-use e-mail client distributed under the GNU GPL (the library part is GNU LGPL). You can freely use, modify and redistribute it under the license. Sylpheed provides intuitive user-interface. Sylpheed is also designed for keyboard-oriented operation, so Sylpheed can be widely used from beginners to power users.

  • Cooler Unofficial Telegram Apps are on the Way

    Telegram is a cross-platform messaging service analogous to WhatsApp, but with a much broader set of features. You can have public channels and groups, for instance, and run bots.

    Telegram has official apps for pretty much every major operating system out there, including Android, iOS, macOS, Windows and Linux.

  • Write-up for SoK Project – OpenQA Plasma Mobile

    KDE Goal: Usability and Productivity proposed by Nate Graham, is one of the three goals selected by KDE. This goal will focus on polishing our basic software so everyone will be delighted to use it. One of important aspect of Usability and Productivity is focus on quality assurance.

    In this Season of KDE (SoK) 2018, I am working on “OpenQA Plasma Mobile” project. This project indirectly helps to achieve the goal of Usability and Productivity as it would work to get the higher quality version of the mobile by creating integration testing for it. It would make it easier to test the common operations of the mobile.

  • Powerless is quite possibly one of the worst FPS games I've ever played

    Thanks to Steam's new curator system, we get sent keys to various games where developers want us to review it. I took a look at Powerless [Steam] and I was not impressed.

    Sometimes we get sent really interesting games I've never heard about through our Steam Curator, like HYPERNOVA: Escape from Hadea. Then there's times like this, where I'm quite literally telling you not to buy a game—which is incredibly rare for me to do so.

  • XCOM 2 for Linux has been updated, also there's a new XCOM 2 Collection

    A little late, but better late than never. Feral Interactive have pushed out an updated build of XCOM 2 [Steam] for Linux. There's also now the XCOM 2 Collection you can buy.

  • Single-player first-person dungeon crawler 'Delver' has released, the SteamOS icon has also returned

    Delver [Steam, Official Site] is a positively rated single-player first-person dungeon crawler, which has just today left Early Access. It has also seen the return of the SteamOS icon for it.

Software: Curl, AtCore, PiCluster, Prometheus, Vivaldi

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Software
  • Reducing 2038-problems in curl

    libcurl is very portable and is built and used on virtually all current widely used operating systems that run on 32bit or larger architectures (and on a fair amount of not so widely used ones as well).

    This offers some challenges. Keeping the code stellar and working on as many platforms as possible at the same time is hard work.

  • AtCore 1.0.0 Release.

    Today I would like to announce the release of AtCore 1.0.0. This is the first stable release for AtCore. Since its the first release and we have not written a “real” client for it yet we include our test GUI. If you own a 3D Printer you are encouraged to try AtCore for at least one print job.

  • PiCluster 2.3 is out!

    PiCluster aims to provide an easy-to-use solution to manage your Docker containers. A lot of work has gone into development over the past several months and  I am pleased to announce PiCluster 2.3! Let’s take a look at what is new in this release.

  • Changes in Prometheus 2.0

    2017 was a big year for the Prometheus project, as it published its 2.0 release in November. The new release ships numerous bug fixes, new features and, notably, a new storage engine that brings major performance improvements. This comes at the cost of incompatible changes to the storage and configuration-file formats. An overview of Prometheus and its new release was presented to the Kubernetes community in a talk held during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon. This article covers what changed in this new release and what is brewing next in the Prometheus community; it is a companion to this article, which provided a general introduction to monitoring with Prometheus.

  • Vivaldi 1.14 Debuts as World's First Web Browser to Feature Vertical Reader Mode

    Vivaldi Technologies announced today the release and general availability of the Vivaldi 1.14 web browser, which introduces several new features, optimizations, and bug fixes.

    Vivaldi 1.14 not only celebrates the project's third anniversary, but it becomes world's first web browser to introduce a vertical reader mode, which will benefit users of Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Japanese, and Korean languages. They can use the new vertical mode to more comfortably view and read texts in their languages in a distraction-free reader mode.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm

  • Logstash 6.2.0 Release Improves Open Source Data Processing Pipeline
    The "L" in the ELK stack gets updated with new features including advanced security capabilities. Many modern enterprises have adopted the ELK (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana) stack to collect, process, search and visualize data. At the core of the ELK stack is the open-source Logstash project which defines itself as a server-side data processing pipeline - basically it helps to collect logs and then send them to a users' "stash" for searching, which in many cases is Elasticsearch.
  • Alfresco Software acquired by Private Equity Firm
    Enterprise apps company taken private in a deal that won't see a change in corporate direction. Alfresco has been developing its suite of Enterprise Content Management (ECM) and Business Process Management (BPM) technology since the company was founded back in June of 2005. On Feb. 8, Alfresco announced that it was being acquired by private equity firm Thomas H. Lee Partners (THL). Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

Servers and GPUs: Theano, DevOps, Kubernetes, AWS

  • Open Source Blockchain Computer Theano
    TigoCTM CEO Cindy Zimmerman says “we are excited to begin manufacturing our secure, private and open source desktops at our factory in the Panama Pacifico special economic zone. This is the first step towards a full line of secure, blockchain-powered hardware including desktops, servers, laptops, tablets, teller machines, and smartphones.” [...] Every component of each TigoCTM device is exhaustively researched and selected for its security profile based especially on open source hardware, firmware, and software. In addition, devices will run the GuldOS operating system, and open source applications like the Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dash blockchains. This fully auditable stack is ideal for use in enterprise signing environments such as banks and investment funds.
  • Enterprises identify 10 essential tools for DevOps [Ed: "Source code repository" and other old things co-opted to promote the stupid buzzword "devops"]
    Products branded with DevOps are everywhere, and the list of options grows every day, but the best DevOps tools are already well-known among enterprise IT pros.
  • The 4 Major Tenets of Kubernetes Security
    We look at security from the perspective of containers, Kubernetes deployment itself and network security. Such a holistic approach is needed to ensure that containers are deployed securely and that the attack surface is minimized. The best practices that arise from each of the above tenets apply to any Kubernetes deployment, whether you’re self-hosting a cluster or employing a managed service. We should note that there are related security controls outside of Kubernetes, such as the Secure Software Development Life Cycle (S-SDLC) or security monitoring, that can help reduce the likelihood of attacks and increase the defense posture. We strongly urge you to consider security across the entire application lifecycle rather than take a narrow focus on the deployment of containers with Kubernetes. However, for the sake of brevity, in this series, we will only cover security controls within the immediate Kubernetes environment.
  • GPUs on Google’s Kubernetes Engine are now available in open beta
    The Google Kubernetes Engine (previously known as the Google Container Engine and GKE) now allows all developers to attach Nvidia GPUs to their containers. GPUs on GKE (an acronym Google used to be quite fond of, but seems to be deemphasizing now) have been available in closed alpha for more than half a year. Now, however, this service is in beta and open to all developers who want to run machine learning applications or other workloads that could benefit from a GPU. As Google notes, the service offers access to both the Tesla P100 and K80 GPUs that are currently available on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • AWS lets users run SAP apps directly on SUSE Linux
  • SUSE collaborates with Amazon Web Services toaccelerate SAP migrations

Chrome and Firefox

  • The False Teeth of Chrome's Ad Filter.
    Today Google launched a new version of its Chrome browser with what they call an "ad filter"—which means that it sometimes blocks ads but is not an "ad blocker." EFF welcomes the elimination of the worst ad formats. But Google's approach here is a band-aid response to the crisis of trust in advertising that leaves massive user privacy issues unaddressed. Last year, a new industry organization, the Coalition for Better Ads, published user research investigating ad formats responsible for "bad ad experiences." The Coalition examined 55 ad formats, of which 12 were deemed unacceptable. These included various full page takeovers (prestitial, postitial, rollover), autoplay videos with sound, pop-ups of all types, and ad density of more than 35% on mobile. Google is supposed to check sites for the forbidden formats and give offenders 30 days to reform or have all their ads blocked in Chrome. Censured sites can purge the offending ads and request reexamination. [...] Some commentators have interpreted ad blocking as the "biggest boycott in history" against the abusive and intrusive nature of online advertising. Now the Coalition aims to slow the adoption of blockers by enacting minimal reforms. Pagefair, an adtech company that monitors adblocker use, estimates 600 million active users of blockers. Some see no ads at all, but most users of the two largest blockers, AdBlock and Adblock Plus, see ads "whitelisted" under the Acceptable Ads program. These companies leverage their position as gatekeepers to the user's eyeballs, obliging Google to buy back access to the "blocked" part of their user base through payments under Acceptable Ads. This is expensive (a German newspaper claims a figure as high as 25 million euros) and is viewed with disapproval by many advertisers and publishers.
  • Going Home
  • David Humphrey: Edge Cases
  • Experiments in productivity: the shared bug queue
    Over the next six months, Mozilla is planning to switch code review tools from mozreview/splinter to phabricator. Phabricator has more modern built-in tools like Herald that would have made setting up this shared queue a little easier, and that’s why I paused…briefly
  • Improving the web with small, composable tools
    Firefox Screenshots is the first Test Pilot experiment to graduate into Firefox, and it’s been surprisingly successful. You won’t see many people talking about it: it does what you expect, and it doesn’t cover new ground. Mozilla should do more of this.