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Leftovers: Software

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  • Calamares 2.4.2 Universal Linux Installer Supports Disabling of LUKS UI Elements

    The development team behind the Calamares universal installer framework for GNU/Linux distributions announced the second update to the Calamares 2.4 stable series.

    Calamares 2.4.2 is now the latest version of the installer, and, according to release notes, it implements support for disabling LUKS (Linux Unified Key Setup) related UI (User Interface) elements, adds support for Debian-style /etc/default/keyboard configuration as an option, improves the checking of system requirements configuration, and removes the dependency of chfn in the users module.

  • 10 Top Tools for Novelists

    Writing is one of the essential skills in modern society. Being able to communicate effectively is paramount both at work and at home. It makes your thinking visible to others, and is the main way in which work, learning, and intellect is judged by others.

    At first glance, the trusty word processor might seem a good tool for a novelist. After all, in days gone by, budding authors would tap away using a typewritter, and a word processor is the modern day equivalent. Linux has some excellent word processing software such as LibreOffice. However, word processors are actually not the ideal tool for some forms of writing, particularly novel-writing. In fact, it could be said that using a word processor for novel-writing is a recipe for disaster, and actually a retrograde step from a typewritter. Word processors are a general application software that are perfect for constructing business documents, letters, batch mailings using templates, etc. However, many word processors are too obtrusive and distracting for writers. What is needed is software that helps concentrate on the content of the novel, sketch out the chapters and scenes, work out the best structure, import research, add locations, characters and objects, and so on.

  • Lighttpd 1.4.42 Brings New Modules, Rewritten Authentication Framework

    Lighttpd 1.4.42 was released this Sunday morning as the newest version of this open-source, lightweight HTTP web-server.

    Lighttpd 1.4.42 introduces some new modules including mod_deflate, mod_geoip, and mod_uploadprogress. This release also has a rewritten auth framework that affects mod_authn_ldap, mod_authn_gssapi, and mod_authn_mysql.

  • Nautilus 3.22.1 File Manager Improves the Batch Renaming Feature, Adds Fixes

    The popular Nautilus (Files) file manager saw its first point release for the latest 3.22 series, distributed as part of the recently announced GNOME 3.22.1 desktop environment.

    Yes, that's right, we're talking here about Nautilus 3.22.1, the latest, and most advanced, stable version of the file manager used in numerous GNU/Linux distributions, including the very popular Ubuntu, Fedora Workstation, openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed, Solus, and many others.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Atom 1.11

    Atom 1.11 features performance and stability improvements and, in particular, we’re excited that Atom now asks for permission before sending any telemetry data.

  • Is Open Source Design a Thing?

    The prowess and power of Open Source is undeniable. From servers, to the desktop, mobile, to the underpinnings of the so-called “Internet of Things”, Open Source spans sectors and continents, public and private. One profession, however, that has traditionally been dominated by closed, proprietary software solutions – and usually very expensive ones at that! – is the field of design. In this article, we’ll take a look at some free and open source options to pad, if not replace your existing design arsenal. Maybe you’re a designer just starting out and you are understandably on a budget. Maybe you’re more seasoned and simply want to adopt more of an “open” workflow. Read on and let’s see what the free and open source software world has to offer!

  • Audacious 3.8, Terminix 1.3.0, Atom 1.11.1, MATE Dock Applet 0.75 [PPA Updates Part 1]
  • Multiload-ng 1.4.0, GNOME Twitch 0.3.0, Sublime Text 3 Build 3126 [PPA Updates Part 2]
  • tint 0.0.3: Tint Is Not Tufte

    The tint package, whose name stands for Tint Is Not Tufte , on CRAN offers a fresh take on the excellent Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

  • New free software projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Calibre 2.70 Ebook Manager Adds Tool to Download External Resources for Books

    Today, October 14, 2016, Calibre developer Kovid Goyal proudly announced the release and immediate availability of the Calibre 2.70 ebook library management software for all supported platforms.

    Calibre 2.70 comes two weeks after the release of Calibre 2.69, and it promises two new features. First, there is a new tool implemented in the Edit Book component and designed to let users download external resources, such as stylesheets or images, that aren't included in a book.

    The second feature added in the Calibre 2.70 release is support for custom columns in the Manage Categories sub menu of the Alter Tag Browser function. Also new is the implementation of the Various Danish news source, which has been submitted by Allan Simonsen.

  • Vectr’s Roadmap: How Free Cross-Platform Graphics Editor Is Going To Evolve Over The Next Year

    Vectr is a free collaborative vector graphics editor, for both web & desktop. Our mission is to help everyone create vector graphic designs easily and intuitively, using its simple yet powerful web and desktop cross-platform tool. For three years now we’ve been working hard building Vectr from scratch. Last month we launched Vectr 1.0 out of beta and got covered by top media creating lots of positive buzz in design and tech communities. This is however only the beginning of journey for Vectr.

  • Get your Linux on

    One of the top requests from the community after we launched end-to-end encryption was to also provide a Linux client. We’ve just released an experimental version, available from

    Our Linux app has comparable functionality with Wire for Windows and macOS, and calls, video calls, etc. work cross-platform. However, it is an experimental build and we expect to see some issues arise from day-to-day usage. One known shortcoming is that there is no auto-update. We recommend to follow Wire News to find out about updates.

  • Getting started with music production on Linux: Three ways to get set up with pro-audio free software

    There are plenty of reasons to choose Linux over other platforms for audio production: For me, I was willing to learn some new software, and was sick of being burned by vendor lock-in, not even to mention the crazy high cost of DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software. I wanted to have a free software audio set-up that I could "set up and forget", so I could stop wasting time tinkering with different options, and instead jump head-first into producing soundtracks for the video games I'm developing on Linux.

    So, I investigated 3 different routes, and recorded my results here.

    The conclusion? KXStudio is super freaking cool. Seriously: Install once and get a crazy number of instruments and effects, dozens of DAWs and sequencers, on top of a low-latency kernel, all set up and ready to go, all for free. At least in terms of quantity, it's the simplest way to go from 0 to 60 for audio production on any platform. Pro-audio in Linux is totally here.

  • PlayOnLinux second review - The magic man?

    Roughly five years ago, I tested PlayOnLinux. My first reaction was, blimey, was it five years ago? Damn. It feels like only a few months back. Anyhow, this program is a very nice wrapper for WINE, allowing you to install Windows software with more ease and a higher chance of success than just manually. In Linux. Need I say that?

    Back in 2011, PlayOnLinux did an okay job, but as I aptly titled the article, there are no miracles. Some of the stuff simply did not work. Fast forward a lot, WINE seems to have stagnated, at least in my experience. Winetricks looks outdated. Which leaves us with PlayOnLinux, and recently it did an excellent job of getting Sketchup 3D to run on Ubuntu. So, we are giving it a second chance. Five years is a long time in the binary world. Let us see if and how PlayOnLinux has changed. Perhaps there will be a miracle this time. To wit.

Leftovers: Software Development

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  • TFW an obituary you wrote five years ago goes viral

    This is not a new phenomenon. Social media snap-posts have killed off celebrities hundreds of times before their actual deaths (to the point where some have required websites to constantly fact-check their mortality). Facebook is full of years-late "RIP" posts. The Internet may never forget, but the humans who use it have become increasingly absent-minded.

    It wasn't even just my story that went viral—a similar Guardian story also resurfaced, probably because of the same "memories" feature on Facebook or some other social media feature that dredges up old content. Still, there was something personally unsettling about having words I had written in tribute of "dmr"—a man whom I credited personally for making my early exposure to computing and its potential possible—suddenly resurface five years later.

    The first few times I spotted Twitter acting up, I thanked people for resurfacing the story after so much time. But reading the post again—partially to make sure I hadn't somehow written another tribute subconsciously from my perch at my dad's bedside—was affecting in ways I didn't expect. Maybe I got emotional because I was in a hospital room with my father, who was recovering from an other-than-routine knee replacement surgery, and I had spent the day before sitting in a surgical waiting room.

  • Gitano - Approaching Release - Changes

    As mentioned previously I am working toward getting Gitano into Stretch. A colleague and friend of mine (Richard Maw) did a large pile of work on Lace to support what we are calling sub-defines. These let us simplify Gitano's ACL files, particularly for individual projects.

  • anytime 0.0.3: Extension and fixes

    anytime arrived on CRAN with releases 0.0.1 and 0.0.2 about a month ago. anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects.

  • motranslator 2.0

    Yesterday, the motranslator 2.0 has been released. As the version change suggests there are some important changes under the hood.

Wine 1.9.21 Update Improves Adobe Illustrator CS6 and The Longest Journey Demo

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Today, October 14, 2016, the Wine development team announced the release of a new unstable snapshot towards the major Wine 2.0 milestone of the open-source software project that allows you to run Windows apps and games on Linux.

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Also: Wine 1.9.21 Released With HID Minidriver, System Tray Improvements

Chrome 54 for GNU/Linux and Android

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Leftovers: Software

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  • ​IRC 3: The original online chat program gets updated

    Internet Relay Chat (IRC) was born in 1988 to help people message each over over the pre-web internet. While many other programs have become more popular since then, such as Whatsapp, Google Allo, and Slack, IRC lives on primarily in developer communities. Now, IRC developers are updating the venerable protocol to revitalize it for the 21st century.

  • 3 command line conversion tools for Linux

    Recently, a friend innocently asked me how many file formats there are. My semi-serious response was "Think of a soup bowl filled with beach sand."

    OK, there aren't quite that many file formats. That said, you've probably never heard of many of the formats that are commonly-used enough to warrant listing on Wikipedia. Chances are, you'll never see and never use most of them. If, however, you want or need to convert between file formats then there are a quite a few applications for the job.

    Let's take a look at three solid file conversion tools for the Linux command line.

  • axdigi resurrected

    Seems funny to talk about 20 year old code that was a stop-gap measure to provide a bridging function the kernel had not (as yet) got, but here it is, my old bridge code.

    When I first started getting involved in Free Software, I was also involved with hamradio. In 1994 I release my first Free Software, or Open Source program called axdigi. This program allowed you to “digipeat”. This was effectively source route bridging across hamradio packet networks. The code I used for this was originally network sniffer code to debug my PackeTwin kernel driver but got frustrated at there being no digipeating function within Linux, so I wrote axdigi which is about 200 lines.

Leftovers: Software

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  • 9 Best Free FTP Clients for Linux
  • 6 Best Linux Video Editing Software for Free Download

    Technology has been serving humanity with its best. It is a technology that has encouraged us to explore the unexplored and it is technology that gives us confidence. One such technology that has been changing the world is the movie making tools. Now it is a common thing to shoot a movie and edit it. You can do it in your PC. IT is that simple. This has encouraged many of us to explore the world of movie making. And for others just making a surprise birthday video or a wedding anniversary video is unexplainable. These are the videos that are uploaded all over the social media and these are the videos that make people famous at times. But who does the trick? That is when we need to mention the amazing movie editing tools that you can use online.

  • issue #49: kernel 4.8, IP Spoofing, RethinkDB, ProxySQL, Postgres, Elasticsearch & more!
  • issue #48: PostgreSQL 9.6, Security, Otto, armor, Config Mgmt Camp & more!
  • PacketFence v6.3 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PacketFence v6.3.0. This is a major release with new features, enhancements and important bug fixes. This release is considered ready for production use and upgrading from previous versions is strongly advised.

  • Rambox - an alternative Messaging and Email app for Ubuntu

    Gone were the days when the Internet was only used by corporates and tech enthusiasts. With government departments and services going online and even schools recommending online learning systems, the Internet is fast becoming a common household technology.

    As more and more people are learning to use the Internet, the number of those using emailing and messaging services is also going up. Consequently, the competition in the email and online messaging market is intensifying - just to give you an idea, a single company like Google is offering three services (Hangouts, Messenger, and now Allo) just for messaging purpose.

    This, in turn, has resulted in people using multiple services in order to get the best of all worlds. While there's no harm in using several services, you'd likely agree that after a point it becomes really difficult to manage and keep up with all of them. It's then when you start searching for a way that can make life easier for you.

    You'll be glad to know that there exists an application, dubbed Rambox, that's built specifically for this purpose - it lets you access all your commonly used web services from within a single window. In this article, we will discuss the basics of this application as well as the features it provides.

  • Freecell Solver 4.4.0 was Released
  • PVS-Studio is now friends with Linux

    PVS-Studio is a tool for bug detection in C, C++, and C# projects. It is intended for use in finding and fixing security and quality issues in code, before they turn into vulnerabilities, crashes, or painful debugging. Until now it was working for the developers who use the Visual Studio environment.

    The development team of PVS-Studio static code analyser has long and persistently been developing their product for Windows OS, and thus, proved itself as a reliable provider of high quality software.

    Now the team set a bigger goal and started Linux support. In the article devoted to their Linux support the author tells about various tasks that the programmers have set on the stage of the product development.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Xen & KVM Changes Line Up For Linux 4.9
  • Ramme is an Open-Source Instagram App for the Desktop

    Ubuntu Phone has an unofficial Instagram app called Instagraph, but (until now) there was no desktop client available for Ubuntu desktop.

    Although Instagram is (imo) best experienced through its official mobile apps, you can login and browse your feed via the Instagram website.

    But, next time you go to reach for your phone or open a new tab to browse your feed, try Ramme instead.

  • WhatsApp Version Free Download and Install Available for Ubuntu / Linux

    WhatsApp, the widely used free messaging system is now available on many platforms and operating systems. Previously, it was only available for the major platforms such as Android and iOS, but it has recently become available for ChromeOS – based devices like the Chromebooks and it seems to continue this trend of availability on as many platforms as possible.

  • Release 1.9.20

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.20 is now available.

  • Wine Staging 1.9.20 Comes Hot on the Heels of Wine 1.9.20 with More Improvements

    The Wine Staging development team announced recently the release and immediate availability of the Wine Staging 1.9.20 maintenance update for GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Coming hot on the heels of the Wine 1.9.20 development release, which brought reimplementation of the clipboard API (Application Programming Interface), message handling in WebServices component, multiple new API Set libraries, as well as a bunch of bug fixes, Wine Staging 1.9.20 adds some improvements on its own end.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Docker 1.12.2 App Container Engine Is Almost Here, Second RC Brings More Fixes

    The development cycle of the Docker 1.12.2 maintenance update to the widely-used open-source and cross-platform application container engine continues with a second Released Candidate, as announced on October 3, 2016, by Docker engineer Victor Vieux.

    Docker 1.12.2 Release Candidate 2 (RC2) comes one week after the unveiling of the first RC milestone, mainly to address more of the bugs and annoyance discovered lately or reported by users since the first point release of the major Docker 1.12 release. Again, the entire changelog is attached below if you like to read the technical details.

    As you might know, Docker 1.12 introduced a lot of exciting new features, such as the built-in orchestration and routing mesh, the brand new Swarm Mode, as well as a bunch of networking improvements for better security. And it looks like Docker 1.12.2 will attempt to further improve the Swarm Mode and networking functionalities.

  • Kodi 17 "Krypton" Beta 3 Adds More PVR and Video Playback Improvements, Bugfixes

    The day of October 5, 2016, also brought us a new Beta of the upcoming Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software, the third and most probably the last for this development cycle.

    As we told you in the report about the second Beta of Kodi 17, the final release of the popular media center is launching later this fall with numerous new features and improvements in areas like skinning, video playback, PVR/DVR, live TV, music library, etc. Beta 3 comes three weeks after the release of the second Beta milestone, and it includes a bunch of fixes for various issues reported by users since then.

  • Frogr 1.2 released

    Of course, just a few hours after releasing frogr 1.1, I’ve noticed that there was actually no good reason to depend on gettext 0.19.8 for the purposes of removing the intltool dependency only, since 0.19.7 would be enough.

  • Frogr Flickr Uploader for Linux Is Now Available as a Flatpak

    Like most people living in 2016 I don’t use Flickr. But if I did, I’d probably use Frogr to manage and upload my photos. Frogr is one of a few apps that I’ve written about across all 7+ years I’ve run this site.

  • Libvirt 2.3 Virtualization API Released

    The libvirt Linux virtualization API has been updated to version 2.3 today with some new features and plenty of bug fixes.

  • Harmony Music Player Gets A Gorgeous Dark Mode, Other Improvements

    If you're a fan of the Harmony music player then listen up: there's a new update waiting for you to download.

  • This Extension Adds Dynamic Transparency to GNOME Shell’s Top Bar

    Making the GNOME top panel transparent is something a lot of users like to do — but it can look a little out of place when you maximise a window. Dynamic TopBar is a nifty little extension for the GNOME Shell desktop that “makes the top bar transparent when no window is maximized.”

  • ActivityPub and MediaGoblin at TPAC 2016 (or: ActivityPub needs your review!)

    It seems a recurring meme in MediaGoblin land to say “we’ve been quiet, because we’ve been busy” (or maybe historically on every tech blog ever), but I guess I can’t resist repeating the mantra. It’s true! Though the weight of my focus has been shifted from where I expected it to be. From the last few updates over the last year, you would be right to anticipate that the main thing I would be working on would be merging the federation code Jessica has written and getting 1.0 out the door. That was the plan, and we’re still working towards that, but priorities shifted as we realized the opportunities and time pressures we were under with ActivityPub. After the Social Working Group face to face meeting in June, Jessica and I sat down and talked about what we should do. Jessica had recently started working at Igalia (great people!) and was busy with that and other transitions in her life, so we discussed whether we thought it was most sensible to focus my energy on MediaGoblin or on ActivityPub. It was clear that ActivityPub was shaping into a solid specification, but it was also made clear that the Social Working Group’s charter was running out by the end of 2016. We both think ActivityPub is key to MediaGoblin’s success and didn’t want to see our invested time go to waste, so decided my immediate focus should switch to ActivityPub so it could successfully make it as a standard.

    Which isn’t doom and gloom for MediaGoblin! MediaGoblin development has continued… the community is good enough that people have been able to work while I’ve been busy. I’m happy to say we also appointed longtime contributor Boris Bobrov as co-maintainer to help reduce me being a bottleneck. (Thank you Boris, and congrats!) Other contributors have also stepped up to the plate. I’m especially thankful of Ben Sturmfels for hosting MediaGoblin hackathons and being so responsive to community members. (And of course, there are many others to thank, too!)

    Anyway, I’m not going anywhere, I’ve just been shifting focus to standards work for a bit… but it’s all for the greater good of MediaGoblin. (Well, and the greater federated social web!) Soon, we’ll be putting the work we’re doing on ActivityPub directly into MediaGoblin. When we merge Jessica’s work on federation, we will also retool it so that the first federated release of MediaGoblin will be blazing the trails with ActivityPub.

Wireshark 2.2.1 Network Protocol Analyzer Adds Ascend & K12 Capture File Support

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Today, October 5, 2016, the Wireshark development team announced the release of the first maintenance update for the Wireshark 2.2 series of the world's most popular network protocol analyzer software.

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