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Leftovers: Software

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Leftovers: Software

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  • Git-Series Helps You Track Changes To Patches Over Time

    Kernel developer Josh Triplett has announced the work he's been doing recently on developing git-series, a way to track changes to a patch series over time...

  • remctl 3.12

    This release adds a new, experimental server implementation: remctl-shell. As its name implies, this is designed to be run as a shell of a dedicated user rather than as a server. It does not use the remctl protocol, instead relying on ssh to pass in the command and user information (via special authorized_keys configuration). But it supports the same configuration as the normal remctl server. It can be useful for allowing remctl-style simple RPC in environments that only use ssh public key authentication.

  • RcppGetconf 0.0.1
  • Instagraph — An Unofficial Instagram App for Ubuntu Phone

    An all-new, native Instagram app is coming to Ubuntu Phone. Say hello to Instagraph.

  • Ring – A free, open source and secure alternative to Skype messenger

    In this fast paced modern world, almost all of us are using smartphones and computers to connect with our Family, Friends, and Colleagues from anywhere in the world. All we need is just an Internet enabled device, like a Computer or Smartphone, so that we could easily send text messages, make audio/video calls whenever we want to our beloved ones at any time from anywhere instantly. There are numerous communication applications, both free and paid versions, are available on the market. One of the popular and most widely used application is Skype messenger. Some of you might aware that Microsoft had closely worked with NSA, and helped them to intercept the users Skype video calls. So, Skype lost its integrity, and users started to look for some other alternatives. There are so many alternatives over time. The one we are going to discuss in the tutorial is Ring.

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.3 released with few improvements and bug fixes

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

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Pithos 1.2

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  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released

    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.

  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience

    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client.

    Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.

New Blackmagic and Wine

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Leftovers: Software

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  • The Linux Deepin File Manager Is a Thing of Beauty

    China-based Linux distro Deepin has shown off its all-new desktop file manager. And to say it's pretty is an understatement.

  • GRadio Lets You Find, Listen to Radio Stations from the Ubuntu Desktop

    Love to listen to the radio? My ol’ pal Lolly did. But let’s say you want to listen to the radio on Ubuntu. How do you do it? Well, the Ubuntu Software centre should always be the first dial you try, but you’ll need to sift through a load of static to find a decent app.

  • Reprotest 0.2 released, with virtualization support

    reprotest 0.2 is available in PyPi and should hit Debian soon. I have tested null (no container, build on the host system), schroot, and qemu, but it's likely that chroot, Linux containers (lxc/lxd), and quite possibly ssh are also working. I haven't tested the autopkgtest code on a non-Debian system, but again, it probably works. At this point, reprotest is not quite a replacement for the prebuilder script because I haven't implemented all the variations yet, but it offers better virtualization because it supports qemu, and it can build non-Debian software because it doesn't rely on pbuilder.

  • Calibre 2.63.0 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Unicode 9.0 Support, Bugfixes

    Kovid Goyal has released yet another maintenance update for his popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software, version 2.63.0.

    Calibre 2.63.0 arrives two weeks after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.62.0, which introduced support for the new Kindle Oasis ebook reader from Amazon, as well as reading and writing of EPUB 3 metadata.

    Unfortunately, there aren't many interesting features added in the Calibre 2.63.0 release, except for the implementation of Unicode 9.0 support in the regex engine of the Edit Book feature that lets users edit books that contain characters encoded with the recently released Unicode 9.0 standard.

  • Mozilla Delivers Improved User Experience in Firefox for iOS

    When we rolled out Firefox for iOS late last year, we got a tremendous response and millions of downloads. Lots of Firefox users were ecstatic they could use the browser they love on the iPhone or iPad they had chosen. Today, we’re thrilled to release some big improvements to Firefox for iOS. These improvements will give users more speed, flexibility and choice, three things we care deeply about.

  • LibreOffice 5.2 Is Being Released Next Wednesday

    One week from today will mark the release of LibreOffice 5.2 as the open-source office suite's latest major update.

    LibreOffice 5.2 features a new (optional) single toolbar mode, bookmark improvements. new Calc spreadsheet functions (including forecasting functions), support for signature descriptions, support for OOXML signature import/export, and a wealth of other updates. There are also GTK3 user-interface improvements, OpenGL rendering improvements, multi-threaded 3D rendering, faster rendering, and more.

  • Blackmagic Design Finally Introduces Fusion 8 For Linux
  • Why Microsoft’s revival of Skype for Linux is a big deal [Ed: This article is nonsense right from the headline. Web client is not Linux support. And it's spyware (centralised too).]

Blackmagic on GNU/Linux

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  • Blackmagic Design Announces Fusion 8.2 is now available on Linux free of charge

    Blackmagic Design today announced that Fusion visual effects software is now available on the Linux platform. Linux is extremely popular in the world's leading visual effects production companies and this new Linux release is a major announcement for the visual effects industry.
    This new Linux version of Fusion and Fusion Studio means visual effects artists can select their preferred computing platform, as Fusion is now available on Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux. All project files are common, so customers can work collaboratively, even when different artists are running different platforms on the same job.

  • Blackmagic Puts Fusion 8.2 on Linux, Updates Duplicator

    Blackmagic Design released a pair of announcements, the first revealing that Fusion visual effects software is now available on the Linux platform, and second that it has release version 1.0.2 of Duplicator.

  • Blackmagic Design Announces Blackmagic Duplicator 1.0.2 Update

Leftovers: Software

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  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux

    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release.

    OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.

  • OpenVZ 7.0 released

    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.

  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals

    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.

  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4

    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)

  • RcppArmadillo

    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it.

    For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right.

    Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Leftovers: More Software

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  • PSPP 0.10.2 has been released

    I'm very pleased to announce the release of a new version of GNU PSPP. PSPP is a program for statistical analysis of sampled data. It is a free replacement for the proprietary program SPSS.

  • Skype For Linux Alpha Update Adds ‘Close to Tray’, Call Settings, More
  • Hamster-GTK 0.10.0 Released

    Just a few seconds ago the initial release of Hamster-GTK, version 0.10.0, has been uploaded to the cheese shop. That means that after the rewritten backend codebase hamster-lib has been out in the wild for a few days by now you can now have a first look at a reimplementation of the original hamster 2.0 GUI. It will come as no surprise that this current early version is rather unpolished and leaves a lot to be desired. However, if you are familiar with legacy hamster 2.0 aka hamster-time-tracker you will surely see some major resemblance.

  • Core improvements in digiKam 5.0

    Version 5.0.0 of the digiKam image-management application was released on July 5. In many respects, the road from the 4.x series to the new 5.0 release consisted of patches and rewrites to internal components that users are not likely to notice at first glance. But the effort places digiKam in a better position for future development, and despite the lack of glamorous new features, some of the changes will make users' lives easier as well.

    For context, digiKam 4.0 was released in May of 2014, meaning it has been over two full years since the last major version-number bump. While every free-software project is different, it was a long development cycle for digiKam, which (for example) had released 4.0 just one year after 3.0.

    The big hurdle for the 5.0 development cycle was porting the code to Qt5. While migrating to a new release of a toolkit always poses challenges, the digiKam team decided to take the opportunity to move away from dependencies on KDE libraries. In many cases, that effort meant refactoring the code or changing internal APIs to directly use Qt interfaces rather than their KDE equivalents. But, in a few instances, it meant reimplementing functionality directly in digiKam.

  • MATE Dock Applet 0.73 Released With Redesigned Window List, Drag And Drop Support

    MATE Dock Applet was updated to version 0.73 recently, getting support for rearranging dock icons via drag and drop (only for the GTK3 version), updated window list design and more.

  • Minimalist Web Browser ‘Min’ Sees New Release

    The Min browser project has picked up a new update. Version 1.4 of the open-source, cross-platform web browser adds browser actions and full-text search.

  • Docker adds orchestration and more at DockerCon 2016

    DockerCon 2016, held in Seattle in June, included many new feature and product announcements from Docker Inc. and the Docker project. The main keynote of DockerCon [YouTube] featured Docker Inc. staff announcing and demonstrating the features of Docker 1.12, currently in its release-candidate phase. As with the prior 1.11 release, the new version includes major changes in the Docker architecture and tooling. Among the new features are an integrated orchestration stack, new encryption support, integrated cluster networking, and better Mac support.

    The conference hosted 4000 attendees, including vendors like Microsoft, CoreOS, HashiCorp, and Red Hat, as well as staff from Docker-using companies like Capital One, ADP, and Cisco. While there were many technical and marketing sessions at DockerCon, the main feature announcements were given in the keynotes.

    As with other articles on Docker, the project and product are referred to as "Docker," while the company is "Docker Inc."

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today's leftovers

  • Windows Btrfs Driver Updated With New Capabilities (WinBtrfs)
  • Install Laravel on Ubuntu 16.04
  • 'Tether' a very promising UE4 first-person adventure game will be coming to Linux
    It's not often a trailer leaves me begging for more, but 'Tether' [Steam Greenlight, Official Site] ticked all my boxes. The developer is using UE4 and claims the Linux builds are working as expected.
  • If you're in the mood for a decent Zombie survival game, don't pass up on Project Zomboid
    Project Zomboid [Steam, GOG, Official Site] is the rather good sandbox Zombie survival game from The Indie Stone, and it has come a long way! It doesn't have a SteamOS icon on Steam, as Valve removed it a long time ago as it (and a bunch of other games) wouldn't launch correctly on SteamOS. It works perfectly fine on a normal Linux distribution and I assure you the Linux version is still on Steam and perfectly up to date.
  • GTK+ 3.22.2 Deprecates APIs That Will Be Removed in GTK+ 4, Improves Win32 Theme
    Today, October 24, 2016, the GTK+ development team released the second stable maintenance update to the GTK+ 3.22 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for GNOME-based desktop environments. GTK+ 3.22.2 comes just two weeks after the release of GNOME 3.22.1 and in time for the upcoming GNOME 3.22.2 milestone, which will also be the last one pushed for the GNOME 3.22 series. GTK+ 3.22.2 is mostly a bugfix release, but also adds various improvements to the win32 theme and deprecates APIs (Application Programming Interface) that'll be removed in the next major branch, GTK+ 4.
  • No One Is Buying Smartwatches Anymore
    Remember how smartwatches were supposed to be the next big thing? About that... The market intelligence firm IDC reported on Monday that smartwatch shipments are down 51.6 percent year-over-year for the third quarter of 2016. This is bad news for all smartwatch vendors (except maybe Garmin), but it’s especially bad for Apple, which saw shipments drop 71.6 percent, according to the IDC report Apple is still the overall smartwatch market leader, with an estimated 41.3-percent of the market, but IDC estimates it shipped only 1.1 million Apple Watches in Q3 2016, compared with 3.9 million in 2015. To a degree, that’s to be expected, since the new Apple Watch Series 2 came out at the tail-end of the quarter. But the news is still a blow, when you consider how huge the Apple Watch hype was just 18 months ago.
  • 10 must-have Android apps for Halloween
  • What’s wrong with Git? A conceptual design analysis
    We finished up last week talking about the how to find good concepts / abstractions in a software design and what good modularization looks like. Today’s paper jumps 40+ years to look at some of those issues in a modern context and a tool that many readers of this blog will be very familiar with: Git. With many thanks to Glyn Normington for the recommendation. [...] The results of the reworking are made available in a tool called gitless, which I’ve installed on my system to try out for a few days. (Note: if you use oh-my-zsh with the git plugin then this defines an alias for gl which you’ll need to unalias). As of this paper (2013), Gitless was only just beginning as a project, but it continues to this day and tomorrow we’ll look at the 2016 paper that brings the story up to date. The kinds of concepts the authors are interested in are those which are essential to the design, to an understanding of the workings of the system, and hence will be apparent in the external interface of the system, as well as in the implementation.