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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • 3 Awesome Complete Open Source Mail Servers Solutions For Linux and UNIX servers

    Most mail servers made of Mail delivery agent (MDA) and Mail Transfer Agents (MTA). MDA software used to routes e-mail to its destination. You use MDA such as Dovecot, Qpopper, Courier, and Cyrus IMAP/POP3 servers. MTA software used to transfers e-mail between servers or computers. You use MTA such as Exim, Qmail, Sendmail, OpenSMTPD, Postfix, and others. Apart from MTA and MDA, you need to install and use Antispam, Antivirus, Webmail and other software too. You need to make sure your IP address stay clean. Apart from mail server software configuration, you need to install some database to store user names, email IDs, password and other information. Setting up and maintaining a full-fledged email server is a complicated task. You need to be a technology expert and a good sysadmin to set it up.

  • FreeType 2.8 Completes OpenType Variation Fonts Support

    FreeType 2.8 has been released and this version brings some big features to this widely-used open-source font engine.

    FreeType 2.8 marks the completion of OpenType Variation Fonts support. The last missing pieces of OpenType Variation Fonts support was completed for v2.8.

  • COPR for Xfce - 4.13 development packages

    Xfce 4.13 is the development version leading to Xfce 4.14. I have setup a COPR repository for Xfce 4.13 packages. This COPR provides packages for Rawhide, Fedora 26 and Fedora 25.

  • Bookmarks for Nextcloud 0.10.0 released

    I am happy to announce the availability of Bookmarks for Nextcloud 0.10.0! Bookmarks is a simple way to manage the remarkable websites and pages you come across on the Internet. Bookmarks 0.10.0 provides API methods to create, read, update and delete your bookmarks as well as compatibility with upcoming Nextcloud 12, next to smaller improvements and fixes.

  • Firebird 3.0.2 Package is uploaded into Firebird 3.0 ppa.

    There are packages for Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty ), 16.10 (Yakkety) , 16.04 LTS (Xenial) and 14.04 LTS (Trusty).

  • OnlyOffice: Another Free Office Suite For Linux

    When someone mentions a “free office suite”, probably the first name would be the famous LibreOffice. Which is – indeed – one of the best free office suites out there. However, there are a lot of other alternatives which you can try.

    OnlyOffice is another cross-platform office suite which offers solutions to create, edit and view many different documents formats. It’s free and licensed under the AGPL 3.0 license. Check the code on GitHub.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.3 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Leftovers: Software (Ebook Authoring Tools, Feedreader, and Wire)

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Software
  • Top 5 Ebook Authoring Tools for Linux

    Ebooks are quickly becoming the most popular publication medium for books. More people than ever are buying their books in digital form, and ebooks open up an invaluable opportunity for publishers and self-published authors alike. ebooks are even a popular tool for inbound marketing and lead generation.

    If you want to create your own ebook in Linux, you have some excellent options, and they’re all free (both as in beer and freedom) and open source.

    These aren’t in any particular order. They’re all great, and you should choose the one that best fits your use case and style.

  • Is Feedreader the Best RSS Reader for Ubuntu?

    Many people still read the news from RSS feeds, using services like Feedly, Feedbin and Old Reader to fetch, read and sync content between devices – myself very much included. Feedreader is a desktop RSS reader for Ubuntu and other Linux desktops. It has a clean, straightforward design with a three-panel layout.

  • Wire – A Secure Open Source Chat Application for Linux Systems

    We have covered many VoIP applications in past like Skype, Ring, Viber, etc. Today we are going to cover about wire. Wire is another VoIP applications which has full end-to-end encryption and best alternative for Skype users since Skype doesn’t offer all the features which is available for Windows and there is no proper updates for Linux too.

Wine 2.8

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Software

Multimedia: Recording Audio, VLC Media Player 2.2.5, OpenShot 2.3.2

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Software
  • A simple command-line tool for recording audio

    Machine learning and natural language processing are transforming our relationship with our devices by giving them a human voice. People with visual impairments have especially benefited from these technologies, but those who speak languages like my native Odia have largely been left behind by most voicebanks.

    When T. Shrinivasan, a Tamil-language Wikipedian, started the Voice-recorder-for-tawictionary, he probably didn't realize how useful his open source tool can be for users like me. I was in search of a simple tool that could allow me to record large chunks of words in a short time so that those recordings can be used on Odia Wiktionary, a sister project of Wikipedia and a free dictionary in Odia language that has translations of Odia and other language words.

  • VLC Media Player 2.2.5 Improves Video Scaling in VDPAU, MP3 Playback, and More

    VLC 2.2.5 arrived recently with a great number of improvements over the previous stable update of the open-source, free and cross-platform video player application for GNU/Linux, macOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    In fact, it's been almost a year since VLC 2.2.4 was announced back in early June 2016, and users can now finally update their beloved media player to a newer version that has quite a number of improvements. For example, VLC 2.2.5 improves the MP3 playback quality when the libmad library is used, as well as VDPAU video scalling and the playback of palettized codecs.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Open-Source Video Editor Is Out, Addresses a Few Important Issues

    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas today announced the release and immediate availability of the first public maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform video editor.

    OpenShot 2.3 arrived at the end of March 2017 as "one of the biggest updates ever" of the popular and free video editor software that's used with success by many videographers and vloggers on the Open Source community, but also by any home user who wants to edit his/her vacation movies.

Text and Video Editors: WordPress, Atom, and VidCutter

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Software
  • The WordPress Desktop App Is Blazingly Fast, But It’s Not For Me

    Are you a blogger? If so you may be interested to know that the open-source WordPress desktop app is now available as a Snap app. Released on Linux...

  • You Can Now Install the Atom Hackable Text Editor as a Snap on Ubuntu Linux

    Canonical's David Callé is informing the Ubuntu community today that the Atom open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor loved by numerous developers can now be installed in Ubuntu Linux as a Snap.

    Mark Shuttleworth promised to focus on advancing the develop of the Snappy technologies, which allow user to install Snap packages across multiple Linux-based operating systems, so we should see more and more popular apps packaged as Snaps.

  • 3 types of useful Atom text editor packages for writers

    Text editors aren't just something developers use to crank out code. Writers use them, too. A good text editor enables writers to focus on their words, but also packs other features that help them craft and publish their work more efficiently.

    While popular among the techies, GitHub's Atom text editor has evolved into a solid editor for writers, too. That's thanks to Atom's 6,100+ packages, which greatly extend the editor's capabilities.

    Let's look at three types of packages for the Atom text editor that writers of all stripes will find useful.

  • Open-Source Video Trimmer App VidCutter Scores Big Update

    A big update to VidCutter, an open-source video trim, split and merge app, is available to download. VidCutter is a cross-platform Qt5 app for quick video trimming/splitting and merging video clips without the need to re-encode. The app is powered by FFmpeg, which available on almost all major Linux distributions.

OpenShot 2.3.2

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Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released

    Version 2.3.2 has been released this evening, and it addresses a few big issues.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Video Editor Released

    OpenShot 2.3.2 fixes a crash during undo/redo operations, another crash was fixed with the transform tool, better libopenshot version handling, a smaller package size, and a variety of other fixes.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released with Various Bug Fixes

    A new release of the open-source video editor OpenShot is available to download. The update fixes 'a few big issues', according to its developer.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

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Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Native color temperature tweaking with Night Light

    RedShift is a utility that we have previously featured here at the Fedora Magazine. It is a small utility that automatically tweaks the color temperature towards the red end of the spectrum after dark. Blue light — which is typically emitted by a monitor — is shown to negatively impact sleep patterns if you are exposed to it after dark. Night Light is a new feature arriving in Fedora 26 Workstation — thanks to it being introduced in GNOME 3.24. Night Light provides the functionality of RedShift without having to install a separate utility or extension.

  • Transfer.sh – Easy And Fast Way to Share Files From The Command-Line
  • What is YOUR Essential FOSS Program?

    We all have at least one or maybe even a handful of programs we seemingly just can't live without. You know, that program that you instantly go looking for as soon as you've installed your new shiny OS (or Linux distribution, more specifically in our case). For me, personally it's the Vim text editor.

    I decided to narrow this down to Free and Open Source Software specifically, as while it's probably not necessary given our audience, it's always possible someone would jump up and say something like 'Adobe Illustrator' is their most essential tool! Which is fine in itself, some people do depend on such tools for their occupation or hobbies.

  • GCC 6/7 Gets A Performance-Sensitive Fix

    A Phoronix reader pointed out a performance regression fix now available for GCC 6 and GCC 7 that could help some rather trivial C code perform much better.

  • Cockpit is now just an apt install away
  • Cockpit Comes To Ubuntu, Easier Linux Server Administration

    Cockpit, the open-source project providing a pleasant web-based administrative interface to Linux systems and developed significantly by Red Hat / Fedora developers, is now officially available in Ubuntu and Debian.

    Cockpit is now available in Debian unstable as well as Ubuntu 17.04 and 17.10 repositories. Details on Cockpit coming to Ubuntu/Debian were shared today on Martin Pitt's blog, a prominent Debian/Ubuntu developer. There is also work on getting the Cockpit packages added to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS backports, but as of writing that has yet to be completed.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Coreboot 4.6 Released
  • 4 terminal applications with great command-line UIs

    In this article, I'll look at a shortcoming of command-line interfaces—discoverability—and a few ways to overcome this problem.

    I love command lines. My first command line was DOS 6.2, back in 1997. I learned the syntax for various commands and showed off how to list hidden files in a directory (attrib). I would carefully craft my commands one character at a time. When I made a mistake, I would proceed to retype the command from the beginning. One fine day someone showed me how to traverse the history using the up and down arrow keys and I was blown away.

  • KStars 2.7.7 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.7.7 for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    In this release, Robert Lancaster dedicated a lot of time to improving KStars What's Interesting Tool (WIT). It is now significantly improved and offers a rich educational experience to explore the heavens! Users can now explore many naked eye and deep sky objects, in addition to addon catalogs offered by KStars such as the Sharpless Catalog.

    Users wishing to have more fine control on what objects to observe and/or image should be using the Observation Planner that enable filtering of objects with custom constraints and limits. For casual users looking to find out what's interesting tonight, then this tool is the optimal choice.

  • Evolution 3.24.2 Open-Source Email and Groupware Client Brings Many Improvements

    The GNOME Project is preparing these days to release the second and last scheduled point release for the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, and some of the core components and apps are already receiving new versions.

    That's right, we're talking about GNOME 3.24.2, which should be out in the coming days, around the date of May 10, 2017, bringing various small enhancements and bug fixes to some of the components distributed as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack. The Evolution email and groupware client is, again, among the first to be updated.

  • System76 Preps Consistent GNOME Experience for Their PCs Powered by Ubuntu 17.10

    System76's CEO Carl Richell is reporting today on some of the upcoming changes the Linux hardware company plans to make in regards to the look and feel of the GNOME desktop environment shipping with the next major Ubuntu release.

    As you are very much aware by now, Canonical is moving away from their unique and gorgeous Unity user interface to the GNOME 3 desktop environment for the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release later this year on October 19, 2017.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Yup, This is The Best Sound Converter for Ubuntu

    Though I tend to stream music from the cloud when at my desktop PC, I prefer to download and play local audio files when listening to podcasts and audio books on the move. Earlier this week I needed convert a stack of old audio books from the .m4a format to a more Android-friendly format like .mp3 — and SoundConverter did what I needed effortlessly.

  • Aptik Let You Organize Your Favorite PPAs and Manage Packages Easily

    There are few standard ways to manage sources in Linux operating system, from command-line which can be difficult for some new users and built-in GUI way doesn't offers much (beside add and remove PPA). Aptik application first introduced in 2014 which made its way in community fairly easily. If you use standard version of Ubuntu and have many PPAs added in your system and you want to upgrade then this tools comes very handy and let you upgrade your OS quite easily, once you upgrade the OS you can re-install all the packages which were removed before upgrade or you can choose your strategy for upgrade process. Not only for upgrade, if you have another system that run Linux and you want to transfer packages from one to another then in that case it can be very useful tool.

  • Meet the authors of WikiToLearn: Daniele Pannozzo
  • QtWebKit is coming back (part 2)
  • GNOME Recipes App to Soon Offer More Recipes, Cuisines, and Inline Editing

    GNOME Project's Matthias Clasen is reporting on the development of the recently introduced GNOME Recipes application, an open-source and easy-to-use program that'll help you to discover what to cook.

    GNOME Recipes has been in development during the GNOME 3.24 cycle, with which it was first introduced to the public in its final, production-ready state. The graphical user interface of the app should be very familiar to GNOME users as it resemblance the look and feel of the GNOME Software package manager.

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BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

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Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS