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Software

Applications: Suplemon, AV, Joplin

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Software
  • Suplemon - Modern CLI Text Editor with Multi Cursor Support

    Suplemon is a modern text editor for CLI that emulates the multi cursor behavior and other features of Sublime Text. It's lightweight and really easy to use, just as Nano is.

    One of the benefits of using a CLI editor is that you can use it whether the Linux distribution that you're using has a GUI or not. This type of text editors also stands out as being simple, fast and powerful.

  • Linux antivirus and anti malware: 8 top tools
  • Joplin is an Open-Source Evernote Alternative

    If you’re looking for an open-source Evernote alternative that works on Linux (and everywhere else) you need look no further than Joplin.

    Joplin is a free, open-source note-taking and to-do app with desktop clients for Linux, Windows, macOS, and mobile apps for Android and iOS. There’s even a CLI too.

    In this post we’ll look at its key features, and suggest a few reasons why you may prefer to use it over other similar services.

Wine 3.0 Plan

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Software
  • The Features To Look Forward To With Wine 3.0

    Yesterday it was confirmed that Wine 3.0 will enter its code freeze next week and begin with the release candidates until the official v3.0.0 milestone is ready sometime around mid-January. Here's a recap of all the Wine developments for 2017 if you are curious about all the features and improvements to be found in this big update.

    Among the changes that built up in the Wine 2.x unstable bi-weekly snapshots ahead of the official Wine 3.0 stable debut include:

  • Wine 3.0 RC1 should be out in early December, final release likely in January

    Alexandre Julliard has put out his plans for the release of the next major version of Wine and it's going to be quite soon.

    The next release, due around December 8th, will be the first Release Candidate for Wine 3.0. From there, they will be doing weekly RC releases and he estimates this will last 4-6 weeks. So the final Wine 3.0 release should be due in January if all goes well and no major release blockers are found.

Software: TLDR, Notes-Up, Bashhub, Mozilla, LibreOffice and GNU libmicrohttpd

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  • TLDR summarizes Linux commands

    TLDR is a free command line utility for various Linux distributions that provides you with summaries of Linux commands on request.

    Linux commands can be quite intimidating, especially if you are a new user. While you may use the man command to get information on a particular command, man descriptions are often not the easiest to go through.

  • Notes-Up – A Markdown Note Editor & Manager for Elementary OS

    Notes Up is an open-source notes editor and manager aimed at Elementary OS. Its main attractions include a minimalist User Interface, an intuitive Markdown editor, support for keyboard shortcuts, dragging and dropping images, plugin extensions, and exporting notes to PDF.

    Although Notes-Up is aimed at Elementary OS, it is available for openSUSE and users of other Linux distros are free to try it out via its PPA.

  • Bashhub – Access Your Terminal History From Anywhere

    As you already know, all commands you run on your shell will be saved and you can view them at any time either by using history command or using UP/Down arrows keys or doing a reverse search using CTRL+R key combination from the Terminal. All commands that you run on the Terminal will be saved in .bash_history file. But you can view, access, and re-run them only from the same machine itself. What if you want to access your Terminal history from a different system on the network? No problem! Here is where “Bashhub” utility comes in help. It is a simple online web service where you can save all commands and access them from anywhere. Bashhub saves every commands entered across all sessions and systems, so you can access them from anywhere. To put this simply, your entire BASH history will be available in the cloud and the entire bash history is indexed, and searchable! Bashhub is completely free and open source.

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  • Mozilla's WebRender Making Good Progress, Can Be Tested On Firefox Nightly

    Mozilla engineers aren't letting up after their Quantum work in Firefox 57 that made the browser much faster. Next they have been improving WebRender and can be tested easily with Firefox Nightly.

    WebRender as a reminder is Mozilla's GPU-based renderer used currently within the Servo engine and has also been fitted into Firefox with Gecko. Those unfamiliar with WebRender can learn more about its architecture on their GitHub Wiki and this Mozilla Hacks blog post from last month.

  • LibreOffice Is Now Available on Flathub, the Flatpak App Store

    Its arrival allows anyone running a modern Linux distribution to install the latest stable release of LibreOffice in a click or two, without having to hunt down a PPA, tussle with tarballs or wait for a distro provider to package it up.

    A LibreOffice Flatpak has been available for users to download and install since August of last year and the LibreOffice 5.2 release.

    What’s “new” here is the distribution method. Rather than release updates through their own dedicated server The Document Foundation has opted to use Flathub.

  • Dialog Tunnelling

    I’m simply going to talk about what I’ve been currently working on in Collabora Online or LibreOffice Online, as part of my job at Collabora.

  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 released
  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.57 Brings Significant Improvements

    The libmicrohttpd GNU project is the C library that makes it easy to run an HTTP web-server as part of another application while being as small as about ~32k compiled.

Software: Trello, Brisk Menu, LibreOffice

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Software
  • How to Get the Trello Desktop Client on Linux

    There’s no doubt that Trello is a great program. It helps both teams and individuals become more productive. The program emulates the experience of using Post-it notes to track the progress of work. It has quickly become one of the de facto tools in doing collaborative work and managing personal projects as well.

    Trello is available for web, mobile (App Store and Google Play), and desktop (Mac and Windows). It supports most platforms. However, there isn’t a Linux desktop version from the creators, which is too bad for the Linux users. Luckily, there’s a fix, thanks to generous Daniel Chatfield.

    Remember, this is not an official desktop client. It was only built by a generous person for Linux users who love Trello. The program is hosted on this GitHub page. Let’s go through the installation process step by step.

  • Brisk Menu – An Efficient Menu for the MATE Desktop

    Brisk Menu is an open-source menu designed for the Mate desktop environment which usually ships with Solus OS as its default menu applet. That notwithstanding, Brisk has functionalities on its own e.g. a built-in search feature that simulates the Windows start menu while still providing optimum performance.

    It features an adaptive UI which is themeable and put pressure on your battery and memory that is friendly and this comes to me as no surprise especially after learning that Brisk-menu is a collaborative project between Solus and Ubuntu MATE.

  • LibreOffice 6.0 Beta Available - Huge Open-Source Office Suite Update For 2018

    Today the branching of LibreOffice 6.0 from Git master took place as well as tagging the first beta.

    LibreOffice 6.0 Beta is currently available in source form as of writing and the code will continue to be refined via the libreoffice-6-0 branch until it's ready for release in early 2018. The mainline LibreOffice Git code meanwhile is bumped for early work on what's marked as LibreOffice 6.1.

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

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Software
  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements

    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.

  • TeX Live Cockpit

    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.

  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client

    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring.

    Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.

  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics

    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!

  • Products Over Projects

    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.

  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

Wine 2.22 Release and More

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.22 is now available.

  • Wine 2.22 Brings Improved 64-bit ARM Support

    Wine 2.22 is now available as the latest development release of this program to run Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Changes with this bi-weekly development release include a source selection dialog for scanners, improvements to ARM64 (AArch64 / 64-bit ARM) support, float audio formats with more than two channels in XAudio, fixes for DLL injection handling, input method improvements, and bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.22 is out with input improvements, XAudio improvements and a fix for The Witcher 3

    Wine 2.22 is now officially available as the latest development release on the road to the official Wine 3.0 release.

  • Using ‘Wine’ to Run Windows Games on Linux

    More and more people are switching to Linux. Why? Perhaps they’re seeking refuge from the flawed Windows operating systems. And Linux is becoming more accessible, partly because it can now provide much of what Windows can offer.

    Many apps have Linux alternatives. Microsoft Office, for example, can be replaced by LibreOffice. There are also 1,000s of games now available for Linux on Steam, and this number is increasing all the time.

    Yet every now and then, Windows users might still need an app that isn’t available on Linux or want to play a game that doesn’t have a Linux version. In these cases, they can use Wine to run whatever Windows programs they still need.

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

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Software

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series.

VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs.

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Applications: Snapcraft, Cutegram, LaTeX Editors, Spreadsheet Editors (Like Calc), Vivaldi

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Software

Software and Development: CodeBlocks, Cumulonimbus, LibreOffice, devRantron, GCC

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Development
Software
  • CodeBlocks – A Free & Cross-Platform C, C++ and Fortran IDE

    CodeBlocks is a free and open-source IDE for C, C++ and FORTRAN development. It features a consistent User Interface across all desktop platforms with a class browser, a tabbed interface, and its functions can be extended using plugins.

    It also features keyboard shortcuts, smart indentation, code folding, and a to-do list management panel that different users can use, among others. It is written in C++ and it does not require any interpreted languages or proprietary libraries.

  • Cumulonimbus: Terrible Name, Terrific Podcast Client

    Unlike many other Electron podcast apps I have come across on Github this one is still being developed, is easy to install, and it supports Linux.

  • LibreOffice Calc Is Finally Being Threaded

    While LibreOffice Calc for a while now has been offering OpenCL support for speeding up spreadsheet computations, with not all drivers/GPUs supporting OpenCL, this Microsoft Office alternative is finally receiving proper multi-threading support.

    Collabora developers have landed their initial work on multi-threading / parallelism as they look to speed-up the LibreOffice Calc spreadsheet program's calculations.

  • devRantron – An Unofficial Desktop Client for devRant Programmers

    devRantron is a free, open-source, and cross-platform (unofficial) desktop client for the famous Dev Rant Android and iOS social media application for programmers, developers, and designers.

    Before now, devRant was only accessible on the mobile phones, but now users can post complaints and follow up on rants by developers from all around the globe even while working on their desktops and it’s thanks to a group of friends who concluded that devRant was taking too long to deliver a desktop client.

  • The New Compiler Features & Changes Of GCC 8

    With GCC 8 feature development over and onto bug fixing, here is a look at some of the changes to find with the GCC 8 compiler stack that will be released as stable early next year in the form of GCC 8.1.

Software and Games Leftovers

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Software
Gaming
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Android/ChromeOS/Google Leftovers

Games: SC-Controller 0.4.2, Campo Santo, Last Epoch and More

Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more