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Software

Lollypop Music Player Sweetens its UI with Responsive Design

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Software

But GTK fans needn’t feel like they’re missing out. Lollypop — arguably the best modern desktop music player for GNOME — is working on a responsive design too.

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Software: AMP, Catfish, RVowpalWabbit, Digest

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Software
  • AMP - Fully Featured Text Editor for Linux Terminal

    Amp is a complete text editor for your terminal, which is inspired by vim's modal approach to text editing. Amp aims to keep things as simple as possible (SAP). There are already plenty of highly-configurable editors available. At its core, amp aims to minimize configuration and provide a great out-of-the-box experience.

    As you already know vim editor similarly, Amp is a modal editor: keystrokes perform different functions based on the current mode. Many familiar modes (insert, normal, select, etc.) are available, as well as several new ones providing additional functionality. In this article, we show you how to install amp tool on ubuntu and arch Linux.

  • Sean Davis: Catfish 1.4.4 Released

    I’ve got some great news for fans of Catfish, the fast and powerful graphical search utility for Linux. The latest version, 1.4.4, has arrived with performance improvements and tons of localization updates!

  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.11
  • digest 0.6.15

Software: libvpx 1.7.0, GNU Binutils, Prometheus, Fuzzing

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Software
  • Libvpx 1.7.0 Released With AVX Optimizations & More

    Google's WebM folks quietly released libvpx 1.7.0 earlier this week as the latest version of their VP8/VP9 encoder/decoder library.

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  • FSF Binutils release 2.30 now available
  • GNU Binutils 2.30 Released

    Released this weekend is Binutils 2.30 as the latest collection of these GNU utilities important to the open-source ecosystem.

  • Monitoring with Prometheus 2.0

    Prometheus is a monitoring tool built from scratch by SoundCloud in 2012. It works by pulling metrics from monitored services and storing them in a time series database (TSDB). It has a powerful query language to inspect that database, create alerts, and plot basic graphs. Those graphs can then be used to detect anomalies or trends for (possibly automated) resource provisioning. Prometheus also has extensive service discovery features and supports high availability configurations. That's what the brochure says, anyway; let's see how it works in the hands of an old grumpy system administrator. I'll be drawing comparisons with Munin and Nagios frequently because those are the tools I have used for over a decade in monitoring Unix clusters.

  • A survey of some free fuzzing tools

    Many techniques in software security are complicated and require a deep understanding of the internal workings of the computer and the software under test. Some techniques, though, are conceptually simple and do not rely on knowledge of the underlying software. Fuzzing is a useful example: running a program with a wide variety of junk input and seeing if it does anything abnormal or interesting, like crashing. Though it might seem unsophisticated, fuzzing is extremely helpful in finding the parsing and input processing problems that are often the beginning of a security vulnerability.

    Many common types of security vulnerabilities occur when something goes wrong while processing input — for example, the classic buffer overflow. These are interesting in that they tend to manifest first as instability: when input too long for the buffer is read, the program will probably misbehave and simply crash. With careful design of the too-long input, it might be possible to turn this crash into arbitrary code execution. The goal of fuzzing is to find any situations where a program crashes due to unusual input. While fixing these bugs makes the software more stable, it also closes the door on any security issues that could result from them.

Software: GNOME To Do, VirtualBox, Plasma Mobile

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Software
  • Ubuntu 18.04 Includes a New Desktop App

    When you boot up Ubuntu 18.04 LTS ‘Bionic Beaver’ later this year you’ll find a brand new app is installed by default.

    It’s called ‘GNOME To Do’ and it is, as you might have guessed, a ‘personal task manager’ designed for the GNOME desktop.

  • VirtualBox 5.2 overview - A nice, practical facelift

    Every few months, there's a major VirtualBox update, bringing in a range of visible changes and improvements to this handy, free hypervisor product. I'm an old time user, and have written about VirtualBox many times in the past. Recently, I had the chance to test the new version, 5.2 (actually 5.2.2).

    The official list of enhancements is quite impressive - the GUI now features revamped virtual media and host network managers, easier snapshot management, and unattended guest installations. Sounds neat. So let us see what gives.

  • How do I test Plasma Mobile? (part 1)

    Last week we asked the Free Software community what they wanted to do to help us move forward with Plasma Mobile.

Software: OCS Store and Movit 1.6

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Software
  • OCS Store: One Stop Shop All of Your Linux Software Customization Needs

    One of the biggest selling points of desktop Linux, for me, is the centralized software distribution system. Ubuntu has Apt, Arch Linux has Pacman and Fedora’s got RPM. This centralized distribution means an increased stability, a superior integration between the apps and the operating system, and an enhanced security factor.

  • Movit 1.6 Released For GPU-Based Video Filter Library

    Movit, the "Modern Video Toolkit", that aims to provide high-quality, high-performance GPU-based video filters is out with a new release.

    The Movit 1.6 release today by Steinar Gunderson adds support for video effects that work as compute shaders. Gunderson's hopes for using more compute shaders in Movit didn't work out quite as planned with fragment shaders geberally being faster for this use-case. But this release does have compute shaders for deinterlacing as one area where it's faster.

  • Movit 1.6.0 released

    I just released version 1.6.0 of Movit, my GPU-based video filter library.

    The full changelog is below, but what's more interesting is maybe what isn't in it, namely the compute shader version of the high-quality resampling filter I blogged about earlier. It turned out that my benchmark setup was wrong in a sort-of subtle way, and unfortunately biased towards the compute shader. Fixing that negated the speed difference—it was actually usually a few percent slower than the fragment shader version, despite a fair amount of earlier tweaks. (It did use less CPU when setting up new parameters, which was nice for things like continuous zooms, but probably not enough to justify the GPU slowdown.)

    Which means that after a month or so of testing and performance tuning, I had to scrap it—it's sad to notice so late (I only realized that something was wrong as I started writing up the final documentation, and figured I couldn't actually justify why I would let one of them chain with other effects and the other one not), but it's a sunk cost, and keeping it in based on known-bad benchmarks would have helped nobody. I've left it in a git branch in case the world should change.

Software: COPR, Cockpit, Curl, Taskcluster, MKVToolNix

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Software
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for January

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • Cockpit 160

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 160.

  • Cheers for curl 7.58.0

    curl 7.58.0 is the 172nd curl release and it contains, among other things, 82 bug fixes thanks to 54 contributors (22 new). All this done with 131 commits in 56 days.

  • Time’s up to shut up and sign up for curl up

    We have just opened up the registration site for curl up 2018, the annual curl developers meeting that this year takes place in Stockholm, Sweden, over the weekend April 14-15. There’s a limited number of seats available, so if you want to join in the fun it might be a good idea to decide early on.

  • Taskcluster To Date

    Taskcluster has always been open source: all of our code is on Github, and we get lots of contributions to the various repositories. Some of our libraries and other packages have seen some use outside of a Taskcluster context, too.

  • MKVToolNix 20.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulator Released with Important Changes

    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus released a major version of his open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms.

    MKVToolNix 20.0 is an important release that comes with major changes at code and functionality end. These include the removal of numerous deprecated functions, implementation of the cmark library as a new requirement for package maintainers, and the complete rewrite of mkvinfo’s internals.

10 Best Text Editors For Linux And Programming (2018 Edition)

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Development
GNU
Linux
Software

The year 2018 is here. Just in case you’re looking for some powerful text editor for Linux to kickstart programming new year, you’re at the right place. While the debate of the best programming editors for Linux won’t end anytime soon, there are many editors that bring an impressive set of features. While Vim, Emacs, and Nano are older and dependable players in the game, Atom, Brackets, and Sublime Text are relatively newer text editors.

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Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

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Software
  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal

    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.

  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux

    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.

  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms

    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on.

    Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.

  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively

    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’.

    The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS.

    The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

Slack as a Snap

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Software
Ubuntu
  • In a Snap, Slack Comes to Linux. Here's How To Install It

    While binaries for Slack have been available for Ubuntu and Fedora, other Linux operating systems are not so lucky. To overcome this, Canonical has released Slack as a Snap, which allows Slack to be installed and used on a greater variety of Linux distributions.

    Snapcraft is a command line tool that allows you to install containerised applications called Snaps on many different Linux distribution. As these Snap containers contain all the required dependencies that a program needs to run, it makes it very easy to create and distribute a single container that works on a variety of Linux versions.

  • Linux Users Can Now Download Slack as a ‘Snap’

    Slack is one step closer to becoming the workplace staple for businesses across the globe. The software is now available for use on Linux environments, bundled as a Snap – an application package for opensource systems.

    Tens of millions of users across the world run Linux on their systems, opting for one among its many distribution avatars. In comparison, Slack reported that over 6 million active profiles used the app daily last year, 2 million of them with paid subscriptions. The new release could open Slack up to a whole new set of customers.

  • Slack has arrived on Linux thanks to Canonical Snap

    CANONICAL HAS made the wishes of its users come true again as it brings another major app to Linux users for the first time.

    This time it's popular team platform Slack. The secret sauce is Ubuntu's "Snap" packages, a form of containerisation which puts an app into a little bubble that makes it run in the Linux environment. At Christmas, the technique was used to bring a desktop Spotify to Linux for the first time.

    The important thing here is that Snaps, first launched in 2016, run on any Linux distro, not just Canonical's own Ubuntu. Named specifically were Linux Mint, Manjaro, Debian, ArchLinux, OpenSUSE and Solus. Not only that, they work across desktop, server, cloud and IoT.

Press Coverage About Wine 3.0

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Microsoft
Software
  • Windows apps on Linux: Wine 3.0 is out now with Direct3D 10, 11 support

    Wine 3.0 is now available to help you run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS, and BSD systems.

    Wine -- or 'Wine is Not an Emulator' -- is a compatibility layer that implements the Windows API on top of Unix and Linux, to help you run Windows apps when needed.

    Currently, about 25,000 applications are compatible with Wine, with the most popular all being games, including Final Fantasy XI, Team Fortress 2, EVE, and StarCraft.

  • Wine 3.0 is here to run Windows software on your Linux box

    When people make the switch from Windows to Linux, they often experiment with Wine. If you aren’t familiar, it is a compatibility layer that can sometimes get Windows software to run on Linux and BSD. I say "sometimes" because it isn’t a flawless experience. In fact, it can be quite frustrating to use. I suggest using native Linux software as an alternative, but understandably, that isn’t always possible.

    If you depend on Wine, or want to start trying it out, I am happy to say that version 3.0 is finally available. It is quite the significant update too, as it features over 6,000 changes!

  • Have three WINEs this weekend, because WINE 3.0 has landed

    Version 3.0 of Wine Is Not an Emulator – aka WINE – has arrived, and offers all sorts of new emulation-on-Android possibilities.

    WINE lets users run Windows applications on Linux, MacOS, Solaris, and FreeBSD, plus other POSIX-compliant operating system. To do so it “translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly”, an arrangement its developers rate as more efficient than virtualization while “allowing you to cleanly integrate Windows applications into your desktop.”

  • Wine 3.0 Released To Run Windows Apps On Linux Efficiently — Download It Here

    Just recently, we told you that the support for Linux distros in VirtualBox is about to get a lot better with the release of Linux kernel 4.16. But, what if you wish to run Windows apps on your host Linux system? For that, Wine has got your back.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0. Read more