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today's leftovers

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Leftovers: Software

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Software

Quod Libet 3.2.1 Review – An Almost Perfect Music Player

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Software
Reviews

It's a mystery why Quod Libet is not a more popular media player. It's been around for years and the developers have constantly worked on it. The last major update was done back in May 2014, and the software is stable and full of goodies.

Quodlibet is a Latin phrase that means "what pleases" and it's used in music to describe a piece that's a combination of multiple melodies. The name seems to relate very well to the media player and it's actually quite catchy.

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Simplenote want developers to make a GNU/Linux implementation

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GNU
Linux
Software

Matt Mullenweg founder and CEO of Automattic which is responsible for WordPress.com has reached out to people who develop software on the GNU/Linux platform to find someone who will bring the Simplenote application to GNU/Linux.

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Emacs & the obsessive email mongerer

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Development
Software

I had already mentioned in passing here that I am using Emacs for a variety of tasks: outline, project management and planning with Org-Mode, IRC (go figure, my default email client on all my machines is Emacs’ ERC), notes editing or quick scribbling with the Scartch buffer (happens to me all day long), and regularly, albeit less frequently than in 2013, various editing of html pages, javascript and sometimes even Python when I dare to edit one or two things in Python scripts. A consequence of all these use cases is that I have Emacs open almost everyday on almost any of my machines.

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Chrome 38 Beta: New primitives for the next-generation web

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Google
Software
Web

Today’s Chrome Beta channel release includes a ton of new primitives and APIs to simplify development and give developers more control over their web applications. Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to Chrome for Android, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

35 Great Android Apps for Road Warriors

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Android
Software

So you’re a road warrior – that means you need to move fast and seamlessly across vast distances totally hassle-free. Gotcha. Here are the Android apps you’ll need to make your travels as fast and trouble-free as a “Beam me up, Scotty” command. No, there’s no transporter yet, but these apps are definitely the next best thing. And yes, there are Android apps here to help you get work done while you’re on the move too!

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Tux Paint: Doing FOSS Right

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Software

Apparently, I’m not alone in thinking highly of the software, if this page of testimonials is any indication. In fact, the publication “This Old Schoolhouse” recently echoed many other reviews in their article in the June 2012 edition. In the article, Andy Harris, the Tech Homeschooler, wrote, “Tux Paint is just about the most kid-friendly program I’ve ever seen. It’s designed so the adult can set it up, and even very young children can enjoy it thoroughly. It also has sophisticated enough features for siblings and parents to enjoy.”

Tux Paint is a project that does FOSS right: A wide-ranging team labors for the good of the program and consistently puts out quality software without fanfare or self-congratulation. The proof, as they say, is in the software itself: high-quality software which enjoys a high degree of acceptance with teachers and parents, to say nothing of holding the interest – and unlocking the creativity – of children.

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More in Tux Machines

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Android One: Let us fill you in on Google’s big game

India is now the world’s third largest Internet market and “on a bullet train to become the second”. But even when we become the second with around 300 million Internet users, India would still have over 75 per cent of the population that has no access to this so-called information superhighway. It is this chunk of population that will form the “next billion” which companies like Nokia, and now Google, has been talking about. And it is this next billion that Google thinks will line up to buy and good smartphone that is also affordable. Read more

Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more