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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • {New] Green Recorder
  • The Mach-O Transition: Darling in the Past 5 Years

    Darling has been under development for almost five years now, which invites the questions — what has happened over the past years, are we getting anywhere and when will we get there.

  • The Inkscape 0.92 release

    On January 4, the Inkscape project released the latest stable version of its open-source vector-graphics editor. Version 0.92 adds a new tool for creating flexible color gradients that can vary with almost arbitrary complexity and it adds new capabilities to many of its existing drawing tools. There are new features to be found in the set of bundled extensions and path effects, as well as important updates to font features and to the application's ability to tune the XML objects in a scalable vector graphics (SVG) file. There are also some changes to how Inkscape handles some core document properties, however — changes that are mandatory if Inkscape is to fully support the SVG specification, but that might trip up unsuspecting users.

    The 0.92 release was accompanied by a detailed set of release notes on the Inkscape wiki. The project has long required developers who check in new features to document those features in the upcoming release-notes page, an admirable practice that other free-software projects would do well to consider. If anything, the wiki page for a new release can veer toward being overly detailed but, on the other hand, there is never a last-minute scramble to write release notes from memory and risk accidentally leaving out something important.

  • Komorebi - Awesome Wallpapers Manager for Linux
  • Screenlets (Desktop Widgets) Fixed For Ubuntu 16.04, Available In PPA

    The Screenlets package was removed from the official Ubuntu 16.04 (and newer) repositories because it no longer worked, however, Hrotkó Gábor fixed various issues that prevented the application and some of its widgets from working, and uploaded a new version to the official Screenlets PPA, for Ubuntu 16.04.

    While the PPA doesn't officially support it, you can also use it in Ubuntu 16.10.

  • Top 7 Tools that can automate Linux Admin Task

    Puppet is an open source tool designed to make automation and reporting much easier for system administrators. It is basically a configuration management software that helps in configuring and maintaining your servers and other systems in your network. Generally, Server administrators spend a lot of time doing the same task again and again daily. They always wanted to automate these tasks, so as to get more time to work on other projects or learn new concepts and scripting languages. Tasks can be automated by writing scripts, but in companies with a larger network, scripts don’t come in handy.

  • Where has my disk space gone? Flame graphs for file systems

    My laptop was recently running low on available disk space, and it was a mystery as to why. I have different tools to explore the file system, including running the "find / -ls" command from a terminal, but they can be time consuming to use. I wanted a big picture view of space by directories, subdirectories, and so on.

  • LosslessCut Is An Easy To Use Video Cutter (Cross-Platform)

    According to its GitHub page, LosslessCut doesn't re-encode or decode the videos, making it very fast and especially useful for large videos.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • 5 of the Best Calendar Apps for Linux

    Finding a good calendar app for Linux is not as easy as, say, music or text editing software where there are several good options. That’s not to say there are no good options for calendar apps on Linux – you just have to do a bit more digging to find the right app.

    We’ve already done the heavy lifting for you, so here are five calendar applications in no particular order that can help you manage your schedule and give you good value on your Linux desktop.

  • Released Vivaldi Web Browser Stable 1.7 With Built-in Screenshot & All Tab Mute Options

    Everybody knows about a brand new web browser Vivaldi. Vivaldi is a feature-rich, modern web browser based on Chromium / Blink. Which was developed by Vivaldi Technologies, a company founded by Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner and Tatsuki Tomita.

  • FFmpeg 3.2.4 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Available for Download

    Just days after the release of the FFmpeg 3.2.3 maintenance update, the open-source multimedia framework received another point release, versioned 3.2.4, which appears to be a small one patching a handful of issues.

    FFmpeg 3.2.4 is the fourth update to the FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" stable series, and it's here to address a total of five reported bugs, including the clearing of ref_counts on redundant slices for h264_slice, a heap allocation wrap in both mov_read_uuid and mov_read_hdlr, a logic error pictordec, and setup of codecpar in add_codec().

  • Calibre 2.79 eBook Manager Adds Interactive Pop-Up for Connected Android Devices

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced today, February 10, 2017, the immediate availability for download of the Calibre 2.79 open-source ebook library management software for all supported platforms.

    Calibre 2.79 is here two weeks after the release of version 2.78, which introduced support for the newest Kobo firmware and many bug fixes. It's also a small release that only introduces a pop-up message to inform users when an Android device is connected.

  • A Lightweight Screen Recorder for Linux

    Want to record your Ubuntu desktop for a screencast, video tutorial, or bug report? I highly recommend giving Green Recorder a shot. Green Recorder is a minimal yet perfectly functional desktop screen recorder app for Ubuntu.

  • If You Remember Using These 5 Linux Apps, You’re Officially Old

    And after thinking about it for a while I figured I’d tap it out into a post because I reckon a few of the names that follow will bring back a memory or two for some of you too.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Atom 1.14

    A fundamental component of the text editor called the display layer has been redesigned to rely on a new data structure that is implemented in C++. These changes enable Atom to open larger files more quickly while using much less memory. Improvements in this area are ongoing, so expect more in upcoming releases.

  • Atom 1.14 Hackable Text Editor Launches with Improved Large File Performance

    GitHub's Ian Olsen is announcing today, February 8, 2017, the general availability of the Atom 1.14 open-source and multiplatform hackable text editor for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Launched exactly one month after the release of Atom 1.13, the new Atom 1.14 release does not appear to be a major milestone, as it only adds 64-bit installation support for Microsoft Windows operating systems, improved MRU tab traversal with a bunch of fixes, as well as large file performance across all platforms.

  • Why I Swapped VLC for MPV

    In fact, if I were to you all what video player you use on Ubuntu I’d be cowered by the collective cry of ‘VLC’!

    And quite right too. VLC is open-source, obscenely powerful and plays dang well near everything you chuck at it,

  • PostfixAdmin 3.0.2

    This release fixes a security bug - admins could delete protected aliases like abuse@ (CVE-2017-5930). Besides that, some non-security bugs were fixed. Read the official announcement for details.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.700.0.0

    Time for another update of RcppArmadillo with a new release 0.7.700.0.0 based on a fresh Armadillo 7.700.0. Following my full reverse-dependency check of 318 package (commit of log here), CRAN took another day to check again.

  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 16.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 16.1.0 for both macOS and Linux.

    The big news in CrossOver 16.1 is that we now support Quicken 2017. We know many of our customers use Quicken and CrossOver to do their taxes this time of year. With CrossOver 16.1, you can use the latest version of Quicken.

Tizen Apps

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OS
Linux
Software
  • Smartphone App: Walkie Talkie app added to Tizen Store

    Last week, we have had a new Walkie Talkie app added to the Tizen Store, something a little different and a little fun, created by developer SomyaC. A walkie-talkie (more formally known as a Handheld Transceiver, or HT) is a hand- held, portable, two-way radio transceiver that lets you communicate directly between both handsets.

  • Smartphone App: Speed Test for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 is available in Tizen Store

    Do you know what is your internet speed on your Tizen smartphone? Do you know your internet connection download or upload speed? Anything about ping? Have you never test it? No problem! Developer Srabani S S Patra added a new app last week named Speed Test.

Wine Staging Release 2.1

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Software
  • Release 2.1

    The main change of this release is the reworked CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) patchset. As many Wine Staging users will already know, the idea of CSMT is to move the execution of OpenGL commands to a separate thread, and to use available CPU and GPU resources more efficiently. In the new version the existing code has been cleaned up and various hacks have been removed. The result of this work is that all D3D related tests pass again. We also tested some D3D11 games which were previously broken with CSMT enabled and they started working. If you encountered bugs when using the CSMT, it might be a good time to retest them with the new release.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 Reworks CSMT For D3D10/D3D11

    Riding off last week's Wine 2.1 release as the first post-2.0 bi-weekly development snapshot, Wine-Staging 2.1 has been released that continues to incorporate all of its various experimental/testing patches.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 release with CSMT support for DirectX 10 & 11

    Wine-Staging has a big new update which brings in their CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) support for DirectX 10 & 11. See their news here for the full details.

    CSMT should enable games run in Wine to run better and closer to the level found in Windows directly. They do note, that right now their focus was on getting it working and it doesn't have some of the performance changes from the earlier version of CSMT.

KDE and New Software

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KDE
Software
  • Finally, a Linux laptop worthy of KDE

    These are Macbook Air-like machines that are (as the name would imply) slim, light, and modern. The weight of Slimbook with an installed 120GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM, comes in at 1.39 kg (3.06 pounds). Considering my Chromebook Pixel 2 weighs in at 3.4 pounds, I would happily accept that encumbrance.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 – Here is the First Bugfix Release

    Today, the Kde team announced the first minor release for Kde Plasma 5.9 including various little but important bugfixes and translation updates. Certainly, this first small bugfix release will improve the stability and usability of the desktop environment.

  • Desktop Dimmer – an Open-Source Screen Dimmer App

    If you regularly work in a dark room, and find your dimmed screen is still too bright, you may want to this open-source screen dimmer app a try.

  • Kupfer Quick Launcher Ported To Python 3 And GTK 3, Sees New Release After 4 And A Half Years [PPA]

    After around 4 and a half years of inactivity, a new Kupfer (quick launcher) version was released 3 days ago, followed by 3 more releases since then.

    The application has a new developer who ported the application to Python 3, GTK 3 and GObject Introspection, while also fixing various bugs.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Awesome vim plugins for writers

    Vim is one of the most popular text editors among programmers, web developers, and power users of GNU/Linux. This is not surprising, because Vim offers high-speed editing, has extensibility, and is pre-installed on most Linux-based distributions.

    In addition, Vim offers great benefits to writers, regardless of whether they are technically minded or not. I personally use it not only for editing configuration files and web pages, but for writing blogs, software documentation, notes, and presentation slides. In my opinion, the only potential issue it has might be its relatively steep learning curve. I remember that it took me about two weeks to become comfortable working in it, but since then, editing any kind of text has felt noticeably more fluent compared to other editors I used before.

  • FFmpeg 3.2.3 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Released with 35 Fixes

    The major FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" open-source multimedia framework recently received its third maintenance release, versioned 3.2.3, which brings up-to-date components and a bunch of various improvements.

    FFmpeg 3.2.3 was released on February 6, 2017, and comes exactly two months after the previous point release, namely FFmpeg 3.2.2, announced on December 5, 2016. It is now considered the latest stable FFmpeg release from the 3.2 "Hypatia" series, which was officially unveiled on October 26, 2016.

  • Video: LCA 2017 - Package Managers All the Way Down

    Anyone who has been using Linux for a while is familiar with package managers and package management. Being a Fedora user, I have noticed a few projects that Fedora has in the works to augment package management. For example, Fedora Atomic does not the traditional package manager (dnf) but uses rpm-ostree instead. Why would Fedora be working on additional packaging systems? What is wrong with existing package managers? I have been asking myself those questions for some time now.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Web Browser Is Out with Built-In Screenshot Tool, New History Panel

    Today, February 8, 2017, Vivaldi Technologies have had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the Vivaldi 1.7 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    Vivaldi 1.7 comes two months after the release of version 1.6, which launched on December 15, 2016, as the world's first web browser to display notifications in tabs for web pages that offer content in real time, such as Facebook and Twitter, and promises to introduce various new features that we bet many of you will love. First off, you should know that Vivaldi 1.7 is based on the open-source Chromium 56.0.2924.88 browser.

Leftovers: Software and HowTos

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Software
HowTos

CrossOver 16.1.0 and DiRT Rally

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Software
Gaming

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • View 360 Panorama Photos on Ubuntu with this Image Viewer Plugin
  • AV1 Is Making Progress As A Royalty-Free Video Codec Based Off VP9

    The Alliance for Open Media continues working hard on their first video codec, dubbed AV1, that started off with the VP9 libvpx code-base and are pursuing to do for free video codecs what the Opus codec has done for audio.

    AV1 strives to be a viable open, royalty-free video codec suitable for Internet video and developed by Alliance for Open Media. AV1 is still hoping to succeed VP9 and be a viable contender to HEVC/H.265, but not until later in 2017 is the bitstream format expected to be finalized and thus not until 2018 when we may begin seeing some AV1 adoption.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Browser Gets a Release Candidate, Now Based on Chromium 56.0.2924.88

    Softpedia was informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.7 web browser, dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36.

    By our count, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36 is the eighth released for the Vivaldi 1.7 development cycle. This is small release that rebases the web browser to Chromium 56.0.2924.88, updates various language translations, fixes a handful of regressions from previous versions, and improves the new History panel.

  • Will Skype’s Linux App Stop Working on March 1?
  • You Can Now Install Various KDE Apps from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Snappy Store

    In December last year, we reported on the work done by KDE Community developer Harald Sitter to bundle the official KDE applications as Snaps and make them available for installation on the Ubuntu Snappy Store.

    A Snap build of the latest KDE Frameworks 5, a collection of add-on libraries for Qt 5, made its way into the Snappy Store, and can be easily installed on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system if you execute the "sudo snap install kde-frameworks-5" command in a terminal emulator.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 Upgrade Brings Open-Source Office Suite to the Cloud

    The open-source LibreOffice office application suite has been improving steadily since 2010, when it was forked from the Oracle OpenOffice suite. The latest incremental milestone is LibreOffice version 5.3, released Feb. 1 and providing users with new features and improved performance. LibreOffice bundles multiple applications including the Writer Document, Calc Spreadsheet, Impress Presentation, Draw, Math Formula and Base Database. Among the numerous feature updates in Writer are new PDF document-handling capabilities that enable users to import and digitally sign existing documents. Writer also benefits from new table formatting capabilities and an easier-to-use side menu for page options. LibreOffice typically is available as the default office suite in many Linux distributions and freely available for Apple Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows applications. Plus, with LibreOffice 5.3, the whole office suite also can be deployed in the cloud. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at key features of LibreOffice 5.3.

  • Glibc 2.25 Now Available With getrandom(), Better Stack Smashing Protection

    New features to glibc 2.25 include getentropy() and getrandom() functions, several other new functions, new math.h features, support for OpenBSD's explicit_bzero, most of glibc can now built with the stack smashing protector enabled, expanded coverage of GDB pretty printers, some new tunables, and a range of other work.

  • [Old] vc-dwim-1.8 released [stable]
  • [Old] GNU Screen v.4.5.0
  • A Makefile for your Go project

    My most loathed feature of Go is the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. Hopefully, this issue is slowly starting to be accepted by the main authors. In the meantime, you can workaround this problem with more opinionated tools (like gb) or by crafting your own Makefile.

  • nanotime 0.1.1
  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.1
  • IPv6 and OpenVPN on Linode Debian/Ubuntu VPS
  • How To Install The Java Runtime And Development Kit On Ubuntu
  • How To Enable Subtitles On Kodi 17 Krypton With Estuary Skin
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