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Software

Going Headless

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Software
Ubuntu

theopensourcerer.com: I have one monitor on my desk, quite a nice one, but only one. Right now I want to install Ubuntu Lucid on another desktop I have in the office, but I still want to use my monitor for other stuff (like writing this blog post). No problem, Ubuntu has an accessible installer, I just plug in the speakers and keyboard and go through it with audio, lets see how it goes.

Kiosk in KDE 4

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Software

dev-peterix.blogspot: The original KioskTool for KDE 3 is probably rather well-known compared to the newer KDE 4 port that currently resides in extragear. While the older version is much more complete, even in the first few minutes of use, I encountered segfaults.

Nero brings blue ray disc support to Linux

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Hardware
Software

linusearch.com: Nero Linux 4 brings support for all optical disk including, Blue Ray disc support. The company that produces Nero Linux 4 claims that this is the only product to support blue data laser burning in Linux.

Most Beautiful GNOME Shell Themes Ever!

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Software

techdrivein.com: We saw the quiet evolution of GNOME Shell aka the next generation GNOME desktop environment. Now lets do some GNOME Shell theming.

Tales From the Front: in Search of APT-GET UNDO

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Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I am currently in that level of hell reserved for people who upgrade their GNU/Linux system too quickly.

XBMC Camelot - Beautiful, stylish, classy, and fun

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Software

dedoimedo.com: Would you like to transform your television into a powerful media center with Internet connectivity, network sharing, video and music playlists, photo albums, weather forecast, maybe even games? Enter XBMC.

3 Great Linux Radio Apps To Discover Great New Music

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Software

makeuseof.com: Massive MP3 collections are nice, but they don’t do everything. Sometimes you want to discover new music, for example, or listen to the news. Traditionally this was the role of the radio, but if you’re a geek (and if you’re reading this blog I’m betting you are) you’re far more likely to be around computers than FM receivers.

How Much Faster Is Konqueror With WebKit?

Filed under
KDE
Software

digitizor.com: Yesterday we wrote about how you can make WebKit default in Konqueror. We always knew that WebKit is going to make Konqueror faster; but how much faster? Today we test.

Comparing Three Linux RSS Feed Readers

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Software

maketecheasier.com: Here at MTE we’ve already covered some useful desktop feed readers for Windows and Mac, so now seems like a good time to check out what Linux has to offer.

Could this be Muinshee 2.0?

Filed under
Software

omgsuse.com: Muinshee is a basic interface for playing and queueing songs similar to the Muine music player that long-time GNOME users may remember.

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Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love