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Software

Web Browser Grand Prix 2: The Top 5 Tested And Ranked

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Software

tomshardware.com: Since the time our first Web Browser Grand Prix debuted, the already-raging browser wars have become heated indeed. In case you haven't been keeping tabs on the browser news, let's begin by getting up to speed on the latest:

Virtualization Software for Linux

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junauza.com: In computing, virtualization has been described in a variety of ways. But to simplify its meaning or to make it more casual I should say; virtualization is creating a virtual (not actual) form of a stuff to make it into something that is functional and efficient.

SMPlayer and GNOME Mplayer - Mplayer Based players

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echdrivein.com: If you like mplayer, you will love SMPlayer and Gnome-Mplayer. Both SMplayer and Gnome-Mplayer are really good MPlayer front-ends and they do work great. SMplayer has long been my favorite multimedia player in Ubuntu and we have even featured SMplayer among the most wanted multimedia apps for Ubuntu.

Midori 0.2.6: Simple, lightweight, but still needs work

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Software

linuxcritic.wordpress: In my ongoing search for something with which to tinker, I’ve occasionally run across the Midori browser, a fully GTK+2 integrated, WebKit-based browser with a focus on being lightweight and simple.

Spotify for Linux arrives

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Software

techradar.com: Spotify for Linux has arrived, with a preview version of the popular music service arriving on the open source platform.

Ubuntu 10.10 Alpha 2 Software Center VS Linux Mint 9 Software Manager

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linuxnov.com: With the new release Ubuntu 10.10 Alpha 2 the new software center comes with a new shape, as well the new release of software manager of Linux Mint 9 Isadora.

The Five Orders of Technology OR Why OpenOffice Impress Sucks

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Software
OOo

hartmansblog.blogspot: don't have decades of experience supporting technology, but in the few years I've been at the academies I've noticed that several mistakes I've made were as a result of my failure to properly understand what I've come to refer to as the "Five Orders of Technology".

Smitten with Xfce 4

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blogs.techrepublic.com: The first desktop I decided to cover was, oddly enough, Xfce. The first thing to do? Get to know Xfce. I did..and I was really impressed.

5 things you didn't know about Java performance monitoring

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Java performance profiling with JConsole and VisualVM

Is This the End of the Line for Python 2.x?

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developer.com: The Python programming language has been in a rather long transition. Version 3.x came out 18 months ago, but 2.x has carried on as developers support legacy apps and code. But now that developers have had 18 months to get ready, Developer.com wonders, will Python 2.7 be the end of the 2.x line?

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BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS