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Krita 3.0.1 is Out

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  • Krita 3.0.1: new features and bug fixes

    Krita 3.0.1 is the first release after Krita 3.0. With the new release schedule we’re trying to release every six weeks, with a combination of new features and bug fixes. This release already contains the first results of the 2016 Google Summer of Code projects, as well as kickstarter-funded features, the work of new contributors Eugene Ingerman, Nishant Rodrigues, Miroslav Talasek and Laurent Jospin and the work from students mentored by Dmitry: Grigory Tantsev and Alexey Kapustin.

  • Krita 3.0.1 Digital Painting App Arrives with New Threshold Filter, Many Changes

    Today, September 6, 2016, a new version of the Krita open-source digital painting software has been released, build 3.0.1, and it's the first bugfix and feature release for the major Krita 3.0 series.

    Release highlights of Krita 3.0.1 include the ability to tweak the Brush settings in the pop-up palette, soft proofing support, which lets you see how your artwork will look like when its converted to CMYK (Cyan-Magenta-Yellow-Black), as well as various improvements to the mirror tools by adding extra options.

Leftovers: Software

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Leftovers: Software

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  • GNU nano 2.7.0 was released

    The first nano where you can select text by holding Shift together with the movement keys. (This doesn't work on all terminal emulators, but works fine on a Linux consolse, on an xterm, and on a Gnome Terminal.

  • 20 Years of KDE Timeline

    KDE is celebrating 20 years as the original and best free software end-user creating community. The milestones of our project are marked on our 20 Years of KDE timeline. Find out the meetings and releases which defined KDE. Learn about the early and recent KDE gatherings around the world and how we have evolved over the years. What was your first KDE release?

  • Akademy 2016 BoF Wrapup Video

    The first BoF day of Akademy is over with several teams meeting to discuss their progress and plans for the next year. At the end of the day we had a group session to summarise what went on in each of the rooms. Watch the video of the wrapup to discover the plans for the next year.

  • Restricted Funds in Non-Profit Accounting

    I’ve served as treasurer for three separate organizations over the last six years. Two of them are US 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations. The other is a consumer-owned cooperative. I’m not an accountant, but I’ve learned a lot about accounting, and each organization has forced me to learn something new.

    Today’s adventure is learning how to deal with restricted funds, or funds that have to be used for a particular purpose. I’m going to show four different techniques for dealing with restricted funds, along with some pros and cons.

  • Frugalware 2.1 "Derowd" Linux Distro Arrives with GNOME 3.20.2, Kernel 4.7.2

    Believe it or not, the Frugalware Linux distribution is still around, and while it was never all that popular among newcomers, some of us hardcore geeks still want to enjoy a well-done operating system on our personal computers.

The Flash Trap

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Leftovers: Software

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  • Adobe Returns To Updating NPAPI/Linux Flash Player

    Adobe stopped updating its NPAPI-based Linux Flash Player four years ago and planned to stop supporting it entirely in 2017, but now the company has backtracked on those steps with a commitment to regularly update their NPAPI and PPAPI versions of the Flash Player for Linux.

  • Wine 1.9.18 Improves Support for No Man's Sky, Fallout 4 & Microsoft Office 2010
  • Qt 5.8 Alpha released

    I’m happy to let you know that we have now reached our first milestone towards the release of Qt 5.8. The Alpha version of Qt 5.8 is now ready, and can be downloaded from or your Qt Account. As a new minor release, Qt 5.8 comes with a lot of new features as well as many bug fixes and improvements. We’ll go through all the new features in more detail as we get closer to the release. For now, let me just mention some of the biggest changes.

  • Qt 5.8 Alpha Released With New Graphics Architecture, Qt Lite

    Last week's Qt 5.8 Alpha preliminary packages have now been promoted to being the official alpha packages for this next major version of the Qt5 tool-kit.

  • Retweet 0.9: Automatically retweet & like

    Retweet 0.9, a self-hosted Python app to automatically retweet and like tweets from another user-defined Twitter account, was released this September, 2nd.

  • Rcpp 0.12.7: More updates

    The seventh update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp just arrived on the CRAN network for GNU R as well as in Debian. This 0.12.7 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, and the 0.12.6 release in July --- making it the eleventh release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Keeping with the established pattern, this is again more of a maintenance release which addresses small bugs, nuisances or documentation issues without adding any major new features. One issue that got to a few people was our casual use of NORET in the definition of Rcpp::stop(). We had (ahem) overlooked that NORET is only defined by R 3.2.0 or later, and several folks trying to build on older releases of R (why?) got bitten. Well, at least we have a new record for most frequently reported bug ... Kidding aside, this is now fixed.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Calibre 2.66 eBook Converter and Viewer Adds Support for PocketBook Touch HD

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal announced the release of version 2.66 of his popular, cross-platform, free, and open-source Calibre ebook library management software.

    Calibre 2.66 comes just one week after the release of the previous maintenance update, Calibre 2.65.1, and promises to update the application's logo to a more simplified version, upgrade the driver for Kobo e-book readers to firmware 3.20, and add support for the fairly new PocketBook Touch HD reader.

  • Google Earth Update Fixes Several Linux Bugs, Adds New Icon

    The latest bug fix update to Google Earth desktop app finally allows Linux users to see Panoramio photos without pesky workarounds, and adds a new app icon.

  • What’s coming in Tracker 1.10

    Tracker 1.9.1 was released last month, and it comes with some work we did to improve the various extract modules (the code which looks at files on disk and extracts what we think is useful information). The extract modules are no longer hardcoded to generate SPARQL commands, instead they now use the new TrackerResource API which is a simple way of describing resources programmatically.

  • 2016 GNOME Summit @ Montréal

    Hi everyone, we’re planning to host the GNOME Summit in Montréal this year, on October 8-9-10 (US Colombus Day week-end, Canadian Thanksgiving). It is an unconference-style event aimed for those who want to get involved at the deeply technical level of GNOME, but everyone is welcome and we’re hoping to have a newcomers-oriented session as well as the “deep end of the pool”. Please pre-register here by Friday, indicate any topics of interest you would like to propose for collective tackling during the summit, and indicate your travel and accommodation needs. I will try to secure the venue and figure out all the details surrounding the event soon. Oh, and if you’re in any position to ask one of the GNOME-friendly companies for sponsorship, please do so and drop me an email at nekohayo at gmail. Thanks!

Leftovers: Software

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  • Seafile server 6.0.2 stable is released

    This new design makes Seafile look more like a web app. Making use of technologies like backbone.js and Bootstrap, the UI is now more responsive and easier to use than ever.

    The new UI is also adaptive to screen sizes. If you have a wide screen, the new UI can take the advantage to show more content in one line. If you have a small screen, the new UI can also adapt to it.

  • Why Linux Users Will Love FastMail

    I’m not sure if FastMail’s documentation got better or if I was just in a better headspace this time, but getting it configured was pretty easy. I have a lot of old email addresses from old web projects but setting up the domain records was simple, with detailed steps from FastMail. I had one issue that the help desk resolved fairly quickly (FastMail has great email support).

  • OpenShot 2.1 Released!
  • Arcan “Monthly”, September Edition

    For this round, there’s a new tagged Arcan (i.e. the Display Server) version (0.5.1) and a new tagged Durden (i.e. the example “Desktop Environment”) version (0.2). Although some new features can’t be recorded with the setup I have here, the following demo video covers some of the major changes:

  • QEMU 2.7.0 is now available
  • nano to remain in GNU
  • Cutelyst 0.13.0 released!

    When I started Cutelyst a simple developer Engine (read HTTP engine) was created, it was very slow and mostly an ugly hackery but helped work on the APIs that matter, I then took a look at uWSGI due some friend saying it was awesome and it was great to be able to deal with many protocols without the hassled of writing parsers for them.

    Fast forwarding to 0.12.0 release and I started to feel that I was reaching a limit on Cutelyst optimizations and uWSGI was holding us back, and it wasn’t only about performance, memory usage (scalability) was too high for something that should be rather small, it’s written in C after all.

  • Yokadi 1.1.0 is out
  • VirtualBox & unknown version of X Window system

    Here's my story. As it happens, I was testing Fedora 23 in VirtualBox one day, and as a very first step to enjoying myself, I decided to install the Guest Additions. However, after a few brief, tense moments, VirtualBox told me that it had detected an unknown version of the X Window System installed and was not installing X Window System drivers.

    A quick search on the VirtualBox ticketary lists this as a five-month old bug for VirtualBox 4.3, even though I was running 5.0.6, and it mentions upgrading to a newer version of the virtualization software as a fix, which I could not do at this point. So what now?

  • Multitrack audio in Nageru 1.4.0

    Even though the Chess Olympiad takes some attention right now, development on Nageru (my live video mixer) has continued steadily throughout since the 1.3.0 release. I wanted to take a little time to talk about the upcoming 1.4.0 release, and why things are as they are; writing down things often make them a bit clearer.

    Every major release of Nageru has had a specific primary focus: 1.0.0 was about just getting everything to work, 1.1.0 was about NVIDIA support for more oomph, 1.2.0 was about stabilization and polish (and added support for Blackmagic's PCI cards as a nice little bonus), and 1.3.0 was about x264 integration. For 1.4.0, I wanted to work on multitrack audio and mixing.

  • Kaku Is An Open-Source Desktop YouTube Music Player for Linux

    Kaku is a YouTube desktop music player for Windows, Mac and Linux. It is open-source, free to download, and offers some nifty features, including an online DJ.

  • Krita Appimage for cats
  • [Kdenlive] Manage Cached Data
  • Multi-process Firefox brings 400-700% improvement in responsiveness

    Earlier this summer I wrote about Mozilla’s efforts to rollout a multi-process architecture, codename Electrolysis, for Firefox. In the months since, Mozilla has completed its initial tests on 1 percent of its user population and the initial numbers are good, according to Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox at Mozilla.

    The company is reporting a 400 percent improvement in responsiveness and a 700 percent improvement in responsiveness for loading large web pages.These numbers mean that users are far less likely to see their browser freeze, pause, lag or crash. Dotzler himself used the word “janky” to describe previous versions of the browser.

    Over the next week, multi-process will be coming to 10 percent of total Firefox users. For now, users with add-ons will not be getting the new architecture. The staggered rollout is fairly industry standard to avoid shipping bugs. Having two independent groups of users allows Mozilla to benchmark metrics from the new version against unconverted users.

    For now, multi-process is limited to a single content process and a single browser process. Later versions will include multiple content processes and sandboxing.

  • Microsoft Finally Releases Skype 1.6 for Linux [Ed: surveillance software]

    It’s been a while since Microsoft rolled out the latest update for Skype for Linux, so today the software giant finally pushed the green button for version 1.6 which brings several improvements and a few new features.

Announcing the KDE Software Store

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Big news: Today, KDE announced a new software store, and that the source code for this new service has been released as Free software under the AGPL, fixing a long standing bug in KDE software: reliance on a proprietary web service.

That also means that KDE has a new software store that replaces the opendesktop sites. The migration has been happening in the background, so you may actually have used the new store from within Plasma or applications to install add-ons already without noticing it!

Read more

Also: KDE Software Store

KDE Software Store Announced, AGPL Licensed

Leftovers: Software

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  • apt 1.3 RC4 – Tweaking apt update

    Did that ever happen to you: You run apt update, it fetches a Release file, then starts fetching DEP-11 metadata, then any pdiff index stuff, and then applies them; all after another? Or this: You don’t see any update progress until very near the end? Worry no more: I tweaked things a bit in 1.3~rc4 (git commit).

  • QEMU 2.7 Released With Many Improvements For The Linux Virtualization Stack

    It's time for another stable QEMU update.

    QEMU 2.7 is today's new feature release and has numerous ARM/MIPS improvements, CPU hot-remove support for x86, VirtIO-BLK now supports multi-queue, a new e1000e network device, support for Xen para-virtualized USB, VirtIO GPU improvements, speed improvements for the TCG code generator, and various other enhancements.

  • Git v2.10.0

    The latest feature release Git v2.10.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 639 non-merge commits since v2.9.0, contributed by 76 people, 22 of which are new faces.

  • Git 2.10 Released

    Git 2.10 isn't the most exciting feature release, but there is some new functionality. Git 2.10 features various minor updates to the many sub-commands, performance improvements to Git's fast-import, HTTP transfer improvements, various other improvements and a wide assortment of fixes.

  • Batch file renaming and integrated archive support added to Nautilus

    The Files application (aka Nautilus) is getting a major update in Fedora 25 Workstation. Fedora 25 is slated to include Nautilus 3.22, adding a new GUI interface for batch renaming of files, and will also add integrated archive support. GNOME Developer Carlos Soriano has blogged in depth about all the new features in Nautilus 3.22, including some additional features that might be included in the future. OMG! Ubuntu! also has a great writeup if you want to learn more about the new features.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • i2pd 2.10 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses. I2P client is a software used for building and using anonymous I2P networks. Such networks are commonly used for anonymous peer-to-peer applications (filesharing, cryptocurrencies) and anonymous client-server applications (websites, instant messengers, chat-servers). I2P allows people from all around the world to communicate and share information without restrictions.
  • Pixeluvo Review | Photo Editor for Linux & Windows
    A review of Pixeluvo, a great photo editor available on Linux and Windows. Pixeluvo is not free or open source.
  • Blit, A Retrospective On My Largest Project Ever
    I’ve always been someone who’s liked art and programming. Especially combining the two. One of my favorite genres is pixel art, or sprites as they are also known. I’ve dabbled in making a few other art programs before, but nothing like this. Originally Blit supposed to be only a sprite animation tool that had a modern look and feel, but my ideas for it grew greater (*sigh* feature creep). There are many other sprinting tools out there like GrafX2, Aseprite, (and other 2D animation programs like TVPaint). I’m not saying that it’s wrong that they make their own GUI toolkit, but it feels kind of odd. I really wanted to bring these types of programs out of the days of the Amiga. After doing some initial research, I settled on using Qt.
  • An alert on the upcoming 7.51.0 release
    In two weeks time, on Wednesday November 2nd, we will release curl and libcurl 7.51.0 unless something earth shattering happens.
  • Desktop Gmail Client `WMail` 2.0.0 Stable Released
    WMail is a free, open source desktop client for Gmail and Google Inbox, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
  • SpaceView: Ubuntu File System Usage Indicator
  • FunYahoo++: New Yahoo Messenger Plugin For Pidgin / libpurple [PPA]
    Yahoo retired its old Messenger protocol in favor of a new one, breaking compatibility with third-party applications, such as Pidgin, Empathy, and so on. Eion Robb, the SkypeWeb and Hangouts developer, has created a replacement Yahoo prpl plugin, called FunYahoo++, that works with the new Yahoo Messenger protocol. Note that I tested the plugin with Pidgin, but it should work with other instant messaging applications that support libpurple, like BitlBee or Empathy.
  • GCC Lands Loop Splitting Optimization
    The latest GCC 7 development code has an optimization pass now for loop splitting.
  • GCC 7 To End Feature Development Next Month
    Friday's GCC 7 status report indicates the feature freeze is coming up in just a few weeks. Red Hat developer Jakub Jelinek wrote in the latest status report, "Trunk which will eventually become GCC 7 is still in Stage 1 but its end is near and we are planning to transition into Stage 3 starting Nov 13th end of day time zone of your choice. This means it is time to get things you want to have in GCC 7 finalized and reviewed. As usual there may be exceptions to late reviewed features but don't count on that. Likewise target specific features can sneak in during Stage 3 if maintainers ok them."
  • GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') released [stable]
    GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.
  • GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset released
    GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset has been released !
  • guile-ncurses 2.0 released
    I am pleased to announce the release of guile-ncurses 2.0 guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is a wrapper to the ncurses TUI library. It contains some basic text display and keyboard and mouse input functionality, as well as a menu widget and a form widget. It also has lower level terminfo and termios functionality.
  • Unifont 9.0.03 Released
    Unifont 9.0.03 is released. The main changes are the addition of the Pikto and Tonal ConScript Unicode Registry scripts.
  • PATHspider 1.0.0 released!
    In today’s Internet we see an increasing deployment of middleboxes. While middleboxes provide in-network functionality that is necessary to keep networks manageable and economically viable, any packet mangling — whether essential for the needed functionality or accidental as an unwanted side effect — makes it more and more difficult to deploy new protocols or extensions of existing protocols. For the evolution of the protocol stack, it is important to know which network impairments exist and potentially need to be worked around. While classical network measurement tools are often focused on absolute performance values, PATHspider performs A/B testing between two different protocols or different protocol extensions to perform controlled experiments of protocol-dependent connectivity problems as well as differential treatment.
  • The Domain Name System

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • Happy 20th birthday, KDE!
    KDE turned twenty recently, which seems significant in a world that seems to change so fast. Yet somehow we stay relevant, and excited to continue to build a better future. Lydia asked recently on the KDE-Community list what we were most proud of.
  • SETI – Week of Information Technology
  • KDevelop for Windows available on Chocolatey now
    Which is already great in itself! But now it's also possible to install it via the super popular Windows package manager for Windows, Chocolatey.
  • colord-kde 0.5.0 released!
    Last official stable release was done more than 3 years ago, it was based on Qt/KDE 4 tech, after that a few fixes got in what would be 0.4.0 but as I needed to change my priorities it was never released. Thanks to Lukáš Tinkl it was ported to KF5, on his port he increased the version number to 0.5.0, still without a proper release distros rely on a git checkout.
  • Call for attendees Lakademy 2017
    As many of you know, since 2012 we organize the Lakademy, a sort of Latin American Akademy. The event brings together KDE Latin American contributors in hacking sessions to work on their projects, promo meetings to think KDE dissemination strategies in the region and other activities.
  • Plasma 5 Desktop on FreeBSD Branding
    The FreeBSD packages of KDE software — the KDE 4 desktop, and soon KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications — have traditionally been shipped pretty much as delivered from the upstream source. We compile, we package, and there is very little customization we do as a “distro”. The KDE 4 packages came with a default wallpaper that was a smidgen different from the one shipped with several Linux distro’s. I think Ivan Cukic did that artwork originally. For Plasma 5 Desktop, we also wanted to do a tiny bit of branding — just the default wallpaper for new users, mind.
  • A bit on Tooling
    So on the weekend I also worked on updating Qt 5.6.1 to Qt 5.6.2 on FreeBSD, which involves using new and scary tools as well. Power tools, they can be really useful, or they can take off a finger if you’re not careful. In this case it was Phabricator, which is also used in KDE — but not everywhere in KDE. For FreeBSD, the tool is used to review updates to ports (the packaging instructions), so I did an update of Qt from 5.6.1 to 5.6.2 and we handled the review through FreeBSD’s Phab. The ports infrastructure is stored in SVN, so the review is relatively straightforward: update the ports-tree checkout, apply your changes, use arc to create or update a review request. I was amazed by how painless it was — somehow I’d been frightened. Using the tool once, properly, makes a big difference in self-confidence.
  • Krita 3.1 second beta.
    The Krita 3.1 beta come with a full features and fixes. The linux version to download your krita-3.0.91-x86_64.appimage.
  • Second Beta for Krita 3.1 Available
    We’re still fixing bugs like madmen… And working on some cool new features as well, but that’s for a later release. In any case, here is the second Krita 3.1 beta! Yes, you’re reading that correctly. Originally, we had planned to use 3.0.2 as the version for this release, but there is so much news in it that it merits a bigger version bump.


  • Consequences of the HACK CAMP 2016 FEDORA + GNOME
    I used to do install parties in order to promote the use of FEDORA and GNOME project since five years ago. As you can see more details in the Release Party FEDORA 17 for Fedora, and Linux Camp 2012, GNOME PERU 2013, GNOME PERU 2014...
  • GNOME Shell Making It Easy To Launch Apps/Games For Optimus / Dual GPU Systems
    With the GNOME 3.24 desktop that's currently in development the latest GNOME Shell code has support for easily letting the user launch an app on a dedicated GPU when applicable for handling NVIDIA Optimus use-cases of having integrated and discrete GPU laptops. When a dual-GPU system is detected, a menu item will be added to opt for "Launch using Dedicated Graphics Card", per this commit. The GNOME Shell change for supporting discrete GPUs was made and when the user opts to launch on the dedicated GPU, the DRI_PRIME=1 environment variable will automatically be set for that new program/game.