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Three Little Utilities That Make a Big Difference

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Software

linuxloop.com: One of the things that I love about being a Linux user is that there are tons of incredibly useful little tools. These are three of the “killer apps” I use.

Minimal word processors

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Software

blogs.gentoo: I've just discovered two very interesting minimal word processors. They're designed by writers, for writers.

Mesa 7.5 Gets New OpenGL Extensions & More

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phoronix.com: Mesa 7.3 was only released a few days back and then the branch for the stabilized Mesa 7.4 created, but new work for Mesa 7.5 has already hit Mesa's Git master branch.

KWin the Conqueror

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HowTos

kdedevelopers.org: Using KWin without the KDE desktop is perfectly possible. KWin is actually a KDE application like any other (well, more or less) and so just like other KDE applications it can run in GNOME, Xfce or even standalone, as long as the KDE libraries are available.

Songbird 1.0 Review - An Awesome Release!

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tuxarena.blogspot: Not long ago I reviewed Songbird 0.7.0, and in the meantime version 1.0.0 was released. What are the new features Songbird comes with and what improvements over the previous releases features 1.0?

Microsoft Deserves Some Credit for Reaching Out to Moonlight

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Microsoft
Software

linuxloop.com: Whatever you might want to say about Microsoft calling Silverlight “crossplatform” and not making a version for Linux, you have to give them credit for what they did leading up to Obama’s inauguraiton.

Linux pitfall of soft links ln - Rhythm Box - Music Player on Ubuntu

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watkissonline.co.uk: I came across a strange issue on one of my Ubuntu computers. I had added some more MP3 files to my music folder and so to my surprise I ended up with two of each file in my library on Rhythm Box.

Suse Studio: Linux customization for the masses

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news.cnet.com: One of the great promises of software is its infinite malleability: software can be whatever you want, so long as you have the skills necessary (and legal rights) to modify it. I'm therefore hugely impressed by Novell's Suse Studio, an innovative way to enable both standardization and customization of the Linux kernel.

Top 50 Linux Alternatives to Popular Apps

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laptoplogic.com: Linux is quickly gaining popularity, but there are still many users afraid to convert as they are not familiar with the applications. Today our Linux guru Blair Mathis is back to introduce fifty of the most popular applications on this OS.

Amarok2 and redefinition of awesomeness

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Software

gnufied.org: I used to be a KDE user and devoted Amarok user. Even when fancy took me to run Gnome, I used to run Amarok faithfully. Nothing unique, many Gnome users do the same. Amarok2 has been criticised and critics attacked fittingly.

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From the Editors: You’ve come a long way, Linux

This month, as we do every March, we reported on the Who Writes Linux report from the Linux Foundation. Usually, this is a fairly rote affair: Red Hat and Intel contribute tons of code, Greg Kroah-Hartman does a ton of the work, and we learn about some small firm somewhere that’s cranking out kernel code disproportionate to its size. Read more

SteamOS A Linux Distribution For Gaming


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SteamOS is a Debian Linux kernel-based operating system in development by Valve Corporation designed to be the primary operating system for the Steam Machine game consoles. It was initially released on December 13, 2013, alongside the start of end-user beta testing of Steam Machines.
 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

KDE Applications 14.12.3 Officially Released

KDE Applications 14.12 has been released by its makers, and it’s a regular maintenance update. It comes with a ton of bug fixes and will be soon available in various repositories. Read more

Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine

BPF continues marching forward as a universal, in-kernel virtual machine for the Linux kernel. The Berkeley Packet Filter was originally designed for network packet filtering but has since been extended as eBPF to support other non-network subsystems via the bpf syscall. Here's some more details on this in-kernel virtual machine. Alexei Starovoitov presented at last month's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in Santa Rosa about BPF as an in-kernel virtual machine. The slides have been published for those wishing to learn more about its state and capabilities. Read more