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Cedega vs Crossover Games - Hands on Review

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Software
Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Most people who use Linux for desktop use are well aware of the one of the largest issues facing the platform: Lack of commercial software. Which brings me to my topic at hand - Cedega & Codeweavers. What are Cedega and Codeweavers? Designed to help you get your Windows games working with ease on Linux.

Why things are the way they are w/ Compiz++

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Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Someone in the comments asked me to address the issue as to why we don’t yet have commonly requested functionality such as minimized window previews and input redirection. This post will address this and some of the solutions that we may have in the future.

AbiWord is a Free Word Processor

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Software

howtogeek.com: Sometimes you need a word processing application but not an entire office suite. Today we take a look at AbiWord which is a free word processor for all three major OS platforms.

The Road to Compiz++ Part One: Plugin-Plugins

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Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Compiz 0.9 is a complete re-thinking of Compiz 0.8. It’s like KDE4 was to KDE3. Totally new frameworks. Totally new buildsystem. Totally new API. It’s supposed to clear the ground from major architectural flaws that were in older versions of compiz to make development far easier and faster even for future version of compiz.

NVIDIA Developer Talks Openly About Linux Support

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Linux
Hardware
Software
Interviews

phoronix.com: In late August we started asking our readers for any questions they had for NVIDIA about Linux and this graphics company's support of open-source operating systems. Many thanks go out to Andy Ritger for taking the time to answer these questions as well as to NVIDIA's Technical Marketing Manager, Sean Kilbride, for supporting this Q&A.

Hulu desktop for Linux

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Software

ghacks.net: I’m sure by now everyone here knows about Hulu. If not, Hulu is a rather huge collection of television programs that can be viewed on line, for free, with few commercial interruptions. It’s brilliant.

10 years of Ximian

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Software

tirania.org/blog: Today is the ten year anniversary of the incorporation of Ximian, Inc. A company founded by Nat Friedman and myself whose goal was to advance the state of the Linux desktop.

The Future Of Docky

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Software
Interviews

omgubuntu.co.uk: Since the news of Do and Docky's mutual decision to split to better serve users of both apps, a lot of readers have been left confused, worried and annoyed. Docky Creator Jason Smith Tells Us Why Docky Is Going To Get Even More Awesome.

Tom's Definitive Linux Software Roundup: Communications Apps

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Software

tomshardware.com: In this segment, we will be focusing on communications applications. While these apps still rely on Internet access to function, their focus is to allow the user to communicate with other individuals using the Internet simply as a transit medium.

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More in Tux Machines

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers

The origin and evolution of FreeDOS

Over the years, developers have shared with me how they use FreeDOS to run embedded systems. My all-time favorite example is a developer who used FreeDOS to power a pinball machine. FreeDOS ran an application that controlled the board, tallied the score, and updated the back display. I don't know exactly how it was built, but one way such a system could work is to have every bumper register a "key" on a keyboard bus and the application simply read from that input. I thought it was cool. People sometimes forget about legacy software, but it pops up in unexpected places. I used to be campus CIO of a small university, and once a faculty member brought in some floppy disks with old research data on them. The data wasn't stored in plaintext files, rather as DOS application data. None of our modern systems would read the old data files, so we booted a spare PC with FreeDOS, downloaded a shareware DOS program that could read the application data, and exported the data to plaintext. Read more