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Software

KOffice 2.0.0 tagged for release

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KDE
Software

computerworld.com.au: After nearly two years in the making, the KOffice project will release version 2.0.0 of if its cross-platform office suite of the same name this week, adding features like scripting support and a new shape library.

Gnome Elections: meet the candidates

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Software

stefanoforenza.com: Gnome Foundation elections are getting near, and the candidacies have already been submitted to the mailing list. Here’s an overview of the candidates, along with the copy paste of their candidacy mail.

Flock 2.5 Delivers the Promise of Social Media on the Web

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Software

linux-mag.com: As you spend more-and-more of your time on the Internet and connecting with others, Flock can help to streamline repetitive social activities.

Getting to know Gnote

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Software

scottnesbitt.net: As someone who writes for a living, I tend to take a lot of notes. For a while, used an application called Tomboy for that purpose. It was a nifty little app, but it ran a bit slowly for my tastes. I heard about Gnote, which is a rewrite of Tomboy in C++. Of course, I decided to give it a try.

Online Storage Options Compared

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Software
Web

lunduke.com: Having a local folder that is automatically synced to secure online storage is awesome. Drop a document in a folder. Boom. It’s backed up to a remote server. Which ones offer the best bang for my buck?

Qt vs. GTK: Kopete, KMess, Pidgin and Emesene

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Software

celettu.wordpress: I’ve mentioned a couple of times that, at least in my opinion, KDE is losing out to GNOME because there simply aren’t as many Qt applications as GTK ones. Competition breeds quality, and as a result, I find Qt applications in general to be inferior.

Gnome desktop overhaul guide

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Software

thesiliconjungle.wordpress: Gnome is pretty cool. It’s simple and solid. Unfortunately a default Gnome desktop is not very appealing to the eyes. We all come to the point where we wonder, “Can I make my Gnome desktop look super l33t?”

A Glass of WINE

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Software

jdeeth.blogspot: The biggest problem most people have with making The Big Move from Windows to Linux, indeed the problem I had, is the One Critical App. But my open source ideology and stubbornness got the better of me, and despite my sobriety I got some WINE.

Top 5 Applications I Can’t Live Without

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Software

everyjoe.com: Since I started using Linux, I’ve found a new set of tools that help me in my work everyday. If not directly used for work, at least these tools help me work faster in one way or another.

Chromium Hits Alpha Release

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Software

softsaurus.org: The Open Source project behind the Google Chrome browser called Chromium has finally established an official Alpha release and it promises to be a very lightweight swiss army knife once completed.

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Internet of Things Web Editor Open Source Project Started

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GNOME Software 3.22 Will Support Installation of Snaps, Flatpak Repository Files

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

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    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.