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Software

Software and howtos

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Software
HowTos
  • Calibre 3.6 E-Book Manager For Linux | Improved Copying and Moving from Libraries

    Calibre is Free and Open-Source advanced E-Book Manager for Linux, MAC OS X, and Microsoft WIndows. Everything you could think of when you consider E-Book manager, you can find it in Calibre. It supports importing/exporting e-books to E-Readers with a wired or wireless connections, converting e-books, supporting many file formats, download e-books from online stores, managing multiple libraries, edit e-books with an advanced editor, and more features.

  • The Man Command in GNU/Linux

    GNU/Linux is powerful. GNU/Linux is mighty. GNU/Linux can be confusing…

    One of the things that terrifies most people about GNU/Linux is the command line. Granted, most users can get away with never touching a terminal window nowadays on most modern distributions, but when a lot of people think of GNU/Linux they instantly picture a command line interface of scrolling text and gibberish code.

    Thankfully, learning to actually use the command line is not quite as daunting as one might assume, especially with the help of something known as the Man Pages.

  • USB Device Stacks, on RTFM, part 2
  • Enabling TRIM/DISCARD on Debian, ext4, luks, and lvm
  • Keeping Git Branches in Sync

Software: Green Recorder, Peek, mosh, Riot/Matrix, Vim, Cockpit and More

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Software
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux

    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
    It uses FFmpeg libraries and currently supported formats are: MKV, MP4, AVI, WMV, NUT and WebM (it only available for Wayland in Gnome session). You can choose the area to record, or use handy option ' Select a Window' to record a specific window, if you don't use any of these option and simply hit 'Record' button then it will record full-screen of the desktop. You can stop the recording process easily by right-clicking the icon and choosing 'Stop Record'. Or middle-clicking the recording icon in the notifications area (but doesn't work on all interfaces). Show Mouse and Follow Mouse are great options to have, you can adjust them as per your needs.

  • Peek – A Simple Animated Gif Screen Recorder for Linux

    Peek Gif Recorder is the perfect screen capture tool for short and sharp video clips.

    It was designed to use ffmpeg and imagemagick to take screencasts of your desktop and animate them to make them Gifs.

    It’s that nifty tool for those who might want to demo a bug or a brief gameplay session quickly.

  • [mosh-users] mosh 1.3.2 released

    mosh 1.3.2 has been released. This is primarily a maintenance release. (We skipped version 1.3.1 because of a glitch in Debian packaging. The previous release was mosh 1.3.0.)

  • The rise of Riot/Matrix messenger

    A lot announcements were made in summer 2017. Several p2p messengers were released, while the others continued to expand their user bases. Briar and Ring were announced at the same time, prepared for the usage. But what’s really surprised me was a Riot/Matrix messenger. It become indefinitely better for the past year, and its current state is close enough to the community needs. There is a short review of its functionality and incoming features.

  • Ring 1.0 is released

    On July 21, Savoir-faire Linux (SFL) announced the release of version 1.0 of its Ring communication tool. It is a cross-platform (Linux, Android, macOS, and Windows) program for secure text, audio, and video communication. Beyond that, though, it is part of the GNU project and is licensed under the GPLv3. Given the announcement, it seemed like a quick trial was in order. While it looks like it has great promise, Ring 1.0 falls a bit short of expectations.

    Privacy and security are two of the main attributes that Ring is striving for. To start with, Ring provides a peer-to-peer architecture that avoids a central server, which is done to maintain the privacy of the participants. The data is encrypted between the endpoints to thwart those in the middle who might want to listen in. Ring evolved from the SFLphone project, but moved away from SFLphone's centralized architecture, which is part of why the name has changed.

  • Why I Still Use Vim

    Vim is my default editor. There’s no particular reason for this, except that I ended up learning it when I moved over to Linux many years ago. I ended up liking it because I could edit my small source files on my quad-core machine without needing to wait forever for the file to open.

    Sure Vim isn’t a bad editor, it’s highly extensible, it’s easy to shell out to the, err well shell, its everywhere so when you ssh into some obscure server you can just type vim (or vi) and you’re good to go.

  • Changes to Docker container for Weblate

    First of all if you are still using nijel/weblate, you should switch to weblate/weblate. They both currently share same configuration, but it might happen that some future updates will go to the weblate owned container only.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 148

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 148.

  • Sailing towards Pitivi 1.0 (with some stops along the way)

    With the Ken-Burns effect project completed, most of my last two weeks were spent working on some existing tasks that should be solved for Pitivi 1.0, so we can get it out sooner.

  • Variety 0.6.4 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Variety is an open-source wallpaper changer designed for Linux operating system, it comes with great features and easy to use. There are many wallpaper manager applications available which offers many features but Variety has its own way to get things done. It can display wallpapers from local sources or lots of various online sources, allows user to change wallpaper on a regular interval, and provides easy ways to separate the great images from the junk.

  • exa a modern replacement for ls written in rust for Linux/Unix

    ls is a command to show files in Linux and Unix-like operating systems. A ls command first appeared in a version of AT&T UNIX as well as in Multics. BSD and GNU Coreutils package provides the ls command with minor syntax changes. There is now third alternative named exa. It is a modern replacement for ls.

  • TDF Dashboard: an open window on LibreOffice development

    Developed by Bitergia, the Dashboard is based on information retrieved from publicly available data sources, such as Git, Gerrit and Bugzilla repositories, or mailing lists archives. All tools used to retrieve, store, analyse and visualize data from repositories are based on free, open source software. The key component is GrimoireLab, a software development analytics toolset.

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Software: Gping and Git 2.14

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Development
Software
  • Gping is like regular ping, but with a graph

    The ping command is a useful way to troubleshooting network issues — but its output does look a little dull by default. Enter Gping, a cross-platform ping tool that prints a pretty graph inside the terminal.

  • [ANNOUNCE] Git v2.14.0

    The latest feature release Git v2.14.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 727 non-merge commits since v2.13.0, contributed by 66 people, 18 of which are new faces.

  • Git 2.14 Released

    Git 2.14 is now available as the latest feature update to this widely-used, open-source revision control system.

    Git 2.14 introduces support for building against PCRE v2, git diff now uses the "indent" heuristics by default, git status improvements, there's now the concept of a "repository" object as Git developers work towards making it easier to work in multiple repositories, Windows/Cygwin improvements, minor performance improvements, and many bug fixes.

Software: CloudBerry Backup, Gitano, Krita, GCompris

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KDE
Software
  • CloudBerry Backup for Linux: Review and Installation

    When it comes to backups, experience says it’s better to be safe than sorry. Better to have much than not enough – you get the point. In this article, we will present CloudBerry Backup for Linux, a cross-platform cloud backup and disaster recovery software.

  • Gitano 1.1

    Today marks the release of Gitano 1.1. Richard(s) and I have spent quite a lot of time and effort on this release, and there's plenty of good stuff in it. We also released new versions of Lace, Supple, Luxio, and Gall to go alongside it, with bugfixes and improvements.

  • Krita Foundation: Update

    When we posted the news about our tax wrangle yesterday, we did expect to make some waves. We didn’t expect the incredible response from all of you! A day later, over 500 awesome people have donated a total of €9562 (at the time of writing, check the fancy progress bar we’ve finally managed to create!). Fourteen people have joined the development fund, too! Thank you all!

  • Milestone Report 2: GSoC’17 Tasks Implementation
  • GCompris at Akademy 2017

    I didn’t blog yet about my experience during this year’s Akedemy, the annual conference and gathering of the KDE community.

    This time it was in Almería, Spain. The organizers made a wonderful work, and everything went perfectly good. The event was well covered locally, with at least three newspaper articles.

Software: TopIcons Plus, Groupware, GNU Lib C and GIMP

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • TopIcons Plus – Display All GNOME Shell Icons in the Top Panel

    TopIcons Plus is a GNOME extension that moves the tray icons (usually from the bottom left of the GNOME shell) to the top panel.

  • 5 Awesome Open Source Groupware Software Suite

    Groupware (also known as “Collaborative software”) is nothing but an app that helps users in everyday tasks such as calendar/scheduling, address books, email, forums, mailing lists, IM, wiki and more. The use of collaborative software in the work space creates a collaborative working environment. You can synchronize and share your files and photos easily using your hardware while maintaining privacy and security. Here is a list of 5 of them that you must know.

  • Tunables story continued - glibc 2.26

    Those of you tuned in to the wonderful world of system programming may have noticed that glibc 2.26 was released last night (or daytime if you live west of me or middle of the night/dawn if you live east of me, well you get the drift) and it came out with a host of new improvements, including the much awaited thread cache for malloc. The thread cache for malloc is truly a great step forward - it brings down latency of a bulk of allocations from hundreds of cycles to tens of cycles. The other major improvement that a bulk of users and developers will notice is the fact that glibc now detects when resolv.conf has changed and reloads the lookup configuration. Yes, this was long overdue but hey, it’s not like we were refusing patches for the past half a decade, so thank the nice soul (Florian Weimer) who actually got it done in the end.

    [...]

    Tunables allow you to take this idea further because there are two ways to get performance benefits, (1) by utilizing all of the CPU features that help and (2) by catering to the workload. For example, you could have a workload that performs better with a supposedly sub-optimal memcpy variant for the CPU purely because of the way your data is structured or laid out. Tunables allow you to select that routine by pretending that the CPU has a different set of capabilities than it actually reports, by setting the glibc.tune.hwcaps tunable on x86 processors. Not only that, you can even tune cache sizes and non-temporal thresholds (i.e. threshold beyond which some routines use non-temporal instructions for loads and stores to optimize cache usage) to suit your workload. I won’t be surprised if some years down the line we see specialized implementations of these routines that cater to specific workloads, like memcpy_db for databases or memset_paranoid for a time invariant (or mostly invariant) implementation of memset.

  • GIMP Motion: part 1 — basic animations

Software: QEMU for ARM. PiCluster 2.0, Rainlendar

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Software
  • QEMU for ARM Processes

    I’m currently doing some embedded work on ARM systems. Having a virtual ARM environment is of course helpful. For the i586 class embedded systems that I run it’s very easy to setup a virtual environment, I just have a chroot run from systemd-nspawn with the --personality=x86 option. I run it on my laptop for my own development and on a server my client owns so that they can deal with the “hit by a bus” scenario. I also occasionally run KVM virtual machines to test the boot image of i586 embedded systems (they use GRUB etc and are just like any other 32bit Intel system).

  • Announcing PiCluster 2.0 – Even Better Container Management

    I am pleased to announce PiCluster version 2.0!  In case you are unfamiliar with PiCluster, it is a container management tool written in Node.js used to manage Docker containers.  It has been a long journey this past year coming up with new features and trying to community involvement. In this post, I will go over the contributions that the community has made for this release and discuss the exciting new feature:  automatic container failover to different hosts.

  • Rainlendar – A Customizable Calendar App for Linux

    Rainlendar is an open source calendar application with a focus on keeping your tasks and events visibly organized on your desktop without being any hindrance to your workflow.

Software: GNOME Disks, Hyper Terminal Themes, Thunderbird Alternatives, Calibre in Debian

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Software
  • GNOME Disks Is Adding Partition Resize & Repair Features

    GParted has long been the go-to tool for disk and file-system management on Linux — but GNOME Disks is fast catching up.

  • Star Wars Themes for Hyper Terminal

    Star Wars fans can use the The Force to assist them with apt upgrades and exiting vim thanks to a new set of terminal themes from a Github far, far away… Designed for Hyper, the terminal emulator built using web technologies we mentioned at the end of last year, the themes change the terminal background design to show one […]

  • 4 lightweight email alternatives to Thunderbird

    It's easy to think other people use their computers and software in the same way you do. That they need every feature and function you rely on. That your computing choices are, or should be, their choices.

    Take, for example, email clients for the Linux desktop. Mozilla Thunderbird is arguably one of the most popular open source email applications. It's big, packed with features, and very extensible. I know a number of people who rely on Thunderbird in the same way that others rely on Emacs or Vim.

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  • Calibre in Debian

    Some news about Calibre in Debian: I have been added to the list of maintainers, thanks Martin, and the recent release of Calibre 3.4 into Debian/unstable brought some fixes concerning the desktop integration. Now I am working on Calibre 3.5.

MythTV 29 Released

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Software
  • [MythTV] v29.0 Released

    The MythTV Team is pleased to announce the release of MythTV version v29.0

    This release is the first release of the new stable branch fixes/29.

  • MythTV 29 Released

    It's been a while since last having anything to report on with the once very popular MythTV HTPC/DVR software, but today it's out with a new stable release: MythTV 29.

    Rather than being released as MythTV 0.29 with v0.28.1 being their previous stable release, instead they have bumped their major version number and are now MythTV 29. 

Software: Rapid Photo Download, Brackets, Battery Monitor, Weblate, Meteo-Qt and More

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Software
  • Rapid Photo Download – Import Photos and Videos Reliably and Efficiently

    Rapid Photo Download (RPD) is an image downloader with which you can rapidly import photos and videos from a connected smartphone and or camera into your workstation. The statement on the app’s website reads that its goal is to be the best photo and video downloader for the Linux Desktop.

    It has a simple and intuitive GUI which is easy to navigate with special thanks to its unique Timeline feature which groups photos and videos based on their time difference. This is effective for identifying photos and videos shot during different periods in either a single day or over a period of consecutive days.

  • Brackets: A Great Code Editor For You? Find Out By Yourself

    Brackets is an open-source, modern text/code editor that specifically designed for web designers but it doesn't mean if you don't do web development then you can't use it. It is lightweight, powerful, cross-platform (Linux, Mac and Windows) and focused on front-end web development (JavaScript, CSS and HTML), initially it was developed by Adobe, licensed under the MIT license and it is currently maintained on GitHub. Now it is maintained by almost 282 community contributors.

  • Battery Monitor Notifies You Current State Of The Battery

    The default battery monitor of Linux doesn't notify what is current condition of the battery juice but only when it is low. Battery Monitor comes in handy and keep you up-to-update about charging, discharging, not charging, critically low battery state of the battery. This utility is written using Python3 programming language and PyGtk3. It is available for Ubuntu and its derivatives via PPA but it can also be installed easily on any other distribution by pulling its source from github page.

  • [Video] GNU/Linux & Video Editing - Computerphile

    Rob Miles talks editing with GNU/Linux & free software.

  • Weblate 2.16: Call for translations

    Weblate 2.16 is almost ready (I expect no further code changes), so it's really great time to contribute to it's translations! Weblate 2.16 will be probably released during my presence at DebConf 17.

  • Meteo-Qt: Keep An Eye On Weather Directly From Indicator Panel

    There are various weather applications available for Linux. Meteo-Qt is an elegant weather application written in Python3 and Qt5 licensed under GNU General Public License v3, it displays weather information right on the panel and show notifications, further more you can check current week weather on its own window.

  • GSoC’17-Week #6

    I will just give an overview of what all I have worked on during the past few weeks. The main aim of the project was to integrate share. krita.org with our Krita application. It should have the ability to download the items from the site directly into default folders of the resources we choose to download. So, I created a widget content_downloader widget to perform all sorts of functionalities we needed to get from the downloader. The functions like download then install and to perform uninstall the items downloaded were added. Then search functionality, different ways to filter resources using the categories and order by method too. Used KRating API to rate the items showed inside the content downloader. Also, small functionalities like, Description viewer as labels and printing out certain data like the author and all as well were added.

  • Chromium 60 packages available

    Google released chrome/chromium 60.0.3112.78 on 25 July. My mother-in-law passed away which shifted my priorities this week, but I found some time to compile new packages. In my VM, the 64bit package creation took more than 24 hours… perhaps now is a good time to look at that Ryzen CPU and empty my savings account. This is getting ridiculous.

Software: mtPaint, Suricata, Gabedit, Mozilla, LibreOffice, and GNU Binutils

Filed under
GNU
LibO
Software
Moz/FF
  • mtPaint – A Lightweight Paint Software for Digital Photos

    mtPaint is an open source paint application for both Linux and Windows developed for the purpose of creating and manipulating pixel images.

    It was developed from scratch by Mark Tyler and maintained by Dmitry Groshev. If you hadn’t heard about it prior to reading this article it is probably because before its latest update in June 2016, its last update was in 2011!

    Update frequency not withstanding, mtPaint has a focus on being memory friendly and its latest update came with a handful of both new and improved features.

  • Suricata 4.0 released!

    We are thrilled to announce Suricata 4.0. This is a major new release, improving detection capabilities, adding new output options and more protocols.

  • Suricata 4.0 released
  • Gabedit: the Portal to Chemistry

        

    Many chemistry software applications are available for doing scientific work on Linux. I've covered several here in previous issues of the magazine, and of them have their own peculiar specialties—areas where one may work better than another. So, depending on what your research entails, you may need to use multiple software packages to handle all of the work. This is where Gabedit will step in to help you out.

  • How Could You Use a Speech Interface?

    Last month in San Francisco, my colleagues at Mozilla took to the streets to collect samples of spoken English from passers-by. It was the kickoff of our Common Voice Project, an effort to build an open database of audio files that developers can use to train new speech-to-text (STT) applications.

    What’s the big deal about speech recognition?

    Speech is fast becoming a preferred way to interact with personal electronics like phones, computers, tablets and televisions. Anyone who’s ever had to type in a movie title using their TV’s remote control can attest to the convenience of a speech interface. According to one study, it’s three times faster to talk to your phone or computer than to type a search query into a screen interface.

    Plus, the number of speech-enabled devices is increasing daily, as Google Home, Amazon Echo and Apple HomePod gain traction in the market. Speech is also finding its way into multi-modal interfaces, in-car assistants, smart watches, lightbulbs, bicycles and thermostats. So speech interfaces are handy — and fast becoming ubiquitous.

  • LibreOffice 5.4 Released with ‘Significant New Features’

    LibreOffice 5.4 serves as the final major release in the LibreOffice 5.x series (meaning LibreOffice 6.x will be next). The update is said to add “significant new features in every module” and (as always) improved Microsoft Office file compatibility.

  • LibreOffice 5.4 released with new features for Writer, Calc and Impress

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4, the last major release of the LibreOffice 5.x family, immediately available for Windows, macOS and Linux, and for the cloud. LibreOffice 5.4 adds significant new features in every module, including the usual large number of incremental improvements to Microsoft Office file compatibility.

  • GNU Binutils 2.29 Released

    Binutils 2.29 is now available as well as a Binutils 2.28.1 point release.

    Binutils 2.29 brings a lot for MIPS and SPARC users. MIPS improvements for Binutils 2.29 include support for microMIPS eXtended Physical Addressing (PXA), microMIPS Release 5 ISA for assembly/disassembly, support for the Imagination interAptiv MR2 CPU, and support for the MIPS16e2 ASE assembly/disassembly.

  • AMD Ryzen 3 Rolls Out, Linux Benchmarks Coming
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Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.