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Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Using the latest syslog-ng on Turris Omnia

    The release candidate of version 3.7 of Turris OS – the OpenWRT-based operating system of Turris Omnia routers – is now available. Among many other changes, this updates syslog-ng from version 3.0 to 3.9, so it adds about seven years’ worth of new syslog-ng features, including new parsers, filters, formatting options, destinations, and performance enhancements.

  • Ayatana Indicators

    In the near future various upstream projects related to the Ubuntu desktop experience as we have known it so far may become only sporadically maintained or even fully unmaintained. Ubuntu will switch to the Gnome desktop environment with 18.04 LTS as its default desktop, maybe even earlier. The Application Indicators [1] brought into being by Canonical Ltd. will not be needed in Gnome (AFAIK) any more. We can expect the Application Indicator related projects become unmaintained upstream. (In fact I have recently been offered continuation of upstream maintenance of libdbusmenu).

  • Komorebi – A Beautiful Wallpapers Manager with Parallax Effect for Linux

    You might not be tired of seeing still wallpapers on your desktop just yet but maybe it’s time to move on to backgrounds with cooler features anyway – parallax wallpapers.

  • Restoring tabs

    In order to be able to restore a tab in Nautilus, we have to keep a list with the minimum of information to recover the tab. This means that we’ll store the history, the view before search, in case the closed tab is a search, so that we know what was the view type before searching and last but not least, the location which was closed. Storing the location also means that the window will now keep a reference of the closed locations.

  • An Observation in UI Design

    Reading the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines gives a good idea on how to arrange elements and reduce complexity. The HIGs also emphasize on having a clear goal which helps in deciding which elements need to be arranged at all. But I did not grasp the wideness of being purpose-driven for this goal of the application which might then mean to abstract from technical details on the way. So now I try to explain this observation here.

Proprietary

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • CopyQ -An Advanced Clipboard Manager for Linux

    CopyQ is an advanced clipboard manager with editing and scripting features, that lets you intelligently manipulate your system’s clipboard content and use it within a wide range of applications. It monitors your system’s clipboard and saves its content in a way you can later paste it directly into another application.

  • RcppMsgPack 0.1.1

    A new package! Or at least new on CRAN as the very initial version 0.1.0 had been available via the ghrr drat for over a year. But now we have version 0.1.1 to announce as a CRAN package.

    RcppMspPack provides R with MessagePack header files for use via C++ (or C, if you must) packages such as RcppRedis.

  • Smack v4.2 Introduces OMEMO Support!

    I have the honour to announce the latest release of Smack! Version 4.2 brings among bug fixes and additional features like Explicit Message Encryption (XEP-0380) and Message Processing Hints (XEP-0334) support for OMEMO Multi-End-Message-and-Object encryption (XEP-0384). OMEMO was developed by Andreas Straub for the Conversations messenger (also as a Google Summer of Code project) in 2015. Since then it got quite popular and drew a lot of attention for XMPP in the media. My hope is that my efforts to develop an easy to use Smack module will result in an even broader adoption.

  • Tropico 6 Will Debut With Linux Support Next Year
  • Feral Is Bringing XCOM 2: War of the Chosen To Linux
  • Steam Direct Now Available For More Easily Getting Games On Steam

    Following the retirement of Valve's Steam Greenlight program, Steam Direct is now available as the streamlined, transparent, and accessible method for game developers to bring their games to Steam.

Wine Staging Release 2.10

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Software
  • Wine Staging Release 2.10

    The Wine Staging release 2.10 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 2.10 Released With macOS Preloader

    Building off last week's Wine 2.10 release is now the adjoining Wine-Staging 2.10 release with various experimental/testing features tacked on.

    New functionality added to Wine-Staging 2.10 includes a macOS preloader, ntoskrnl and winedevice improvements, and various other bug fixes and improvements.

  • Wine 2.10 released, nothing massive this time around

    Wine 2.10 has release recently and this release is one of the less exciting releases for Linux gamers. I imagine the Wine-Staging release isn't far behind now too.

Software: Pomodoro, Stacer, UDisks, Qtractor

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Software
  • Gnome Pomodoro – A Timer to Help Increase Your Productivity

    I have written about apps that will help you concentrate by playing ambient noises e.g. Focusli and ANoise.

    This time around I’m introducing to you a timer app. It is based on the Pomodoro technique developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s and you might have come across it before (perhaps as a Chrome extension).

    The Pomodoro technique works by breaking down work into assigned time intervals (typically 25 minutes in length) separated by short breaks and that is exactly how Gnome Pomodoro works.

  • Linux System Utility ‘Stacer’ Updated with Process Monitoring Panel, New Look

    A new version Stacer, an open-source system cleaning n’ tune-up tool for Linux desktops, is available to download. Stacer 1.0.7 ships with improved language support, adds in a choice of light or dark theme, and introduces a new processes monitor. Processes can be sorted based on PID, CPU and memory usage, etc.

  • UDisks 2.7 Released, Migrates To Libblockdev

    The UDisks project that provides a D-Bus interface for querying and manipulating storage devices issued a big release earlier this month.

  • Lay down some audio tracks with Qtractor

    Whether you're an aspiring or accomplished musician, a volunteer roadie, or an experienced audio engineer, you'll be glad to hear that there are many options for making music with open source. This month, I want to introduce you to the sequencer that I use for my audio work, whether it's mixing soundtracks for short films or making music with my band or for myself: Qtractor.

    Qtractor is a digital audio workstation, a term that's a little fuzzy, but generally implies a model based around music tracks in the tradition of a multitrack recorder with an allowance for plugins and effects. In other words, Qtractor isn't a waveform editor like Audacity, and it isn't a DJ mixer like Mixxx. It's a big, all-in-one, one-stop-shop audio studio.

Software Releases: The New and the Slightly Older

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Software

Software Releases: SDL2, Opus, Nikita, Cockpit, Chirp, G'MIC, and GNU Software (GnuTLS, Gnuastro, Remotecontrol)

Filed under
GNU
Software
OSS
  • SDL2 Gets Initial Support For JACK Audio Kit

    SDL2 now has initial support for the JACK Audio Connection Kit sound server.

    SDL2 is now capable of targeting the multi-platform JACK sound server. It's a bit surprising JACK support for SDL has taken so long, but now it's there.

  • Opus Audio Codec 1.2 Release Candidate 1 Arrives

    Just weeks after the Opus 1.2 beta, the release candidate for this forthcoming audio codec update / library has been released.

    Libopus 1.2-rc1 is now available with additional fixes and improvements over the previous work in the 1.2 series, that included some ARM optimizations, low-bit-rate quality tuning, and more.

  • Release 0.1.1 of free software archive system Nikita announced

    I am very happy to report that the Nikita Noark 5 core project tagged its second release today. The free software solution is an implementation of the Norwegian archive standard Noark 5 used by government offices in Norway.

  • Cockpit 142

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from versions 141 and 142.

  • Chirp – An Electron-Based Twitter Client for Linux

    Twitter is arguably the biggest social media network after Facebook and that comes to us as no surprise since it is clear how it appeals to many users as not just a social site for exchanging photos but also as one to that helps one stay updated with online news and connected to various networking services.

  • G'MIC 2.0

    The IMAGE team of the research laboratory GREYC in Caen/France is pleased to announce the release of a new major version (numbered 2.0) of its project G’MIC: a generic, extensible, and open source framework for image processing. Here, we present the main advances made in the software since our last article. The new features presented here include the work carried out over the last twelve months (versions 2.0.0 and 1.7.x, for x varying from 2 to 9).

  • Sixteen new GNU releases in the month of May
  • GnuTLS 3.5.13
  • Gnuastro [GNU Astronomy Utilities] 0.3 released

    The third (version 0.3) release of GNU Astronomy Utilities (Gnuastro) is now available.

  • GNU Remotecontrol: Newsletter – June 2017

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

WPS Office Really Needs GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Wine 2.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • UDisks 2.7.0 released

    A new upstream version of UDisks2 was released on Friday (June 2nd) -- version 2.7.0. People following the recent development of UDisks2 and our recent blog posts [1] [2] should know that this is a big version bump which can only mean one thing: the pull request changing UDisks to use libblockdev where possible was merged! Which is almost 100 commits with changes.

  • FastHub is an Open-Source GitHub Client Application Built From Scratch

    Many of us here are familiar with GitHub, but some of us have been looking for a good, open-source client application for the platform. This is where XDA Senior Member k0sh stepped up and created FastHub. Not only is it fast, easy to navigate, beautifully designed, and open-source, but you can download it from the Play Store or the XDA Labs repository.

  • Chirp is a Simple Electron Twitter Client [Ed: Electron makes it shallow]
  • How to verify a Fedora ISO file
  • Securing Private Keys on a Linux Sysadmin Workstation
  • How to run multiple commands in Linux Simultaneously
  • Enable Nautilus Git Integration with this Open-Source Extension
  • Puppet's Cloud Discovery: Know What's Running in Your Cloud

    The promise of automation always has been its ability to manage a wide range of tasks across all your systems, whether they're in your own data center or somewhere in the cloud. But in order to automate, you need to know what you have, and that's getting harder these days.

    We've all come across orphaned cloud VMs and instances, perhaps spun up for a quick test by a developer, created as a bit of shadow IT or merely forgotten during the press of the latest product release. Regardless of why they were created and forgotten, these instances pose quite a few risks to your time, security and budget. After all, the meter's pretty much always running on cloud instances, orphaned or not.

  • ‘Next generation of Skype’ Unveiled, But Theres No Mention of Linux Support

    Er… Only that’s it; there’s no mention of if, much less when, Linux users will be able to experience the (admittedly terrible) changes.

    For a cross-platform communication service trumpeted as being “available everywhere, so you can go anywhere”, skipping an entire platform is a bit of an oversight.

    Microsoft signs off their announcement by poking the penguin in the eye, saying Skype “…can be with you for all life’s moments, no matter where the world takes you—on your favorite devices, to smart speakers, and beyond.”

    Just not if my ‘favorite devices’ run Linux though, aye?

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