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Software

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • 3 Great Linux Apps I Never Knew Existed

    I’ve written about a lot of desktop Linux software in the nearly 8 years this site has been running. Apps, utilities, tools and clients for almost everything, from bling-laden music players to java monstrosities via photo editors and command line Twitter clients. And yet even I have not heard of every app that’s out there.

  • Temps is a Beautiful Open Source Weather App

    But when the weather is unpredictable, or to keep an eye on its plans for the coming days, we turn to weather forecast apps, websites and services.

    A slate of desktop weather apps are available for Linux. These range from basic terminal-based reports to indicator applets that unfurl all kinds of meteorological mumbo jumbo.

  • Atom 1.12

    New APIs available in Chrome 52 allowed us to take on this long-requested feature. The new APIs turned out to be less important than we originally thought but we’re nonetheless happy to report Atom users in all locales now get typical keyboard behavior in Atom’s default installation.

  • Atom 1.12 Hackable Text Editor Released with International Keyboard Support

    On November 9, 2016, GitHub's Ian Olsen was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of the Atom 1.12 open-source and hackable text editor for all supported platforms.

    Atom 1.12 has been in Beta stages of development since the release of Atom 1.11 on October 11, 2016, and it now hits the stable channel with a bunch of exciting new features, among which we can mention international keyboard support Electron 1.3.6 update, which also brings Chrome 52 along for this update.

  • 0 A.D. Alpha 21 "Ulysses" Open-Source Game of Ancient Warfare Adds New Features

    Wildfire Games was proud to announce the release of the twenty-first Alpha update to its 0 A.D. open-source game of ancient warfare for supported Linux-based operating systems, as well as Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X platforms.

    Dubbed Ulysses, the 0 A.D. Alpha 21 release features a large number of content and improvements, starting with a bunch of new maps that you'll most certainly want to conquer, as well as several new game modes, and continuing with the official introduction of the final civilization, namely The Seleucid Empire.

    Prominent gameplay features include the Herocide and Regicide, Wonder Victory, and Last Man Standing modes, new champions and buildings, the ability for Briton Crannog to act as both a dock and civic center, and support for Hellenic Royal Stoa and Persian Hall to train new Infantry Champions in the city and town phases.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • NetworkManager 1.6 to Support the systemd-resolved Local DNS Forwarder Backend

    NetworkManager developer Lubomir Rintel announced today, November 6, 2016, the availability for download of the first development snapshot towards the major NetworkManager 1.6 release of the widely-used network connection manager.

    NetworkManager 1.6 will probably launch next year and promises exciting new features, including Vala bindings for the libnm library, the ability to keep most network connection up during system shutdown, except Wi-Fi and VPN, and support for removing new connections or disconnect devices to the checkpoint/restore connection functionality.

  • PeaZip 6.2.0 Open-Source Archiving App Released with Revamped File Browser, More

    PeaZip, a free and cross-platform graphical file archiver that supports extracting and compressing of over 180 archive types, including 7-Zip, FreeArc, RAR, LHA, PAQ, ISO, UPX, 7Z, ACE, CAB, ZIP, XZ, ARJ, BZ2, and TAR was recently updated to version 6.2.0.

    PeaZip 6.2.0 appears to be a major release that updates the 7z backend to version 16.04 for Windows platforms, and introduces real-time display of cumulative progress when running simultaneous jobs to the GUI (Graphical User Interface) for the archiving and extraction operations.

  • Introducting GPS Ami

    Once upon a time, I started geotagging my photos. For that I bought a GPS logger, an Holux M-1200E. The device works great with gpsbabel, and since my photography workflow was stuck on MacOS, I used Houdah GPS (which uses gpsbabel behind the scene, BTW). Also I have been working for too long on moving that workflow to Linux and GNOME. At one point I even started to write an app I called "Magellan" to do what that MacOS tool did, as a part of my other project, Niepce. I didn't really get motivated so it went nowhere. It was written in C++ like the rest of Niepce. The technology isn't the problem here.

  • Spotify is testing a new layout for its desktop player

    As part of updates to its Windows and web desktop apps, the official Spotify for Linux client has picked up a minor redesign. Well, sort of. The company is testing a small redesign of the main player control UI in its desktop app with a sub-section of Spotify desktop users.

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: Software Development

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Development
Software
  • podlators 4.09

    This package contains the Pod::Man and Pod::Text formatters for Perl.

    This is a bug-fix release that fixes a long-standing problem with Pod::Text on EBCDIC systems. The code to handle non-breaking spaces and soft hyphens hard-coded the ASCII code points and deleted the open bracket character on EBCDIC systems.

  • gspell and LaTeXila – progress report

    In September I’ve launched two small fundraisings on gspell and LaTeXila. The two goals are now reached, thanks!

    I’ve started working on those two projects, here is a progress report.

  • PackPack: Simple Building Of RPMs & Debian Packages From Git Repos

    PackPack is a new open-source (BSD-licensed) project for building RPM and Debian packages from Git repository software sources. PackPack leverages Docker containers, semantic versioning, and can interface with the Travis continuous integration software.

    PackPack was developed by the Mail.Ru Group for automating release management of open-source and closed-source projects. It aims to reduce push-to-package time "from hours to minutes" and supports building packages of OS targets including Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, and CentOS. Building for these different targets relies upon Docker for using an OS image for that particular target.

  • The iconic text editor Vim celebrates 25 years

    Two years later, with the 2.0 release, Vim's feature set had exceeded that of vi, so the acronym was changed to "Vi IMproved," Today, having just marked its 25th birthday, Vim is available on a wide array of platforms—Windows, OS/2, OpenVMS, BSD, Android, iOS—and it comes shipped standard with OS X and many Linux distros. It is praised by many, reviled by many, and is a central player in the ongoing conflicts between groups of developers. Interview questions have even been asked: "Emacs or Vim?" Vim is licensed freely, under a charityware license compatible with the GPL.

  • ANNOUNCE: libvirt-glib release 1.0.0
  • Heads-up on NSS 3.27, Guam

    Many distributions, among which Fedora in 23 & 24, and Arch Linux, have recently shipped NSS 3.27, sometimes packaged as 3.27.0, or even 3.27.1. This release may just have triggered some confusion about disabling, enabling, and defaulting to or not, the NSS implementation of TLS version 1.3 (currently in draft). Fun!

Latest on CodeWeavers/CrossOver

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Microsoft
Software
  • The Times Are a Changing

    When did it hit me that the times were a changin’ at CodeWeavers corporate Headquarters (and no it wasn’t when Bob Dylan got awarded the Noble Peace Prize for Literature)? Maybe it was when we introduced CrossOver on a platform not in our sandbox – ANDROID. Or when we lost our COO of 14 years to a new career opportunity, or rearranged the office (everyone had to move offices and have a new office mate), or chalk painted furniture, or had an office pet for a day, or when the conference room moved, or the standard monthly company meeting date moved after 20 years in existence (revolution). AND we bribed attendance with bagels instead of donuts. Or was it when everyone went from a Linux or macOS to a Windows system?

  • Microsoft Office 2013 Working On CrossOver 16

    CodeWeavers announced this week they've hit the milestone in CrossOver 16 development where they have been able to successfully register Microsoft Office 2016 in an internal alpha build of CrossOver 16. With this support in the upcoming CrossOver 2016, Office 2013 is working with all core functionality including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Project.

  • CodeWeavers to Bring Microsoft Office 2013 to CrossOver 16 for Linux and macOS

    On the third day of November 2016, CodeWeavers, the company behind the popular, yet commercial CrossOver graphical user interface (GUI) to Wine, celebrated a major milestone, as they successfully registered Microsoft Office 2013 in the application.

    Yes, you're reading that right, the next major CrossOver release, versioned 16, will bring support for the Microsoft Office 2013 office suite. What this means for you is that you'll finally be able to install, register and use Microsoft Office 2013 on your GNU/Linux or macOS operating system using CrossOver 16, due for release later this year.

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Software and today's howtos

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Software
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Open Source Photography Software "Darktable" 2.0.7 has been Released

    Darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.

  • 2 Linux clients for Microsoft's OneDrive. Yes, they work, but...

    The Linux notes from DarkDuck blog has recently published a How-to guide for using cloud storage from the Russian company Yandex with native Linux support: Yandex.Disk.

    Of course, Yandex is not the only company that offers free and subscription-based cloud storage services. There was even a discussion about one of the alternatives in the comments for that article.

    My take on that discussion is that I would not trust my files to a company that only receives revenues from the cloud storage. It is like putting all your eggs in the same basket. That's why I would recommend you use a company with a diverse set of cash cows. How many of them are there? Not that many, I am afraid.

  • NoNotifications Indicator 0.9 Released With New Features

    NoNotifications is an Ubuntu indicator for temporarily suppressing NotifyOSD (which is used by Unity) notifications. This can be useful for presentations, when working, and so on, to prevent unwanted notifications.

  • SafeEyes Protects You From Eye Strain When Working On The Computer

    SafeEyes is an application that tries to protect your eyes from eye strain (asthenopia) by reminding you to take breaks while you're working long hours at the computer. It was created as a free and open source Linux alternative for EyeLeo, a Windows-only app.

  • Wine 1.9.22 Released
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest – Sponsors

    As I mentioned in my previous blog post we organized a hackfest to discuss all about the core GNOME experience, with emphasis on core apps and taking into account its impact in 3rd party developers too.

    But you can imagine, bringing together a not small amount of developer, designers and community in a single place involves travel costs, accommodation, an appropiate place where we can gather and discuss with internet and tables… and apart of that, small details that improves the overall experience like snacks and something to distract ourselves after a long journey, like a simple dinner all of us together.

FOSS CMS News

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Software
OSS
Drupal
  • Wix denies allegations it stole WordPress code, says it open sourced work

    A day after being on the receiving end of allegations that it not only stole code from WordPress, it also failed to contribute back to the open-source community, Wix has responded, saying that the claims against it are baseless and that its do-it-yourself website building platform has been operating in good faith.

    In an open letter to WordPress creator Matt Mullenweg, Wix chief executive and cofounder Avishai Abrahami answered every criticism leveled at his company. He admitted that Wix did use WordPress’ open source library for “a minor part of the application,” but claimed that every modification or improvement the team made was submitted back as open source. Mullenweg had said previously that Wix’s mobile app editor, which was released this month, was built using “stolen code.”

  • Wix Delivers Weak Response To Stolen WordPress Code Claims

    Recently, Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg’s accused Wix of stealing source code from WordPress and using it in the company’s mobile app “without attribution, credit, or following the license”. Wix, deciding it was best not to let Mullenweg’s stipulations go unchallenged, has fired back with a double-barrelled, if wishy-washy, reply.

    Matt Mullenweg’s letter garnered not one, but two responses from Wix: the first from CEO Avishai Abrahami and the second via the company’s lead engineer Tal Kol.

  • WordPress Creator Matt Mullenweg Blasts Wix, Avishai Abrahami Responds

    Matt Mullenweg, the creator of WordPress, is not happy with the editor used in the Wix mobile app, saying the web building service copied his platform. Wix.com's CEO Avishai Abrahami responds to Mullenweg's accusations.

    Mullenweg said in his blog that Wix's mobile app seems familiar to him, it's like he had used it before. He said he has because it's WordPress.

    "If I were being honest, I'd say that Wix copied WordPress without attribution, credit, or following the license," he said. "Wix has always borrowed liberally from WordPress - including their company name, which used to be Wixpress Ltd. - but this blatant rip-off and code theft is beyond anything I've seen before from a competitor."

  • Nasdaq Taps Open Source Tech for IR

    Nasdaq Corporate Solutions, a business line of Nasdaq, Inc., is banking on the collective input from users of Drupal open-source web content management technology to empower its platform for IR websites.

  • Moodle Installation Made Easy

    Moodle is a very popular course-management system, equivalent to Blackboard, but entirely free and open source. This short YouTube video by Moodle expert Nellie Deutsch explains how you can install Moodle in your cPanel with Softaculous in under 2 minutes.

More on Wine 1.9.22

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Software
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.22 Is Now Available

    The Wine team released yesterday another development release of their software. Version 1.9.22 has many small changes including 25 bugfixes.

  • Wine 1.9.22 Lets Linux Users Play Max Payne 2, Might & Magic Heroes IV, Tron 2.0

    A new development release of the popular, open-source and cross-platform Wine free implementation of Windows on Unix solution has been announced on October 28, 2016, versioned 1.9.22.

    Coming two weeks after the release of the previous version, namely Wine 1.9.21, the Wine 1.9.22 update is here to add even more improvements to the upcoming HID support, improve the WebServices implementation, adds experimental bitmap rendering in Direct2D, and adapts the macOS clipboard support to the new design.

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KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?