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Software

Software: OCS Store and Movit 1.6

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Software
  • OCS Store: One Stop Shop All of Your Linux Software Customization Needs

    One of the biggest selling points of desktop Linux, for me, is the centralized software distribution system. Ubuntu has Apt, Arch Linux has Pacman and Fedora’s got RPM. This centralized distribution means an increased stability, a superior integration between the apps and the operating system, and an enhanced security factor.

  • Movit 1.6 Released For GPU-Based Video Filter Library

    Movit, the "Modern Video Toolkit", that aims to provide high-quality, high-performance GPU-based video filters is out with a new release.

    The Movit 1.6 release today by Steinar Gunderson adds support for video effects that work as compute shaders. Gunderson's hopes for using more compute shaders in Movit didn't work out quite as planned with fragment shaders geberally being faster for this use-case. But this release does have compute shaders for deinterlacing as one area where it's faster.

  • Movit 1.6.0 released

    I just released version 1.6.0 of Movit, my GPU-based video filter library.

    The full changelog is below, but what's more interesting is maybe what isn't in it, namely the compute shader version of the high-quality resampling filter I blogged about earlier. It turned out that my benchmark setup was wrong in a sort-of subtle way, and unfortunately biased towards the compute shader. Fixing that negated the speed difference—it was actually usually a few percent slower than the fragment shader version, despite a fair amount of earlier tweaks. (It did use less CPU when setting up new parameters, which was nice for things like continuous zooms, but probably not enough to justify the GPU slowdown.)

    Which means that after a month or so of testing and performance tuning, I had to scrap it—it's sad to notice so late (I only realized that something was wrong as I started writing up the final documentation, and figured I couldn't actually justify why I would let one of them chain with other effects and the other one not), but it's a sunk cost, and keeping it in based on known-bad benchmarks would have helped nobody. I've left it in a git branch in case the world should change.

Software: COPR, Cockpit, Curl, Taskcluster, MKVToolNix

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Software
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for January

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • Cockpit 160

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 160.

  • Cheers for curl 7.58.0

    curl 7.58.0 is the 172nd curl release and it contains, among other things, 82 bug fixes thanks to 54 contributors (22 new). All this done with 131 commits in 56 days.

  • Time’s up to shut up and sign up for curl up

    We have just opened up the registration site for curl up 2018, the annual curl developers meeting that this year takes place in Stockholm, Sweden, over the weekend April 14-15. There’s a limited number of seats available, so if you want to join in the fun it might be a good idea to decide early on.

  • Taskcluster To Date

    Taskcluster has always been open source: all of our code is on Github, and we get lots of contributions to the various repositories. Some of our libraries and other packages have seen some use outside of a Taskcluster context, too.

  • MKVToolNix 20.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulator Released with Important Changes

    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus released a major version of his open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation utility for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms.

    MKVToolNix 20.0 is an important release that comes with major changes at code and functionality end. These include the removal of numerous deprecated functions, implementation of the cmark library as a new requirement for package maintainers, and the complete rewrite of mkvinfo’s internals.

10 Best Text Editors For Linux And Programming (2018 Edition)

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Development
GNU
Linux
Software

The year 2018 is here. Just in case you’re looking for some powerful text editor for Linux to kickstart programming new year, you’re at the right place. While the debate of the best programming editors for Linux won’t end anytime soon, there are many editors that bring an impressive set of features. While Vim, Emacs, and Nano are older and dependable players in the game, Atom, Brackets, and Sublime Text are relatively newer text editors.

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Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

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Software
  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal

    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.

  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux

    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.

  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms

    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on.

    Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.

  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively

    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’.

    The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS.

    The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

Slack as a Snap

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Software
Ubuntu
  • In a Snap, Slack Comes to Linux. Here's How To Install It

    While binaries for Slack have been available for Ubuntu and Fedora, other Linux operating systems are not so lucky. To overcome this, Canonical has released Slack as a Snap, which allows Slack to be installed and used on a greater variety of Linux distributions.

    Snapcraft is a command line tool that allows you to install containerised applications called Snaps on many different Linux distribution. As these Snap containers contain all the required dependencies that a program needs to run, it makes it very easy to create and distribute a single container that works on a variety of Linux versions.

  • Linux Users Can Now Download Slack as a ‘Snap’

    Slack is one step closer to becoming the workplace staple for businesses across the globe. The software is now available for use on Linux environments, bundled as a Snap – an application package for opensource systems.

    Tens of millions of users across the world run Linux on their systems, opting for one among its many distribution avatars. In comparison, Slack reported that over 6 million active profiles used the app daily last year, 2 million of them with paid subscriptions. The new release could open Slack up to a whole new set of customers.

  • Slack has arrived on Linux thanks to Canonical Snap

    CANONICAL HAS made the wishes of its users come true again as it brings another major app to Linux users for the first time.

    This time it's popular team platform Slack. The secret sauce is Ubuntu's "Snap" packages, a form of containerisation which puts an app into a little bubble that makes it run in the Linux environment. At Christmas, the technique was used to bring a desktop Spotify to Linux for the first time.

    The important thing here is that Snaps, first launched in 2016, run on any Linux distro, not just Canonical's own Ubuntu. Named specifically were Linux Mint, Manjaro, Debian, ArchLinux, OpenSUSE and Solus. Not only that, they work across desktop, server, cloud and IoT.

Press Coverage About Wine 3.0

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Microsoft
Software
  • Windows apps on Linux: Wine 3.0 is out now with Direct3D 10, 11 support

    Wine 3.0 is now available to help you run Windows applications and games on Linux, macOS, and BSD systems.

    Wine -- or 'Wine is Not an Emulator' -- is a compatibility layer that implements the Windows API on top of Unix and Linux, to help you run Windows apps when needed.

    Currently, about 25,000 applications are compatible with Wine, with the most popular all being games, including Final Fantasy XI, Team Fortress 2, EVE, and StarCraft.

  • Wine 3.0 is here to run Windows software on your Linux box

    When people make the switch from Windows to Linux, they often experiment with Wine. If you aren’t familiar, it is a compatibility layer that can sometimes get Windows software to run on Linux and BSD. I say "sometimes" because it isn’t a flawless experience. In fact, it can be quite frustrating to use. I suggest using native Linux software as an alternative, but understandably, that isn’t always possible.

    If you depend on Wine, or want to start trying it out, I am happy to say that version 3.0 is finally available. It is quite the significant update too, as it features over 6,000 changes!

  • Have three WINEs this weekend, because WINE 3.0 has landed

    Version 3.0 of Wine Is Not an Emulator – aka WINE – has arrived, and offers all sorts of new emulation-on-Android possibilities.

    WINE lets users run Windows applications on Linux, MacOS, Solaris, and FreeBSD, plus other POSIX-compliant operating system. To do so it “translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly”, an arrangement its developers rate as more efficient than virtualization while “allowing you to cleanly integrate Windows applications into your desktop.”

  • Wine 3.0 Released To Run Windows Apps On Linux Efficiently — Download It Here

    Just recently, we told you that the support for Linux distros in VirtualBox is about to get a lot better with the release of Linux kernel 4.16. But, what if you wish to run Windows apps on your host Linux system? For that, Wine has got your back.

Wine 3.0

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Software
  • Wine 3.0 Released

    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 3.0 is now available.

  • Wine 3.0 Officially Released with Android Driver, Direct3D 11 and 10 Support

    The Wine (Wine Is Not an Emulator) project has been updated today to version 3.0, a major release that ends 2017 in style for the open-source compatibility layer capable of running Windows apps and games on Linux-based and UNIX-like operating systems.

    Almost a year in the works, Wine 3.0 comes with amazing new features like an Android driver that lets users run Windows apps and games on Android-powered machines, Direct3D 11 support enabled by default for AMD Radeon and Intel GPUs, AES encryption support on macOS, Progman DDE support, and a task scheduler.

  • Wine 3.0 Released With Initial Direct3D 11 Support, D3D Command Stream

    The Wine camp has officially released Wine 3.0 as their annual feature update to this program for running Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

  • The big Wine 3.0 release is now officially available

    Good things come to those who wait, like a fine Wine. Today the Wine team has officially release the next stable version Wine 3.0 [Official Site].

    After around a year of development during the 2.x cycle, Wine 3.0 brings in some major changes towards better game and application support for those of you wanting to run Windows-only stuff on Linux. It's nowhere near perfect, but it's a massive advancement for the Wine project and provides a good base for them to continue onwards.

Software: MenuLibre, Speech Recognition, "Just TODO It", Slack

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Software
  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released

    The wait is over. MenuLibre 2.1.4 is now available for public testing and translations! With well over 100 commits, numerous bug fixes, and a lot of polish, the best menu editing solution for Linux is ready for primetime.

  • Speech Recognition For Linux Gets A Little Closer

    t has become commonplace to yell out commands to a little box and have it answer you. However, voice input for the desktop has never really gone mainstream. This is particularly slow for Linux users whose options are shockingly limited, although decent speech support is baked into recent versions of Windows and OS X Yosemite and beyond.

    There are four well-known open speech recognition engines: CMU Sphinx, Julius, Kaldi, and the recent release of Mozilla’s DeepSpeech (part of their Common Voice initiative). The trick for Linux users is successfully setting them up and using them in applications. [Michael Sheldon] aims to fix that — at least for DeepSpeech. He’s created an IBus plugin that lets DeepSpeech work with nearly any X application. He’s also provided PPAs that should make it easy to install for Ubuntu or related distributions.

  • Announcing "Just TODO It"

    Recently, I wished to use a trivially-simple TODO-list application whilst working on a project. I had a look through what was available to me in the "GNOME Software" application and was surprised to find nothing suitable. In particular I just wanted to capture a list of actions that I could tick off; I didn't want anything more sophisticated than that (and indeed, more sophistication would mean a learning curve I couldn't afford at the time). I then remembered that I'd written one myself, twelve years ago. So I found the old code, dusted it off, made some small adjustments so it would work on modern systems and published it.

  • Linux users can now get Slack as a snap package

    Canonical has announced the general availability of the collaboration platform Slack, as a snap package. The move will allow Linux users to get setup with the platform and begin collaborating on their work more easily. Any Linux distribution with snap support can head over to the snapcraft website, download the package, and begin using it.

Software: VirtualBox, Dillinger, FBReader, KDE Discover

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Software
  • Here’s Why Running Linux Distros In VirtualBox Is About To Get Much Better

    With the help of hypervisors like Oracle VirtualBox, one can run operating systems within another pre-installed host operating system and try out the features. When it comes to Linux, the beginners are often advised to try out user-friendly Linux distros in a virtual machine before making the brave jump.

  • Dillinger – A Cloud-Enabled HTML5 Markdown Editor

    Our post today is about another Markdown editor – one that has been termed “the last Markdown editor you will ever use“, presumably because of its full-featured Markdown support and free accessibility.

    We told you about StackEdit the last time so today, we introduce to you, Dillinger.

    Dillinger is an AngularJS powered online HTML5 Markdown editor that is mobile ready, cloud-enabled, supports live preview and offline document storage.

  • FBReader – A Lightweight & Multi-Platform Ebook Reader

    FBReader is an open source multi-platform ebook reader with a minimalist UI and support for a wide range of ebook formats including etf, mobi, ePub, plain text, and HTML, among others.

    It is lightweight and customizable with options for users to choose their preferred fonts, dictionaries, bookmarks, page-turning animations, colors, etc.

    FBReader users have automatic access to a network of book libraries from which they can download and sync both free and paid ebooks to their devices. If you are in need of a modern, lightweight, and ever-improving ebook application for your Linux, Windows, Mac, or smartphone, we recommend you try out FBReader.

  • KDE's Discover Snap Support Is Maturing Too

    While KDE Discover's Flatpak support was declared "production ready", that isn't the only app sandboxing tech they are working on: their Ubuntu Snap support is also coming together nicely.

  • A Fistful of Ports Updates

    Here’s a list of KDE-related stuff (mostly official FreeBSD ports) the KDE-FreeBSD team handled recently. You could call it “a week in the life of some packagers”, packagers who are also otherwise busy with $work-work.

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Software: Clay, Inkscape, VirtualBox, Thunderbird

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Software
  • New York magazine is making its CMS available open-source

    There’s a short history of publishers fancying themselves as technology companies and building a business selling their tech to other publishers. Publishers realized that building a whole new side business around licensing their tech is a headache and that they needed to focus on what they’re good at, and leave the tech to others.

    New York magazine is trying out a different approach. It built its own content management system (publishers like to give their homegrown CMSes cute names; this one is called Clay, for the magazine’s founder Clay Felker) in 2015 and then licensed the software to the online magazine Slate. Slate started using Clay a year ago and was set to fully migrate its site to Clay this week. But instead of New York charging Slate a licensing fee, Slate is paying New York in the form of code. The CMS is open-source, and developers from both titles contribute to it.

  • An introduction to Inkscape for absolute beginners

    Inkscape is a powerful, open source desktop application for creating two-dimensional scalable vector graphics. Although it's primarily an illustration tool, Inkscape is used for a wide range of computer graphic tasks.

    The variety of what can be done with Inkscape is vast and sometimes surprising. It is used to make diagrams, logos, programmatic marketing materials, web graphics, and even for paper scrapbooking. People also draw game sprites, produce banners, posters, and brochures. Others use Inkscape to draft web design mockups, detail layouts for printed circuit boards, or produce outline files to send to laser cutting equipment.

  • Linux Support in VirtualBox is about to get a LOT Better

    VirtualBox makes it easy to try Linux distros without replacing your current operating system or engaging in a game of reboot leap frog.

    But things are about to get even easier. Soon you won’t need to install the VirtualBox Guest Additions package to get a fully integrated Linux experience with your host OS.

  • Have You Taken the Thunderbird Redesign Survey?

    Monterail and Thunderbird are now working on the same team.

    Yes, that Monterail, the Poland-based development company whose stunning Thunderbird mock-up went viral last year, before becoming a real, working Thunderbird theme.

    “We got in touch with […] the Thunderbird core team to discuss possibilities. We wanted to establish how to enhance user retention and make Thunderbird more user-friendly for potential and current users. We also learned how Thunderbird is built which helped with planning iterations,” Monterail’s Krystian Polański explains in a new blog post on the company’s website.

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More in Tux Machines

Qt/KDE: Qt5 in Debian and Slackware, QtCreator on Android, KDE Discover, and Plasma's 10th Anniversary

  • moving Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics, update II
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 32 weeks which gives us around 5.65 packages fixed per week, aka 0.85 packages per day. Obviously not as good as we started (remaining bugs tend to be more complicated), but still quite good.
  • [Slackware] Plasma5 – April 18 edition for Slackware
    The KDE-5_18.04 release of ‘ktown‘ for Slackware-current offers the latest KDE Frameworks (5.45.0), Plasma (5.12.4) and Applications (18.04.0). The Qt5 was upgraded to 5.9.5. Read the README file for more details and for installation/upgrade instructions. Enjoy the latest Plasma 5 desktop environment.
  • Perfect Debugging Experience with QtCreator on Android
    While I was working on a yet-to-be-announced super secret and cool Qt on Android project, I had to do a lot of debugging. This way I found that debugging Qt apps on Android using QtCreator was ok, but it had some issues, which was kinda frustrating.
  • Discover – Easily Install Software on KDE Neon Desktop
    KDE Discover is an Open Source GUI app installer that comes packaged with KDE Neon. It was particularly built from the ground up to be compatible with other modern Linux distros with emphasis on beauty and convenience. KDE Discover was also designed to allow for an intuitive User Experience as it features a clean and clear layout with a high readability value which makes it easy to browse, search for, install, and uninstall applications.
  • Almost 10 years of Plasma-Desktop
    Last week I was at work and start to listen my boss said: “We need to show this to our director”. So I went to my coworker table to see what was happening. So they were using Gource to make a video about the git history of the project. Gource is a software version control visualization tool. So that triggered in my mind some memories about a friend talking about Python and showing how the project as grow in this past years, but I never discovered about the tool that made that amazing video. So well, I started to make some Gource videos, and because my love about KDE Community, why not make one about it?

GNOME: Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04, Bug Fix for Memory Leak

  • Getting Real GNOME Back in Ubuntu 18.04 [Quick Tip]
    Ubuntu 18.04 uses a customized version of GNOME and GNOME users might not like those changes. This tutorial shows you how to install vanilla GNOME on Ubuntu 18.04. One of the main new features of Ubuntu 18.04 is the customized GNOME desktop. Ubuntu has done some tweaking on GNOME desktop to make it look similar to its Unity desktop. So you get minimize options in the windows control, a Unity like launcher on the left of the screen, app indicator support among some other changes.
  • The Infamous GNOME Shell Memory Leak
    at this point, I think it’s safe to assume that many of you already heard of a memory leak that was plaguing GNOME Shell. Well, as of yesterday, the two GitLab’s MRs that help fixing that issue were merged, and will be available in the next GNOME version. The fixes are being considered for backporting to GNOME 3.28 – after making sure they work as expected and don’t break your computer.
  • The Big GNOME Shell Memory Leak Has Been Plugged, Might Be Backported To 3.28
    The widely talked about "GNOME Shell memory leak" causing excessive memory usage after a while with recent versions of GNOME has now been fully corrected. The changes are currently staged in Git for what will become GNOME 3.30 but might also be backported to 3.28. Well known GNOME developer Georges Stavracas has provided an update on the matter and confirmed that the issue stems from GJS - the GNOME JavaScript component - with the garbage collection process not being fired off as it should.

Graphics: AMDVLK, XWayland and Vulkan

  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Stack Gets Updated With More Extensions, Optimizations & Fixes
    AMD developers maintaining their official Vulkan cross-platform driver code have pushed their end-of-week updates to their external source repositories for those wanting to build the AMDVLK driver on Linux from source. This latest AMDVLK push updates not only their PAL (Platform Abstraction Layer) and XGL (Vulkan API Layer) components but it also updates their fork of the LLVM code-base used for their shader compilation.
  • EGLStreams XWayland Code Revised Ahead Of X.Org Server 1.20
    It's still not clear if the EGLStreams XWayland support will be merged for xorg-server 1.20 but at least the patches were revised this week, making it possible to merge them into this next X.Org Server release for allowing the NVIDIA proprietary driver to work with XWayland.
  • Vulkan 1.1.74 Released With Minor Fixes & Clarifications
    Vulkan continues sticking to the "release early, release often" mantra with the availability today of Vulkan 1.1.74.

Xfce Releases/Updates

  • Xfce Settings 4.12.3 / 4.13.2 Released
    Fixes galore! Xfce Settings 4.12.3 and 4.13.2 were released on March 18th with several improvements, feature parity, and translations.
  • Xfce PulseAudio Plugin 0.4.0 (and 0.4.1) Released
    Stable as a rock. Xfce PulseAudio Plugin hit a new stable milestone with the 0.4.0 release. This release wraps up the awesome development cycle we’ve had on this over the last few months and is recommended for all users.
  • Xfce Settings Update Brings Better Multi-Monitor Support
    While still waiting on the long-awaited Xfce 4.14, out this weekend is an Xfce Settings 4.14.2 preview release as well as an Xfce Settings 4.12.3 stable series update. Both of these Xfce Settings updates bring better multi-monitor support, including visualization of all display configuration states, visually noting if two displays are mirrored, always drawing the active display last so it's on top, and a number of fixes pertaining to the multi-monitor display handling from this Xfce desktop settings agent.