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Software

VirtualBox 6.1.28 Released with Initial Support for Linux 5.14 and 5.15 Kernels

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Linux
News
Software

VirtualBox 6.1.28 is here about three months after VirtualBox 6.1.26 to introduce initial guest and host support for the Linux 5.14 and 5.15 kernel series. This means that you can now use VirtualBox on GNU/Linux systems powered by Linux kernels 5.14 or 5.15, as well as to run distributions powered by Linux 5.14 or 5.15 kernels inside virtual machines.

In addition, this release introduces initial support for the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.5 operating system, improves the detection of kernel modules in Linux hosts to prevent unnecessary rebuilds, fixes a display corruption on Linux Mint systems, and adds bindings support for Python 3.9.

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SoftMaker FreeOffice 2021 is Now Available to Download

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Software

As with previous versions of this free (but not open source) alternative to Microsoft Office, the full suite of apps is available across Windows, macOS, and Linux with no feature limitations or patchy coverage.

While SoftMaker says this is a “completely revised version” that is “seamlessly compatible with Microsoft Office” file formats, both new and old, it’s hard to know what’s new in FreeOffice 2021 specifically as there’s no official change-log detailing the changes between this and the previous FreeOffice release.

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Free Software and More

Filed under
Software
  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 October 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week.

  • The Intelligent Edge – Coming Soon to Arm DevSummit 2021 [Ed: What a ridiculous coredump of mindless buzzwords by SUSE]

    For those of us not keeping score, we’re at the cusp of a technology shockwave that will fundamentally change the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Some call it the fourth industrial revolution (I4). While the third industrial revolution was all about process and product automation, the fourth industrial revolution (from an IT perspective) will center on the fusion of IT and OT.

  • Five of Monday's 'All Things Open' Presentations We Wouldn't Miss - FOSS Force

    If you couldn’t make it to Raleigh, North Carolina to attend this year’s All Things Open, you’re in luck. You can go to the conference’s web site and register for the free online version of the event, which will include live streaming of all presentations happening at the event (including all keynotes), as well as a large number of prerecorded presentations that were put together specifically for the online audience.

    That’s how we at FOSS Force are planning on attending this year, although downtown Raleigh is only a couple of hours away by car.

  • Community Member Monday: Hlompho Mota

    I am a native of Lesotho, and a dreamer and a person who aspires to make changes. Currently I’m working in a business that serves other businesses in Lesotho to get recognition in the market, and generally grow to become more self-reliant. Other than my business, I do try and dabble in technology and try to understand how it works – and get a sense on how it can be relevant in the area of life that I live in at this moment.

    But besides that, I consider myself as lifelong learner and I hope that the learning will continue for the rest of my life. Currently, I’m a self-taught developer trying to participate in as many open-source projects as possible, with the hope of bringing much-needed development to my part of the world.

Study of Editable Strokes for Inking

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KDE
Software

So, with Krita 5.0 nearing completion. There’s been some discussion about what we’ll do next.

On of the proposed topics has been to replace our calligraphy tool with something that can produce nice variable width editable lines.

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Micro – simple and feature-filled command line text editor

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Software

Many users prefer using command line-based applications for their day-to-day work, even if there are graphical alternatives. Of course, for some use cases, it might not be a choice, like logging into a system through SSH, but in many cases, we cannot resist the speed and elegance that the command line offers.

Many command-line text editors are reasonably popular, like Vim, Emacs, or Nano. But we will take a look at a different editor today, which is called Micro. The specialty of this editor is that it is straightforward to use, with familiar keyboard shortcuts, while also containing several advanced features. As a result, it suits beginners and power users all the same. We will introduce and explore Micro in this article.

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4 Linux tools to erase your data

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Software

One of the best ways to keep your data secure is by only writing data to an encrypted hard drive. On a standard drive, it's possible to view data just by mounting the drive as if it were a thumb drive, and it's even possible to display and recover even deleted data with tools like Scalpel and Testdisk. But on an encrypted drive, data is unreadable without a decryption key (usually a passphrase you enter when mounting the drive.)

Encryption can be established when you install your OS, and some operating systems even make it possible to activate encryption any time after installation.

What do you do when you're selling a computer or replacing a drive that never got encrypted in the first place, though?

The next best thing to encrypting your data from the start is by erasing the data when you're finished with the drive.

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Annotator: Open-Source App for Linux to Easily Add Essential Annotations to Your Images

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Software
OSS

When it comes to image manipulation and editing, there are many tools available. However, options like GIMP are not necessarily the solution to everything.

Yes, GIMP offers plenty of features for beginners and advanced users, but it could be time-consuming to learn something and apply visual enhancements to any image you want.

Annotator is an impressive open-source tool that lets you do a lot of things in a couple of clicks.

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Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Adobe Photoshop

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Software
OSS

Adobe is a large multinational computer software company with over 22,000 employees. Its flagship products include Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere Pro, XD, Acrobat DC, as well as the ubiquitous the Portable Document Format (PDF). Their products are wrapped up and marketed as the Creative Cloud, a subscription-only way of accessing more than 20 desktop and mobile apps and services for photography, design, video, web, UX, and more.

We are long-standing admirers of Adobe’s products. They develop many high quality proprietary programs. It’s true there are security and privacy concerns in relation to some of their products. And there’s considerable criticism attached to their pricing practices. But the fundamental issue regarding Adobe Creative Cloud is that Linux isn’t a supported platform. And there’s no prospect of support forthcoming.

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Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software
  • Best 20 Free Open-source CCTV, NVR and DVR solutions

    CCTV or closed-circuit television system makes use of camera networks and monitor to watch and monitor of interior and exterior of a property.

    Companies, museums, art galleries, and houses are using CCTV networks for video surveillance and security.
    There are dozens of commercial CCTV software packages.

    However, as they vary in price and features, they are also not for everyone.

    In this article, we present a collection of free and open-source CCTV and DVR (Digital video recorder) solutions.

    Our primary goal is to promote open-source and offer reliable alternatives to commercial solutions.

  • AV1 Codec Library libaom v3.2 Brings More Performance Optimizations

    Libaom 3.2 is now available as the latest version of the official AOMedia/Google-developed AV1 Codec Library. With libaom 3.2 comes compression efficiency improvements, perceptual quality improvements, and a variety of speed-ups and memory optimizations.

  • Apache Software Foundation moves to CDN distribution for software

    It’s not enough to create and release useful software. As an open source foundation, a major part of the Apache Software Foundation’s (ASF) job is to help get that software into the hands of users.

    To do so, we’ve relied for many years on the contributions of individuals and organizations to provide mirror infrastructure to distribute our software. We’re now retiring that system in favor of a content distribution network (CDN), and taking a moment to say thank you to all the individuals and organizations who helped get ASF software into the hands of millions of users.

  • Bareflank Hypervisor 3.0 Pre-Release Debuts With Many Changes

    Bareflank 3.0 has been a big undertaking more than one year in development. Bareflank 3.0 improvements have included work to support AMD SVM virtualization, initial work on the ARM/AArch64 support, native Windows support not needing Cygwin, migrating their codebase to C++14, and a variety of other enhancements.

  • Open Source Initiative: October News & Updates [Ed: Sadly, OSI already has a Microsoft 'mole' (Aeva Black) inside its board. So you know where OSI might be going... to make matters worse, Microsoft is 'double-dipping' with bribes to OSI, both as "GitHub" and Microsoft]

    I consider myself lucky to have witnessed open source changing the world, watching it go from a niche revolutionary idea to owning a place just about everywhere in everyday life.

    It spread because of the principles it embeds: Non discrimination, fairness, collaboration, community and innovation. These principles of open source were written in the Open Source Definition to simplify our way of interacting with the digital world.

    There’s much we can accomplish together as a community; it was great to jump right in with the Practical Open Source Information event. For now, know that I’m committed to open communication, and ready to hear any questions, concerns or ideas you have. Book an appointment for an informal chat during office hours on Fridays.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: October Edition [Ed: Mozilla continues to outsource its operations to Microsoft's proprietary software monopoly, so one can see where Firefox is generally going]
  • Next FOSDEM: 5 & 6 February 2022

    We are painfully aware that we're not only compressing our schedules, but yours as well.

    I don't think we ever said it this early, but we're all looking forward to FOSDEM 2023.

  • 21 Open-source tools to fix your site broken links and improve your SEO

    Broken links in your website mean that your site is not reliable, and it does not offer a good, satisfying user experience.

    The broken links are not just visible to your visitors, they are checked and monitored by search engines, which leads to bad SEO.

    Broken links can be internal to a site's internal page or external to external websites or resources. That's does not matter much, they have still broken links.

  • Projectify: A TiddlyWiki powered Personal Project manager

    TiddlyWiki is a lightweight, portable multipurpose note-taking app. Created by Jeremy Ruston and powered by a strong community, TiddlyWiki became productivity tool for many.

    Because it is highly customizable and portable, you can use it for almost anything. Besides, It has a growing ecosystem filled by its community with plugins, hacks, and themes.

    I have been using TiddlyWiki for years, mainly to take notes, record my thoughts and track my progress while learn or study anything. I also use it as a personal to-do list and a project manager.

    Everything is a post, every post uses tags, and posts are connected.

Announcing Istio 1.11.4

Filed under
Software

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.11.3 and Istio 1.11.4

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Kernel and Graphics: Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel teases 'software-defined silicon' with Linux kernel contribution – and won't say why

    Intel has teased a new tech it calls "Software Defined Silicon" (SDSi) but is saying almost nothing about it – and has told The Register it could amount to nothing. SDSi popped up around three weeks ago in a post to the Linux Kernel mailing list, in which an Intel Linux software engineer named David Box described it as "a post-manufacturing mechanism for activating additional silicon features".

  • RadeonSI Lands Another "Very Large" Optimization To Further Boost SPECViewPerf - Phoronix

    In recent months we have seen a lot of RadeonSI optimizations focused on SPECViewPerf with AMD seemingly trying to get this open-source OpenGL driver into very capable shape moving forward for workstation GL workloads. Hitting Mesa 22.0-devel today is yet another round of patches for tuning SPECViewPerf.

  • Vendors Including NVIDIA Talk Up New OpenCL Extensions For Vulkan Interop, NN Inference - Phoronix

    Last Friday night we spotted OpenCL 3.0.9 with several new extensions included. Today The Khronos Group is formally announcing these latest OpenCL additions focused on Vulkan interoperability as well as neural network inferencing. These new extensions for OpenCL 3.0 include an integer dot product extension for neural network inferencing (cl_khr_integer_dot_product) with a focus on 8-bit integer support.

  • RadeonSI Enables NGG Shader Culling For Navi 1x Consumer GPUs - Phoronix

    As another possible performance win for RadeonSI Gallium3D as AMD's open-source Radeon OpenGL driver on Linux systems is enabling of NGG culling for Navi 1x consumer graphics processors rather than limiting it only to newer Navi 2x (RDNA2) GPUs. Merged on Monday was a patch to enable shader culling for Navi 1x consumer SKUs with no longer limiting it to Navi 2x / GFX10.3 or when using various debug options. This culling was also enabled for Navi 1x GPUs but only for the "Pro" graphics SKUs.

Databases: Managing Database Migrations, PostgreSQL-Related Releases

KDE Plasma 5.18.8, Bugfix Release for October

Plasma 5.18 was released in February 2020 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more

today's howtos

  • Speak to me! – Purism

    My trusty laptop’s speakers gave up the ghost. I don’t like to sit around in headphones all the time, I don’t have any other speakers, and the replacements are still being manhandled by the postman. I’d get used to the austerity if I hadn’t started missing calls from a friend. That’s unacceptable! But what am I supposed to do? Buy extra gadgets just to throw them away after a week? Nope, I’m not that kind of a person. But hey – I have a Librem 5! It has a speaker. It’s open. I have control over it, and I’m a hacker too. So I should be able to come up with a hack to turn it into a speaker for my laptop, right? Pulseaudio to the rescue. I look through the guide. There it is: forwarding audio over a network.

  • How To Install CSF Firewall on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install CSF Firewall on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, CSF is also known as “Config Server Firewall” is a free and advanced firewall for Linux systems. We should use ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) since this CSF have more advanced and comprehensive features than other firewall application such as UFW, Firewalld, or Iptables. Compared to the other Linux firewall application, CSF is more user-friendly and effective which is mostly used by web hosting providers. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • What are the differences between SQL and MySQL | FOSS Linux

    Due to many organizations, businesses, companies, and firms making an online presence, databases have become the core requirement for their daily operations. A database in a layman’s language is defined as a collection of data stored and organized electronically to ensure easy retrieval, access, management, and manipulation of business data. Most business successes depend on databases since they aid in storing essential and relevant data in a central position. Besides, databases also help facilitate communication of crucial business info such as employee profiles, sales transactions, customer profiles, marketing campaigns, product inventory, etc. Furthermore, databases have ensured that the company’s data is secure through various authentication mechanisms like access specifiers, user logins, and sign-ups. This article will talk about the difference between the two popular relational databases SQL and MySQL.

  • How to install Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Friday Night Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Use an SSH Key with Non-root Users - Unixcop

    You can SSH to your Linux instance as root with the key. However, the key doesn’t work for non-root users. So we will illustrate two methods to use SSH keys with non-root users.

  • Allow Port Through Firewall in Ubuntu 20.04 - Linux Nightly

    Ubuntu comes with ufw (uncomplicated firewall) installed by default. This is a frontend for iptables/nftables, the built-in Linux firewall, and is meant to make firewall management a bit easier. In this guide, you’ll see how to add rules to the firewall to open ports and allow certain services to have access through the firewall on Ubuntu.

  • Some regex tests with grep, sed and AWK

    In my data work I regularly do searching and filtering with GNU grep (version 3.3), GNU sed (4.7) and GNU AWK (4.2.1). I don't know if they all use the same regex engine, but I've noticed differences in regex speed between these three programs. This post documents some of the differences.

  • Upgrade to Fedora 35 from Fedora 34 using DNF – If Not True Then False

    This is guide, howto upgrade Fedora 34 to Fedora 35 using DNF. This method works on desktop and server machines. You can also upgrade older Fedora installations (example Fedora 33/32/31/30) directly to Fedora 35. I have tested this method on several machines, but if you have problems, please let me know. Always remember backup, before upgrade!

  • Jenkins: Basic security settings - Anto ./ Online

    Jenkins contains sensitive information. Thus it must be secured, like any other sensitive platform. Thankfully Jenkins provides you with many security options. This guide will show you all the essential bits that you need to know. You access these features on the Configure Global Security page under manage Jenkins.

  • LDAP query from Python · Pablo Iranzo Gómez's blog

    Recently, some colleagues commented about validating if users in a Telegram group were or not employees anymore, so that the process could be automated without having to chase down the users that left the company. One of the fields that can be configured by each user, is the link to other platforms (Github, LinkedIn, Twitter, Telegram, etc), so querying an LDAP server could suffice to get the list of users. First, we need to get some data required, in our case, we do anonymous binding to our LDAP server and the field to search for containing the ‘other platform’ links.