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Hardware

Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

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Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection.

TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification.

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Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Intel: Graphics Changes For Linux 4.15 and Clear Containers 3.0

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Hardware
  • Intel Preps Their First Batch Of Graphics Changes For Linux 4.15

    The first batch of drm-intel-next changes are ready to be queued in DRM-Next as feature work for eventually merging to mainline come the Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Announcing Intel® Clear Containers 3.0!

    The Clear Containers team has been working on the next generation of Clear Containers and today that work culminates in the release of Clear Containers 3.0!

    Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI* compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime ) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment.

  • Intel Unleashes Clear Containers 3.0, Written In Go

    Clear Containers 3.0 as Intel's latest Linux container tech is now written in the Go programming language rather than C. They are also now making use of virtcontainers as a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware-virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 also adds support for a virtio-blk storage back-end and other improvements for security and performance.

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

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Hardware
Software
  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly

    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update.

    We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.

  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched

    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8.

    The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC

    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.

  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen

    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.

  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD

    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.

  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years

    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.

Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi Zero W: Now Available via Humble Bundle!

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

My new book is now shipping! And it's being launched via a terrific Humble Bundle of books on electronics, making, Raspberry Pi and Arduino.

Humble Bundles, if you haven't encountered them before, let you pay what you want for a bundle of books on related subjects. The books are available in ePub, Mobi, and PDF formats, without DRM, so you can read them on your choice of device. If you pay above a certain amount, they add additional books. My book is available if you pay $15 or more.

You can also designate some of the money you pay for charity. In this case the charity is Maker Ed, a crowdfunding initiative that supports Maker programs primarily targeted toward kids in schools. (I don't know any more about them than that; check out their website for more information.)

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Devices: Fairphone, Amino, Nordija, Purism

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
  • End of Support for Fairphone 1: Some Unanswered Questions

    I previously followed the goings-on at Fairphone a lot more closely than I have done recently, so after having mentioned the obsolescence risks of the first model in an earlier article, it was interesting to discover a Fairphone blog post explaining why the company will no longer support the Fairphone 1. Some of the reasons given are understandable: they went to market with an existing design, focusing instead on minimising the use of conflict minerals; as a result various parts are no longer manufactured or available; the manufacturer they used even stopped producing phones altogether!

    A mention of batteries is made in the article, and in community reaction to the announcement, a lot of concern has been expressed about how long the batteries will be good for, whether any kind of replacements might be found, and so on. With today’s bewildering proliferation of batteries of different shapes and sizes, often sealed into devices for guaranteed obsolescence, we are surely storing up a great deal of trouble for the future in this realm. But that is a topic for another time.

  • Amino and Nordija move between Android and Linux

    Amino and Nordija are to showcase a new dual mode platform that enables operators to seamlessly move between Android and Linux-based TV delivery.

    It’s designed to provide a consistent state-of-the-art user experience.

  • Purism and KDE to Work Together on World's First Truly Free Smartphone

Linux Hardware: Asustor, Advantech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Devices: Purism’s Librem 5, ASUSTOR, and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux: Jim Zemlin's Hypocrisy, Open Source Summit 2017 Roundup, AMD Graphics and CPU Failures/Bugs

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?