Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Linux Hardware: Intel and Qualcomm

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Drops 2 Exciting Clues About The Future Of Clear Linux OS For 'Normal' Desktop Users [Ed: Intel is still trying, more desperately over time, to generate interest in its flailing GNU/Linux distro while putting back doors in every chip and doing other profoundly dubious things]

    I'm not a developer, a server administrator or anyone with advanced programming skills. I'm just a normal desktop Linux user who appreciates speed, stability, great aesthetics and ease of use. As such I've been keeping a close eye on Intel's Clear Linux, and have been insisting it's worth paying attention to. Intel's recent community efforts around Clear Linux -- and even certain touches they've implemented to the installer -- have given me the strong belief that the company is looking to serve people just like me in the near future. So I asked the burning question directly, and Intel just answered it.

  • Touch panel PCs offer a choice of 64 models mixing different sizes and Intel chips

    Taicenn’s Linux-friendly, IP65 protected “TPC-DCM” industrial panel PCs let you choose between 6th or 7th Gen U-series Core, Apollo Lake, or Bay Trail CPUs with 2x GbE, SATA, optional wireless, and capacitive touchscreens between 15 and 24 inches.

    Taicenn, which last year introduced an Intel Bay Trail based, in-vehicle TPC-DCXXXC1E panel PC has now returned with an industrial series of TPC-DCM panel PCs. You can choose between 64 configurations, with 8x Intel processor choices and 8x screen sizes: 15.0, 2x 15.6, 17.0, 18.5, 19.0, 21.5 and 24.0-inch models ranging from 1024 x 768 to 1920 x 1080 pixels.

  • Three Linux router boards showcase Qualcomm IPQ4019

    Three router SBCs that run Linux on Qualcomm’s quad -A7 IPQ4019 have reached market: The Dakota DR4019 with 2x GbE, optional SFP and Wave2 WiFi, MikroTik’s RB450Gx4 with 5x GbE and PoE, and a $200 Kefu DB11 dev kit.

AMD Navi and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • More AMD Navi GPUs show up in a Linux driver

    A since-deleted commit for a Linux driver update hints at 4 new AMD Navi GPUs.

  • Libdrm Picks Up Support For AMD Navi

    As another one of the prerequisites for landing the AMD Radeon RX 5000 series "Navi" support in Mesa, the libdrm bits have just been merged.

    Libdrm is the Mesa DRM library that is needed for sitting between the Linux kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) interfaces and the user-space components (depending upon the driver, as is required by like RadeonSI). Libdrm also ends up being used by the DDX drivers like xf86-video-amdgpu and other components as well depending upon the driver. As of a short time ago, the Navi bits landed in libdrm Git.

    The Navi support here isn't all that exciting and mostly boilerplate code for a new generation for a new family ID, a new member for a tile steering override for GFX10, GDDR6 as a new video memory type, and the largest addition is simply the new tests for VCN 2.0 video decode support.

You Can Now Buy Linux Notebooks Powered by Zorin OS from Star Labs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The makers of the Zorin OS Linux operating system announced today that they partnered with a computer manufacturer to offer users notebooks powered by Zorin OS.

The wait is over, as Zorin OS has partnered with Star Labs, a UK-based computer manufacturer specialised in selling Linux-powered notebooks, to offer you two new laptops running the latest version of Zorin OS, fully customized and optimised for these powerful and slick notebooks.

"Creating a Linux desktop experience that’s accessible to everyone has always been our mission at Zorin OS," reads today's announcement. "Today we’re taking the next step in this mission by making Zorin OS easier for the masses to access: on new computers powered by Zorin OS."

Read more

Pinebook Pro, the $199 Linux Laptop, Gets Keyboard & Bluetooth Spec Bumps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Pine64, the company behind a range of popular single-board computers, have shared some more details on the upcoming PineBook Pro Linux laptop.

[...]

As well as working on the PineBook Pro the fine Pine64 folks are also working on a $79 Linux-based tablet with detachable keyboard: the PineTab.

And, like its clam-shell cousin, it too is getting an upgrade of over what was originally planned.

The PineTab will now ship with 64GB eMMC (up from 32GB). It’ll also boast an M.2 adapter for user expansion and connectivity options…

Read more

Linux on Devices: Ibase, Adlink, and Google

Filed under
Hardware
  • 3.5-inch SBC features Intel Gemini Lake

    Ibase has launched a 3.5-inch “IB822” SBC with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC with 16GB DDR4, 2x SATA, 2x GbE, triple displays, and 2x M2 expansion slots.

    Ibase’s IB822, which is not to be confused with its similarly 3.5-inch, circa-2008 IB882 SBC running the Atom Z500 or the more recent, Apollo Lake based IB818 3.5-inch model, features the latest Intel Atom class Gemini Lake system-on-chips. This is the first Gemini Lake 3.5-inch SBC we’ve seen, and the only SBC aside from Hardkernel’s Odroid-H2 SBC. Meanwhile, the delayed, Gemini Lake based LattePanda Delta SBC is available for pre-order starting at $385 with shipments expected in August.

  • Railway computer takes on AI analytics with Nvidia Quadro graphics

    Adlink’s Linux-ready, EN50155-certified “PIS-5500” railway analytics computer offers Intel 6th or 7th Gen Core i7 CPUs with AI-enabled Nvidia Quadro graphics. I/O includes 10x GbE, 2x or 4x SATA, 2x mini-PCIe, and M.2.

    Railway computers are growing more sophisticated and starting to specialize. Whereas Adlink’s Apollo Lake based DMI-1210 touch-panel computer is designed for train driver controls, its rugged new PIS-5500 is aimed at both wayside and onboard real-time video/graphics analytics applications. These include ticket-free check-in, more accurate arrival-time predictions, personalized infotainment and onboard services, real-time track heath diagnostics, and rapid emergency response.

  •   

  • Google won't be making its own Android or Chrome OS tablets any more

               

                 

    A spokesperson from Google said: “Chrome OS has grown in popularity across a broad range of form factors and we’ll continue to work with our ecosystem of partners on laptops and tablets. For Google’s first-party hardware efforts, we’ll be focusing on Chrome OS laptops and will continue to support Pixel Slate.”

  •         
     

  • Google's officially done making its own tablets

               

                 

    A couple of clarifying points here: First, none of this has any impact on Pixel phones. Pixel phones and Pixel computers are two different departments, and the roadmap in question is related exclusively to the latter. (The same applies to the various Google Home/Nest products. What we're talking about today has absolutely zero impact on any that stuff.)

                 

    And second, when Google talks about a "tablet," it means a device that detaches completely from a keyboard base or doesn't even have a physical keyboard in the first place — not a swiveling two-in-one convertible like the Pixelbook. The Pixelbook, with its attached keyboard and 360-degree hinge, falls under Google's definition of "laptop." Blurred lines, baby.

Raspberry Pi pHAT detects indoor pollution, and optionally, outdoors too

Filed under
Hardware

Pimoroni’s $57 “Enviro+” pHAT for the Raspberry Pi can detect indoor air quality, temperature, pressure, humidity, light, and noise. You can hook up an optional “PMS5003 Particulate Matter Sensor” for detecting outdoor pollution.

In 2016, Pimoroni launched a $20 Enviro pHAT board for the Raspberry Pi. The name was a bit misleading, however, since its environmental sensors were limited to a temperature/pressure sensor, light sensor, and whatever you could hook up via the 4-channel analog to digital converter (ADC). Now, the UK-based company has returned with a 45-Pound ($57) Enviro+ pHAT that loses the accelerometer/magnetometer, but adds humidity and analog gas sensors, a MEMS microphone for detecting noise levels, and a 1-inch color LCD screen.

Read more

Fedora 30 test on laptop with Nvidia - Back in 2010

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware
Reviews

I think the results are obvious, and they speak for themselves. Alas, it would seem that if you want to use Fedora with a setup like the above, then you'll be either very lucky or you're going to face a torrent of problems. But then, Linux has always been, to use a somewhat stupid analogy, like saying you should only drive your car on Mondays on roads that have green sidewalks, and then you will be fine. The whole not-our-problem, use hardware that's "friendly" is nonsense, because people don't have infinite money, choice or expertise, especially since alternative operating systems offer all they need, plus a full range of hardware freedom.

My Fedora 30 test on the G50 was decent - that's a simple Intel graphics box - but even that one used to have millions of problems with Linux - Fedora wouldn't boot until I'd done a BIOS update, and for three years, almost every distro had network disconnect problems. On this box, we're seeing more of what I showed you in the Fedora 29 test. Fedora and Nvidia graphics are not a good fit. Add to that my home dir import woes, the performance woes, the Wireless woes, you get the picture. Feels like we've gone back many years into the past. I'd actually prefer if distros WARNED that the device is not certified or approved or expected to work and refuse to install, than install and then throw a whole bucket of hissy. I will still run an in-vivo upgrade on the Lenovo machine, because that's what I promised to do, but this is a big, big disappointment.

Read more

Linux Distributions for IoT: A Guide to Making the Right Choice

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux distributions may be popular for IoT initiatives, but making the wrong choice can have dire consequences.

Read more

Also: Kontron unveils Whiskey Lake-UE module and updates Coffee Lake COM to 9th Gen chips

Your first robotic arm with Ubuntu Core, coming from Niryo

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Niryo has built a fantastic 6-axis robotic arm called ‘Niryo One’. It is a 3D-printed, affordable robotic arm focused mainly on educational purposes. Additionally, it is fully open source and based on ROS. On the hardware side, it is powered by a Raspberry Pi 3 and NiryoStepper motors, based on Arduino microcontrollers. When we found out all this, guess what we thought? This is a perfect target for Ubuntu Core and snaps!

When the robotic arm came to my hands, the first thing I did was play with Niryo Studio; a tool from Niryo that lets you move the robotic arm, teach sequences to it and store them, and many more things. You can programme the robotic arm with Python or with a graphical editor based on Google’s Blocky. Niryo Studio is a great tool that makes starting on robotics easy and pleasant.

Read more

Slimbook’s New All-in-One Linux PC Looks a Little Bit Familiar…

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Spanish Linux computer company Slimbook has unveiled its brand new all-in-one “Apollo” Linux PC — and it looks… Well, it looks familiar.

The Apollo AIO swaps the curved screen of its immediate predecessor for a 23.6-inch IPS LED display running at a decent 1920×1080 resolution. The screen is apparently a “crystal coated panel” that improves the appearance of colours.

Internally, the AIO is configurable according to needs. There’s a choice of Intel i5-8500 and Intel i7-8700 processor, up to 32GB RAM, integrated Intel UHD 630 4K graphics, and a veritable smorgasbord of storage options.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

5 Best and Free Desktop Email Clients for Linux and Windows

If you are looking for free Email clients for Linux and Windows – here are 5 of them we list which you can try and consider for casual or professional uses. Web based email is popular today which can be accessed via browser or mobile apps. However, big and medium enterprises, generic users still prefers native desktop email clients for heavy and office uses. Microsoft Outlook is the most popular desktop email client which is of course not free and you have to pay huge licence fee to use. There are multiple options for free desktop email clients available. Here are the best 5 free and open source email clients which you can go ahead and try then deploy for your needs. Read more

On the Road to Fedora Workstation 31

So I hope everyone is enjoying Fedora Workstation 30, but we don’t rest on our laurels here so I thought I share some of things we are working on for Fedora Workstation 31. This is not an exhaustive list, but some of the more major items we are working on. Wayland – Our primary focus is still on finishing the Wayland transition and we feel we are getting close now, and thank you to the community for their help in testing and verifying Wayland over the last few years. The single biggest goal currently is fully removing our X Windowing System dependency, meaning that GNOME Shell should be able to run without needing XWayland. For those wondering why that has taken so much time, well it is simple; for 20 years developers could safely assume we where running atop of X. So refactoring everything needed to remove any code that makes the assumption that it is running on top of X.org has been a major effort. The work is mostly done now for the shell itself, but there are a few items left in regards to the GNOME Setting daemon where we need to expel the X dependency. Olivier Fourdan is working on removing those settings daemon bits as part of his work to improve the Wayland accessibility support. We are optimistic that can declare this work done within a GNOME release or two. So GNOME 3.34 or maybe 3.36. Once that work is complete an X server (XWayland) would only be started if you actually run a X application and when you shut that application down the X server will be shut down too. Read more

Videos: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0, Enso OS 0.3.1, OpenShift and Upbound

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 overview | The best! ...until OpenMandriva does better.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Enso OS 0.3.1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Enso OS 0.3.1. Enjoy!

  • Video from KubeCon 2019: Red Hat in Barcelona

    From May 21-25, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage rolled into KubeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona, Spain, a rare chance to bring different parts of the Red Hat community together from across Europe and the U.S. While there, we took the opportunity to sit down with members of the teams that are shaping the next evolution of container native storage in Red Hat OpenShift and throughout the Kubernetes ecosystem. We’ve put together highlights from Barcelona, where you’ll see what happens when you gather 7,700 people from the Kubernetes ecosystem in one place. You’ll also hear from members of Red Hat’s team in Barcelona—Distinguished Engineer Ju Lim, Senior Architect Annette Clewett, Rook Senior Maintainer Travis Nielsen and others—about what’s exciting them now, and what’s ahead.

  • Bassam Tabbara: Next 10 Years Should Be About Open Cloud

    During KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Barcelona, we sat down with Bassam Tabbara – CEO and founder of Upbound to talk about the company he is building to make the next decade about Open / Open Source Cloud, breaking away from the proprietary cloud. Tabbara shared his insights into how AWS, Azure and the rest leverage open source technologies to create the proprietary clouds. He wants to change that.

189 Lives Changed - By Linux

I've been at this business of putting Linux-powered computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged kids since 2005, one way or the other. That's 14 years and north of 1670 computers placed. Throughout those years, I've shared with you some of our successes, and spotlighted the indomitable spirit of the Free Open Source Community and The Linux Community as a whole. I've also shared with you the lowest of the low times for us, and me personally. But through it all, Reglue has maintained our mission of placing first-time computers into the homes of financially disadvantaged students. By onesies and twosies mostly. A multi-machine learning center here and there, by far the greatest is the Bruno Knaapen Technology Learning Center. And as much of a challenge as that was, we have another project of even greater measure. If you don't know who Bruno Knaapen is, I suggest you follow the link. Bruno will go down in history as a person who helped more people adapt to Linux than anyone, at any time. Bruno's online contributions are still a treasure trove of Linux knowledge. So much, individuals pay out of their pocket to make sure that information remains available. Going down that list, you will come to understand the tenacity and knowledge that man shared with his community. I was one of those that learned at his elbow. Read more