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Hardware

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

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Hardware
  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC

    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.

  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.

  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio

    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.

  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments

    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.

  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop

    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer.

    However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.

  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core

    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board.

    Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

TinkerOS Android 13.11.0.4 Released

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Android
Hardware
Debian

Asus has released a new version of their TinkerOS Android distribution for the Asus Tinker Board. It’s still powered by Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow running on a 3.10.0 kernel. But unlike the previous release, Android 13.11.0.4 is not classed as a beta release. The release seems pretty stable.

The TinkerOS Android release offers a few notable improvements including some handy bug fixes. The previous Android image produced fuzzy text on some HDMI monitors. The only way to obtain sharp text was to reset the HDMI resolution after each boot. This issue is fixed in the new release. The release also fixes a volume consistent issue in the setting and notification bar.

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Intel’s “Euclid” robotics compute module on sale for $399

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Linux
Hardware

Intel has launched its “Euclid” robotics compute module, which runs Ubuntu on an Atom x7-Z8700, and offers a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi, and sensors.

When Intel demonstrated its Intel Euclid robotics controller at last August’s Intel Developer Conference, the company gave no indication of its release date or even if it would be more than a proof of concept. The candy-bar sized module is now available for order as part of a $399 Intel Euclid Development Kit, with shipments due by the end of the month. A Euclid community site has gone live with tutorials and documentation.

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Arduino shows off LoRa gateway and node shields

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Linux
Hardware

Arduino is prepping a “LoRa Gateway Kit” to bring LoRa wireless to its Linux-driven Arduino Tian, plus a “LoRa Node Kit” for the Arduino Primo.

At the Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino showcased its new Arduino LoRa Gateway and LoRa Node shields that run on Arduino boards. Due to arrive later this year, the boards will be offered in a LoRa Gateway Shield Kit for the Linino Linux-enabled Arduino Tian, and a LoRa Node Shield Kit designed for the Arduino Primo or other Arduinos with at least 32KB of flash.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Compact, rugged Apollo Lake computer has swappable SATA

    Axiomtek’s tough, Linux-ready “eBOX100-312-FL” embedded computer offers a Celeron N3350 SoC, a SATA bay, and 2x mini-PCIe, HDMI, GbE, and USB 3.0 ports.

  • Rugged, Linux-ready Qseven module taps Apollo Lake

    The “MSC Q7-AL” is a Qseven COM with Intel Apollo Lake, triple display outputs, and options including -40 to 85°C support, 64GB eMMC, and a 3.5-inch carrier.

  • Ubuntu-ready SMB net appliance has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Aaeon’s “FWS-2271” network appliance offers Intel Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 16GB RAM, 4x to 6x GbE ports, 2x mini-PCIe slots, and shock/vibration resistance.

    The FWS-2271 network appliance for SOHO and SMB customers has updated Aaeon’s earlier Intel Braswell-based FWS-2260. Instead of Braswell, you get a choice of Intel Apollo Lake generation dual-core Celeron N3350 or quad-core Pentium N4200, both with 6W TDP. The Ubuntu-friendly device supports features including firewall, VPN, load balancing, software defined WAN (SD-WAN), Unified Threat Management (UTM), wireless Network Access Controller (NAC) and Virtual Customer Premise Equipment (vCPE).

Pi Desktop: This kit turns your Raspberry Pi into a Linux desktop

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Pi Desktop kit from Premier Farnell -- the largest manufacturer of the Raspberry Pi -- includes an add-on board containing: an mSATA interface, an intelligent power controller (plus real-time-clock and battery); a heat sink; a USB adapter (Micro-Type A); spacers and screws -- and the box to keep it all in.

The company said the kit can help Raspberry Pi fans turn the board into a Pi into a "fully featured Linux-based desktop" computer "within minutes" which can then be connected to a display via the HDMI interface.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Nougat-flavored Nano-ITX SBC targets voice control

    Intrinsyc’s “Open-Q 212” SBC runs Android 7 on a quad -A7 Snapdragon 212, and offers special audio features for developing voice controlled devices.

  • Crowd funding the Radio access technology

    At Lime we have a mission to democratize wireless networks and to bring disruptive technology to the cellular market which will enable the service providers to deploy, maintain and upgrade their network at a fraction of today’s cost. Lime manufactures advanced RF integrated circuits called FPRFs (Field Programmable RF), also known as Software Defined Radios, which are fully programmable dual transceivers. Our chips cover all the cellular channels used globally, which makes them ideal for applications such as radio access for cellular and IoT.

  • This Mega-Sensor Makes the Whole Room Smart

    Laput, a graduate student studying computer-human interaction at Carnegie Mellon University, built the gadget as part of a project he calls Synthetic Sensors. He says it could be used to do things like figure out how many paper towels you’ve got left, detect when someone enters or leaves a building, or keep an eye on an elderly family member (by tracking the person’s typical routine via appliances, for example). It’s being shown off this week in Denver at the CHI computer-human interaction conference.

  • Thin, tough Mini-ITX board runs Linux on Apollo Lake

    Adlink’s rugged “AmITX-AL-I” is a thin Mini-ITX board based on Intel Apollo Lake. It offers triple and 4K displays, plus mini-PCIe, PCIe, and mSATA.

    Adlink briefly announced the AmITX-AL-I when unveiling several Intel Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” COMs back in November. The board now has a product page, although it’s still tagged as “preliminary.”

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linksys is making its first modem / router hybrid

    Linksys, a networking company that makes both routers and modems, is now releasing a router / modem hybrid device that combines the two into one. While these kinds of devices aren’t exactly new, it is Linksys’s first shot at making one [...]

  • Congatec proposes API and middleware spec for COMs

    Congatec has launched a “ComX” standard for computer-on-module API and middleware spanning COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC form-factors.

    At the Embedded Systems Expo & Conference (ESEC) in Japan this week (May 10-12), Congatec announced an “extended standardization initiative” called ComX. The proposed standard builds upon existing computer-on-module hardware standards such as COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC to standardize APIs and middleware, including its new Cloud API. The spec also includes some hardware standardization for COM integration with carrier boards.

  • OK Google: make this Nest hack a standard feature

    This easy (“at your own risk”) hack can unlock a Nest thermostat’s “Cool” mode in heater-only installations, allowing control of a heater’s ventilation fan as though it’s an A/C.

  • Clustering system supports up to 72 ARM modules

    Christmann’s “RECS|Box” evaluation platform and server enclosures can cluster up to 72 Toradex Apalis COMs, and offer GbE and KVM switching.

    Toradex announced that Christmann Informationstechnik + Medien GmbH & Co. KG has launched several RECS|Box cluster-computing platforms for Toradex’s ARM-based, Linux-friendly Apalis computer-on-modules. The systems work with any of Toradex’s SODIMM-style, pin-compatible Apalis-brand modules, including the i.MX6-based Apalis iMX6, Tegra K1 based Apalis TK1, and the soon-to-ship, i.MX8-based Apalis iMX8, among others.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Announcing coreboot 4.6

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are happy to announce the April 2017 release of coreboot, version 4.6.

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More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.