Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Eclipse IoT survey reveals growing role for Linux and Arm

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The Eclipse Foundation released the results from its latest IoT Developer Survey of 1,717 Eclipse developers, finding growing use of Linux (76 percent), Arm (70 percent), and MQTT (42 percent).

The results of the Eclipse Foundation’s 2019 IoT Developer Survey are out, this time with a larger 1,717-developer sample compared to only 502 in the 2018 survey. The survey was conducted by the Eclipse IoT Working Group in cooperation with member companies including Bosch Software Innovations, Eurotech, and Red Hat. The Eclipse Foundation’s various social media channels and websites promoted the survey, as did Eclipse IoT member companies.

The survey was not limited to embedded developers. Two out of three respondents said their organizations are either deploying Internet of Things solutions now or will do so in the next 18 months. Some projects appear to be longer-range than that considering that 80 percent of respondents said they are active in IoT work.

Read more

Devices: SiFive, AMD and NUC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • SiFive Launches 64-Bit Embedded Core

    SiFive has launched the S2 Core IP Series at the Linley Spring Processor Conference in Santa Clara. The S2 Core IP Series is a 64-bit addition to SiFive’s 2 Series Core IP and brings advanced features to SiFive’s smallest microcontrollers.

    The S2 Series further adds to SiFive’s extensive silicon-proven, embedded core IP portfolio. It comprises the 2, 3, 5, and 7 Core IP Series in E (32-bit) and S (64-bit) variants.

  • AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000 Pairs Dual Core Zen CPU + Vega 3 Graphics @ 12~25 Watts
  • Ryzen R1000 SoC offers dual Zen and triple Vega cores with a 12-25W TDP

    The Ryzen Embedded R1000 offers the same Zen CPU and Vega GPU cores as the V1000 while providing “3x generational performance improvement per watt” compared to the R-Series Merlin Falcon. The Linux-friendly chips are hardware and software compatible with the V1000.

  • Fanless NUC

    I didn’t monitor the temperature change too closely. It seems the fanless case keeps my CPU at least 10 degrees Celsius cooler than the Intel case. As the Akasa case is entirely metal it’ll ruin the WiFi/Bluetooth reception. The case does have the option to install an external WiFi antenna, but it doesn’t include the proper wire to do that. I’ve bought that from AliExpress for 5.72 EUR.

Devices: Linux Support on ASRock and Avalue Hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Whiskey Lake shows up on a Linux-friendly industrial mini-PC

    ASRock has unveiled a fanless, Linux-ready “iBox-8265U” mini-PC with Intel’s latest Whiskey Lake CPUs, up to 32GB DDR4, a SATA bay, 2x GbE, 4x USB, triple displays, and extended temp support.

    ASRock Industrial Computer’s 171.8 x 150 x 71.5mm iBox-8265U is the first 8th Gen Whiskey Lake U-series based mini-PC we’ve seen. Several Whiskey Lake based SBCs have broken cover, however, including Aaeon’s UP Xtreme. The FanlessTech story that alerted us to the product calls it a barebone mini-PC, suggesting that the OS is optional. The product page says it supports Linux 4.6 and Windows 10.

  • Intel Core based thin Mini-ITX supports extended temperatures

    Avalue’s Linux-friendly “EMX-KBLU2P” is a thin Mini-ITX board with 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs, triple displays, 2x GbE, 2x SATA, 2x M.2, 4x USB 3.0, serial and GPIO interfaces, and -20 to 70°C support.

    Avalue announced a thin Mini-ITX board for signage, PoS, kiosk, AiO PCs, and industrial applications. Like the company’s EMX-SKLUP thin Mini-ITX board, the new EMX-KBLU2P supports Intel’s 6th Gen Skylake Core and Celeron processors, and it can also load 7th Gen Kaby Lake models. Windows 10 and Linux are on tap — the Kaby Lake configurations require higher than Linux kernel 4.7.

12 Single Board Computers: Alternative to Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Looking for a Raspberry Pi alternative? Here are some other single board computers to satisfy your DIY cravings.

Raspberry Pi is the most popular single board computer right now. You can use it for your DIY projects or can use it as a cost effective system to learn coding or maybe utilize a media server software on it to stream media at your convenience.

You can do a lot of things with Raspberry Pi but it is not the ultimate solution for all kinds of tinkerers. Some might be looking for a cheaper board and some might be on the lookout for a powerful one.

Whatever be the case, we do need Raspberry Pi alternatives for a variety of reasons. So, in this article, we will talk about the best ten single board computers that we think are the best Raspberry Pi alternatives.

Read more

Open Hardware/Modding and 3-D Printing

Filed under
Hardware
  • Open-source and modular WiFi phone is hacker-friendly

    Now running on Kickstarter is a campaign to commercialize a minimalist open-source and hacker-friendly Voice-over-IP phone, which owners could use as a versatile and well-packaged multi-tool for their projects.
    While today's smartphones have evolved into powerful computers, they are often too complex and tightly integrated to be opened-up by the majority of hackers. By design, they also tend to leak private data to third parties (through built-in apps, OS, and network operation). Ben Wilson, the electronic engineer behind California-based HackEDA which officially runs the WiPhone Kickstarter campaign, wants to help users regain control over their phone, a device they can easily take apart or incorporate into different projects, while controlling where the data goes.
    “It's sort of like the phone James Bond would carry if he was also a programmer” explains Wilson, noting that the firmware is open and the hardware is expandable so one could add a LoRA radio, a mega battery back, or cover the back of it with an LED array. While the WiPhone is more intended to be an Arduino-compatible hacking tool than a phone, it is self-contained and also works well as a backup phone to make free VoIP calls over any WiFi connection.

  • Industrial 3D printing goes skateboarding

    Plastic pulled from the waste stream can find new use with the Gigabot X, an open source industrial 3D printer. A team shows how three Gigabot-printed sporting goods -- skateboard decks, kayak paddles and snowshoes -- can help burgeoning makerspaces and fab labs economically sustain their 3D printing centers.

  • RepRap Recyclebot Turns Plastic into 3D Filament for $700
  • Open Source Furniture: Download, Print And Build Online
  • Furniture can Now Be Downloaded and Printed, Thanks to Opendesk

    It seems like anything can be done online nowadays, including getting your furniture! Now, this is not your typical online electronic catalog where you click on your choice of item and somebody comes over to deliver. No. This is something more innovative than that.

  • Maryland students stand to revolutionize Alzheimer's diagnostics: BTN LiveBIG

    Conversely, Synapto uses an open source, 3D-printed portable electroencephalogram (EEG) headset and proprietary mathematical biomarker analyses to comb through a patient’s brainwaves. Their hope is that this will lead to quicker and cheaper diagnosing that can be done in a physician’s office.

AMD: AMDVLK, EPYC and Radeon ROCm

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • AMDVLK 2019.Q2.1 Driver Has Some Performance Enhancement & Fixes

    MD has volleyed their latest AMDVLK open-source Vulkan driver code, their first publish push in more than two weeks, making it their first push of the new quarter.

    AMDVLK 2019.Q2.1 is the new release and it's been updated against the Vulkan 1.1.105 headers, allows shared memory to be CPU-visible, enables VK_EXT_memory_priority regardless whether it's supported by all external queues, and offers a performance optimization for Total War: WARHAMMER II.

  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 5.1 Too - Performance Wins

    Last week I passed along some initial benchmark results after finding Intel Cascade Lake offering up some performance improvements when using the in-development Linux 5.1 kernel. The exciting news is this doesn't appear to be Cascadelake-specific or even Intel specific as with the Dell PowerEdge EPYC 2P server I am also seeing some nice performance improvements in the same benchmarks.

    I am still in the midst of conducting more Linux 5.1 kernel benchmarks albeit perpetually short on time but should have some additional Linux 5.1 data out next week. But in being curious whether Linux 5.1 is also looking up on AMD hardware, I ran some quick Linux 5.0.7 stable benchmarks against the latest Linux 5.1 Git kernel...

  • Radeon ROCm 2.3 Released With Many Improvements

    AMD today unexpectedly released Radeon Open Compute "ROCm" 2.3 as the newest feature release for this open-source Radeon GPU compute stack.

    ROCm 2.3 is a fairly hefty update and includes a lot of library improvements and other tooling enhancements for those using ROCm to provide GPU compute support on Linux systems. ROCm 2.3 offers per-GPU memory usage reporting via the rocm-smi utility, updated ONNX parser handling for MIVisionX, a new Python API and many other improvements to MIGraphX, multi-GPU support for Caffe2, Tensile optimizations for BLAS and other BLAS library improvements, and Int8 support for MIOpen.

Luxmeter Meets Linux

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The hardware in question was a PCE-174 luxmeter, which came with an uncooperative Windows application as standard. This simply wouldn’t do, so [ThePhil] set about developing a Linux version in Python. This was achieved through the aid of documentation, not of the PCE-174, but its sibling from another corporation – the Extech HD450. The two meters were similar enough that the Extech’s better documentation was able to fill in the gaps of [ThePhil]’s understanding.

Read more

More Linux on devices:

  • Toughened up in-vehicle PC offers triple mini-PCIe slots

    DFI’s rugged “VC230-BT” in-vehicle computer is equipped with an Intel Bay Trail SoC with 2x GbE, 5x USB, and 3x serial ports plus 3x mini-PCIe slots for storage and wireless add-ons. DFI has launched a rugged embedded computer for in-vehicle and fleet management applications

  • ZigBee hub builds on Raspberry Pi

    Dresden-Elektronik has launched two ZigBee home automation gateways: an RPi-based “Phoscon Gateway” and a “ConBee II” USB stick. The gateways run the company’s deCONZ Zigbee Gateway software paired with a new mobile app.

    Dresden-Elektronik announced the release of a ZigBee-enabled home automation hub based on a Raspberry Pi 3 SBC, as well as a second-gen USB dongle for enabling laptops and other Linux and Windows computers with a ZigBee gateway. The 151.22-Euro ($170) Phoscon Gateway and 33.57-Euro ($38) ConBee II USB dongle are compatible with “almost all known manufacturers of commercial and DIY Zigbee devices, such as Philips Hue, IKEA Tradfri, OSRAM Lightify, Xiaomi Aqara, Innr, XBee Series 2, Trust Zigbee, and Dresden Elektronik’s own FLS ballasts,” says the Dresden, Germany based company.

Avoid the Trash Heap: 15 Great Uses for an Old PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

For the first time in seven years, PC sales are forecast to go up by the tiniest increment—0.3 percent—which means you probably own an aging personal computer. Now is the time to upgrade, explore a 2-in-1, or go entirely mobile with your computing. But what do you do with the old PC?

You may be tempted to go the easy route and just junk it. But don't do that. If that laptop or desktop was created any time in the last decade, you'd be surprised by how much life you (or others) can get out of it. I'm not talking about limping along, but of ways to bring an old PC back to useful life.

You may need to do some light upgrades here and there; more RAM and a big new storage drive may benefit some (okay, probably all) of these projects. In many cases, the PC will require separate access to the internet and/or the ability to get software written to a USB flash drive to install on that old junker.

Take a gander at the options. You'll be glad you kept that old PC around.

Read more

Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 7

Filed under
KDE
Hardware
Reviews

When I started my Slimbook & Kubuntu journey, I didn't know where it would end. And I still don't. But half a dozen reports later, I am much more confident into what kind of experience awaits me day in, day out. What I really value in software are two main qualities: stability and predictability, the kind of stuff one must have for their production setup. So far, this laptop and its blob of code are delivering nicely, reliably.

Another facet of this journey is its randomness. I typically have a very strict routine when it comes to distro reviews, but here, I'm letting the challenges surprise me. I am using the system, and if and when a use case occurs, I handle it. For better or worse. Well, you can definitely read all about that in the previous articles. Now, let's see what happened over the last handful of moonrises.

Read more

SOMs based on RK3399 and PX30 SoCs target IoT

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

The RK3399-based SOM-RK391 and the Rockchip PX30-based SOM-RP301 are a pair of SOMs launched by Arbor. The boards both support Linux and Android. A carrier board supporting these, and future Arbor Arm-based SOMs is provided as well.

Arbor Technology has introduced a pair of System-on-Module (SOM) products both based on Rockchip SoCs, the RK3399-based SOM-RK391 and the Rockchip PX30-based SOM-RP301. Both modules run Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Android 9.0. Along with the pair of modules, the company has also released the PBA-9000-A, its SOM-Series, single pin-out design carrier board.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Nebra Anybeam turns your Raspberry Pi into a pocket home cinema projector

TVs are available to buy in truly huge sizes these days, and with 4K (and upwards) resolution, movies and TV shows really come to life. But there’s something even more magical about watching a film projected onto a screen or a wall. With the right setup, it can be like having a cinema in your home. You don’t necessarily need to spend a fortune on a projector though. Nebra Anybeam can turn your Raspberry Pi into a cinema projector that you can slip into your pocket and take anywhere. Read more Also: Nebra AnyBeam - world's smallest pocket cinema projectors

Back in the Day: UNIX, Minix and Linux

I don't remember my UCSD email address, but some years later, I was part of the admin team on the major UUCP hub hplabs, and my email address was simply hplabs!taylor. Somewhere along the way, networking leaped forward with TCP/IP (we had TCP/IP "Bake Offs" to test interoperability). Once we had many-to-many connectivity, it was clear that the "bang" notation was unusable and unnecessarily complicated. We didn't want to worry about routing, just destination. Enter the "@" sign. I became taylor@hplabs.com. Meanwhile, UNIX kept growing, and the X Window System from MIT gained popularity as a UI layer atop the UNIX command line. In fact, X is a public domain implementation of the windowing system my colleagues and I first saw at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. PARC had computers where multiple programs were on the screen simultaneously in "windows", and there was a pointer device used to control them—so cool. Doug Englebart was inspired too; he went back to Stanford Research Institute and invented the mouse to make control of those windows easier. At Apple, they also saw what was being created at PARC and were inspired to create the Macintosh with all its windowing goodness. Still, who doesn't love the command line, as Ritchie and Kernighan had originally designed it in the early days of UNIX? (UNIX, by the way, is a wordplay on a prior multiuser operating system called Multics, but that's another story.) Read more

Python Programming Leftovers

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • USB Support In Chrome OS 75 Will Make Linux Incredibly Versatile
    Chrome OS Linux instances are on the cusp of becoming immensely more useful and versatile based on a recent change spotted by Keith I Myers in the beta-specific Developer Channel following an update to version 75.0.3759.4. That's because while the update inevitably introduced some new bugs that will need to be squashed before a final release, it also included full support for USB devices on the Crostini side of the equation.
  • Old computer? Linux can give it a new lease on life
    The operating system is called Linux and was created in 1991 by Finnish student Linus Torvalds. He released Linux as open source which meant that any good programmer could tinker with it and improve upon the original. Today Linux is a popular free alternative for Windows and Mac computers and used by millions of people. The beauty is that Linux requires much less processing power and memory than Windows and is perfect for older computers.
  • At Least 27% Of Gentoo's Portage Can Be Easily LTO Optimized For Better Performance
    entooLTO is a configuration overlay for Gentoo's overlay to make it easy to enable Link Time Optimizations (LTO) and other compiler optimizations for enabling better performance out of the Gentoo packages. GentooLTO appears to be inspired in part by the likes of Clear Linux who employ LTO and other compiler optimization techniques like AutoFDO for yielding better performance than what is conventionally shipped by Linux distributions. The GentooLTO developers and users have wrapped up their survey looking at how practical this overlay configuration is on the massive Portage collection.  The initial GentooLTO survey has been going on since last October and they have collected data from more than 30 users. The survey found that of the Gentoo Portage 18,765 packages as of writing, at least 5,146 of them are working with the GentooLTO configuration.