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Hardware

Pi-lovers? There are two new OSes for you to bite

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Owners of dimunitive Raspberry Pi computers rejoice! Alpine has emitted version 3.8.0 of its super light Linux distribution, with some special attention given to the latest iteration of the hardware.

While it has been possible to get Alpine on the Pi for some time – Raspberry Pi 2 owners have been able to get it working since version 3.2.0 – this is the first version to add support for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and also offer an arm64 (aarch64) image to ease deployment.

The Pi 3 Model B+ packs a surprising amount of power into a small package, rocking a 64 bit 1.4GHz processor and gigabit ethernet (over USB 2.0). The 1GB RAM (unchanged from the previous Model Cool should give the slimline Alpine incarnation of Linux more than enough headroom, depending what else you decide to run.

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Devices/Embedded: Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), Raspberry Pi, Raspbian, Timesys

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Raspbian Update

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian
  • Raspbian update: first-boot setup wizard and more

    After a few months of hiding in a dark corner of the office muttering to myself (just ask anyone who sits near me how much of that I do…), it’s time to release another update to the Raspberry Pi desktop with a few new bits and a bunch of bug fixes (hopefully more fixes than new bugs, anyway). So, what’s changed this time around?

  • Raspberry Pi's Raspbian Gets New Setup Wizard, New PDF Viewer

    The Raspberry Pi folks have released a new version of their Debian-based Raspbian Linux distribution to end out June.

    This June 2018 update to Raspbian features several user-facing improvements for those using the Raspbian desktop. First up on new installations is now an initial setup wizard to help guide new users to using the OS. This new setup wizard should help with localization, WiFi/network setup, and other settings.

Raspberry Pi 3 B+ wins hacker board reader survey

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ won our 2018 reader survey as the most popular community-backed, Linux/Android hacker board under $200, followed by the UDOO X86 and Odroid-XU4.

The results are in for our latest hacker board survey, which we ran on SurveyMonkey in partnership with Linux.com. Survey participants chose the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, as the favorite board from among 116 community-backed SBCs that run Linux or Android and sell for under $200. All 116 SBCs are summarized in our recently updated hacker board catalog and feature comparison spreadsheet.

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Expandable, Apollo Lake based MintBox Mini 2 starts at $299

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Linux Mint project has released the rugged MintBox Mini 2 mini-PC based on the Apollo Lake powered Compulab Fitlet2, with options including PoE, HDD, and CAN. The system ships with the new Linux Mint 19 “Tara” distro.

In March, Compulab and the Linux Mint project announced a MintBox Mini 2 (MBM2) replacement for the earlier, AMD A10 based MintBox Mini Pro mini-PC. Built around the Celeron J3455 based Fitlet2 mini-PC, the MBM2 is now available starting at $299. Since the March announcement, Compulab has revealed some new features, including new FACET expansion cards for 2.5-inch HDDs, PoE, CANbus, and more.

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RK3399 SBC offers dual Type-C with DP and optional PoE

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Libre Computer unveiled a “ROC-RK3399 (Renegade Elite)” SBC that runs Android Oreo or mainline Linux 4.19+ and offers GbE with PoE, HDMI 2.0, 2x USB Type-C with DP, 3x USB 2.0, and dual 60-pin headers.

Libre Computer has posted some photos and preliminary specs of a ROC-RK3399 (Renegade Elite) board follow-on to last year’s Indiegogo launched Renegade SBC. The Renegade Elite will launch on Indiegogo in July with general availability due in August. The original Renegade eventually went on to be re-sold by T-Firefly as the Firefly-ROC-RK3328-CC, and a similar future appears to await the Renegade Elite, as the photos show the board imprinted with the Firefly logo.

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It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

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Hardware

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER.

Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open.

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Intel Chaos Looming?

Filed under
Hardware
BSD

Intel Affairs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Congatec teams up with OSADL for real-time Linux

    In a first step, OSADL qualified congatec’s latest real-time Linux implementation that uses Linux kernel 4.9.47-rt37 on conga-TS170 Server-on-Modules equipped with the embedded server-class Intel Xeon processor (E3-1578L v5 at 2.00GHz). The challenge when implementing hard real-time Linux behaviour lies in mastering all processing layers from BIOS to Linux kernel to user space, since the overall real-time capabilities are only as good as the weakest link in the chain. In addition, modern processors such as Intel’s Skylake family offer a wide range of energy saving features that must be balanced to the requirements of real-time computing. Executed in standardized racks, the OSADL quality assurance testifies that conga-TS170 Server-on-Modules are perfect for any real-time application. The boards support all major real-time capable OS from both x86 and ARM technologies. These include first and foremost real-time Linux but also further RTOS such as VxWorks or QNX, as well as deterministic hypervisor and virtualization technologies from vendors such as Real-Time Systems.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS certified for Intel NUC for IoT device development

    The pairing of Ubuntu with Intel® NUC provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market. Once in the field, the Intel® NUC is built to ensure deployment is easily manageable and runs seamlessly with little operational support needed.

  • Intel CEO Brian Krzanich quits biz after fling with coworker rumbled

    Intel chief exec Brian Krzanich has quit after his “past consensual relationship” with an employee came to light.

    Staff flings are frowned upon in US corporate tech world, and against Intel company policy, which bans bosses from having relationships with people who report to them, directly or indirectly.

  • Intel CEO Brian Krzanich Resigns

    While Intel's second quarter revenue and non-GAAP EPS is exceeding their prior guidance, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has resigned effective immediately.

Hyperthreading From Intel Seen as Dodgy, Buggy

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Security
  • Intel Hyper Threading Performance With A Core i7 On Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Following the news yesterday of OpenBSD disabling Intel Hyper Threading by default within its OS over security concerns and plans to disable Simultaneous Multi Threading for other processors/architectures too, here are some fresh Intel HT benchmarks albeit on Ubuntu Linux. The OpenBSD developer involved characterized HT/SMT as "doesn't necessarily have a positive effect on performance; it highly depends on the workload. In all likelihood it will actually slow down most workloads if you have a CPU with more than two cores." So here are some benchmarks using a current-generation Intel Core i7 8700K six-core processor with Hyper Threading.

  • SMT Disabled by Default in -current
  • OpenBSD Will Disable Intel Hyper-Threading To Avoid Spectre-Like Exploits

    OpenBSD, an open source operating system that focuses on security, announced that it will disable Intel’s Hyper-Threading (HT) feature so that attackers can no longer employ Spectre-like cache timing attacks.

  • Intel’s hyperthreading blocked on OpenBSD amid hints of new Spectre-like bugs

    The maintainer of open source Unix-like operating system, OpenBSD, has announced that it will disable hyperthreading on Intel CPUs because of security concerns. It claims that simultaneous multithreading creates a potential new attack vector for Spectre-like exploits, and plans to expand its disabling of multithreading technologies to other chip manufacturers in the near future.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes. openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.