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Hardware

Barix Brings Linux Open Source Programmability To Barionet I/O Device

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Hardware
  • Barix Brings Linux Open Source Programmability To Barionet I/O Device
  • Barix to Introduce Barionet 1000 Universal I/O Device

    At ISE 2017, Barix will introduce the Barionet 1000, the latest member of the company’s universal programmable I/O device family for IP-based control and automation applications. In contrast to other Barionet devices that use the proprietary Barix ABCL programming language, the Barionet 1000 is the first device to be programmable in Linux using the Open WRT framework. It is also the first Barionet device to integrate wireless support and a USB port for emerging control and automation connectivity needs.

How to get up and running with sweet Orange Pi

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Hardware
HowTos

As open source-powered hardware like Arduino and Raspberry Pi becomes more and more mainstream, its cost keeps dropping, which opens the door to new and innovative IoT and STEM applications. As someone who's passionate about both, I'm always on the lookout for new innovations that can be applied in industry, the classroom, and my daughter's robotics team. When I heard about the Orange Pi as being a "Raspberry Pi killer," I paused to take notice.

Despite the sour sounding name, the Orange Pi Zero intrigued me. I recently got my hands on one and in this article share my first impressions. Spoiler alert: I was very impressed.

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More News About KDE Slimbook

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KDE
Hardware
  • Meet the KDE Slimbook, a Powerful Laptop Running KDE Neon

    On the hunt for a powerful new Linux laptop? You might be interested in this, the KDE Slimbbook.

    The KDE Slimbook is a KDE-branded laptop that comes pre-loaded with the Ubuntu-based KDE Neon Linux distribution. The device is not only packed full of the latest and greatest Plasma and KDE apps, but has been tested by KDE developers to ensure that everything runs super-y smooth out of the box, with all hardware support properly configured.

  • New developer features to come with iOS 10.3, KDE Slimbook released, and Node.js certified developer program—SD Times news digest: Jan. 26, 2017
  • KDE Slimbook is a Linux-powered laptop for $780 and up

    The developers of the KDE desktop environment for Linux-based computers have partnered with Spanish PC maker Slimbook to release a laptop that comes with KDE software pre-installed.

    The KDE Slimbook is 13 inch notebook that’s available with up to a Core i7 Skylake processor and which comes wit the KDE Neon operating system.

  • Would you pay $800 for a Linux laptop?

    KDE is one of the bigger Linux projects out there, and today the dev team behind it announced that it would be partnering with Slimbook (a Spanish PC company) to produce the KDE Slimbook, a laptop designed specifically for running KDE Neon.

    The driving idea behind the project was to help alleviate the biggest issue facing Linux distributions: hardware compatibility. Where a company like Apple simply can ensure that its hardware and software work in sync by controlling both of those aspects, and Microsoft’s Windows has hefty licensing fees and requirements to ensure that hardware partners provide proper drivers and support, Linux, by virtue of being an independent and open-source platform, can be far more difficult to get working on different hardware. The usual method for getting Linux on a computer typically involves trawling forums, following how-to guides, and hoping that another member of the community has tried the setup or encountered the issue that you’re working on.

ASUS "Tinker Board"

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Linux
Hardware
Debian
  • Asus takes on Raspberry Pi with 4K-capable Tinker Board

    Tech giant Asus is taking on the Raspberry Pi with its own DIY-friendly single-board computer that's said to offer 4K video playback and 24-bit audio support in exchange for a hefty £55 price tag.

  • ASUS "Tinker Board" Powered By Rockchip ARM SoC, Supports Debian

    Making its rounds this morning as a "Raspberry Pi competitor" is the Tinker Board from ASUS.

    The Tinker Board is ASUS' take on an ARM SBC similar to what's already offered by a plethora of vendors. The Tinker Board features a quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 processor with ARM Mali T764 graphics and there is 2GB of DDR3 memory.

Raspberry Pi, Linux Devices, and LEDE 17.01

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Linux
Hardware
  • Mycroft Available as Raspberry Pi Image

    Mycroft now has a Raspberry Pi image that is ready to run. Developers, makers, hackers and enthusiasts can download the image to their Raspberry Pi and create their own Mycroft enabled projects.

    We have created the Picroft image so the community has access to a quick, easy to install artificial intelligence(AI). Our thinking is that having ready access to an out-of-the-box AI will inspire some crazy cool applications. We’re hoping our community proves us right.

  • New Raspberry Pi Release Targets Industry, IoT

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation on Monday launched its long-awaited industrial strength Compute Module 3. The latest version of the low-cost Raspberry Pi computer, it is designed for more robust manufacturing and technical demand uses than prior versions, which target consumer and basic business needs. The idea behind the new module is to provide a cost-effective way to produce customized products based on the Raspberry Pi 3, noted James Adams, chief operating officer and hardware lead.

  • Blobless Linux on Raspberry Pi (rpi-open-firmware).
  • COM runs Linux on Kaby Lake, supports Intel Optane

    Congatec’s Linux-ready “Conga-TS175” COM Express Basic Type 6 module supports 7th Gen Intel Core E/EQ and Xeon CPUs, Intel Optane SSDs, and up to 32GB DDR4.

    Congatec followed upon its earlier announcement of a Conga-TC175 COM Express Compact Type 6 module with a larger, 125 x 95mm Basic Type 6 module called the Conga-TS175. Both COMs support Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” line of 14nm processors.

  • LEDE 17.01 branched

    this is just a heads-up to inform you that LEDE master has been branched into a new branch "lede-17.01" now.

Hardware With Linux

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale

    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen.

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted.

    That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.

  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here

    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.

  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux

    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.

  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market

    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion.

    Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Raspberry Pi 3

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 Launched

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation this morning announced the Compute Module 3 (CM3) as the successor to their original Compute Module.

    The Raspberry Pi Compute Module remains targeted as a offering for those manufacturing customized products based upon the Raspberry Pi. The Compute Module uses a DDR2 SO-DIMM interface and makes it easy and low-cost to integrate within custom hardware designs.

  • Giveaway: Win a Linux-friendly Raspberry Pi 3 and Eleduino Aluminum Case with Heatsinks!

    If you have been wanting one, I have good news. We here at BetaNews are giving away the best version -- the Raspberry Pi 3. We aren't stopping there, however, as we are also including a very nice aluminum case -- including heatsinks for overclocking. It is the exact Raspberry Pi 3 and case as seen in the video above. In other words, the case has already been installed by yours truly. Want to enter to win? There are multiple ways to enter. Just click the link below!

Can RISC-V - Linux of Microprocessors - Start an Open Hardware Renaissance?

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Linux
Hardware

I share the hope with many people that we will soon have access to modern, capable devices powered by both open hardware AND software. There have been advancements in recent years and more hardware is being opened up, but the microprocessors in our pc's and other devices are stuck running one of the dominant, closed Instruction Set Architectures. RISC-V aims to fix this.

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via DMT/Linux Blog

Blob-less Raspberry Pi Linux Is A Step Closer

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Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has been an astounding success since its launch nearly five years ago, to the extent that as of last autumn it had sold ten million units with no sign of sales abating. It has delivered an extremely affordable and pretty powerful computer into the hands of hobbyists, youngsters, hackers, engineers and thousands of other groups, and its open-source Raspbian operating system has brought a useful Linux environment to places we might once have thought impossible.

The previous paragraph, we have to admit, is almost true. The Pi has sold a lot, it’s really useful and lots of people use it, but is Raspbian open-source? Not strictly. Because the Broadcom silicon that powers the Pi has a significant amount of proprietary tech that the chipmaker has been unwilling to let us peer too closely at, each and every Raspberry Pi operating system has shipped with a precompiled binary blob containing the proprietary Broadcom code, and of course that’s the bit that isn’t open source. It hasn’t been a problem for most Pi users as it’s understood to be part of the trade-off that enabled the board’s creators to bring it to us at an affordable price back in 2012, but for open-source purists it’s been something of a thorn in the side of the little board from Cambridge.

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Hardware With GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Papa's Got a Brand New NAS

    At the beginning of my search, I started down a more traditional route with a cheap 1U server and a modern motherboard, but I quickly started narrowing down the motherboards to small, lower-power solutions given this machine was going to run all day. As I started considering some of the micro ATX solutions out there, it got me thinking: could I use a Raspberry Pi? After all, the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi has a reasonably fast processor, a decent amount of RAM, and it's cheap, so even if one by itself wasn't enough to manage all my services, two or three might do the trick and not only be cheaper than a standard motherboard but lower power as well.

  • Traditional PCs Continue To Decline

    I’m joining the 21st century by switching to GNU/Linux on ARM instead of what the remains of the Wintel monopoly ships. 2017 should be the last year an x86-based PC runs in my home, except for a print-server. I don’t have an ARMed driver for the damned printer, but that printer is getting old. Maybe it will die…

  • Programming the Open-V Open Source CPU on the Web

    You can now program the Open-V on the web, and see the results in real time. The code is compiled in the web IDE and then flashed to a microcontroller which is connected to a live YouTube live stream. It’s pretty neat to flash firmware on a microcontroller thousands of miles away and see the development board blink in response.

  • Linux ready COM taps FPGA/ARM Arria 10 SoC

    Enclustra’s “Mercury+ AA1” COM runs Linux on an Altera Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid with up to 8GB DDR4, up to 8GB eMMC, PCIe Gen 3, and -40 to 85°C support.

    Swiss FPGA specialists Enclustra announced a Mercury+ AA1 computer-on-module built around Intel/Altera’s dual-core, Cortex-A9 Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid SoC. The 74 × 54mm module is open for pre-orders, and is said to be “already in use,” suggesting it has entered the sampling stage.

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UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17! Read more Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?