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Hardware

Open Hardware and GNU/Linux in Devices

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • The TMD-1 is a Turing machine demonstrator

    According to Michael Gardi, although you can find numerous stunning Turing machine implementations on the Internet, their complexity tends to detract from the simplicity of what a Turing machine actually does. In order to easily show how they work, he decided to create a demonstrator with the actual calculations handled by an Arduino Mega.

    The console, dubbed TMD-1, displays a “tape” state on the top of the device using eight servo-controlled flip tiles that write 1s or 0s, while a series of lighted arrows indicate the program’s position. On the bottom surface, users can program instructions with magnetic tiles, and read the current machine state via LEDs.

  • An Introduction to Hardware Hacking
  • Explore the backyard and beyond with this FPV RC vehicle

    If you want to build your own first-person view RC rover for some backyard exploration, this design by “MoreMorris” is a great place to start.

    The tank-esque vehicle features a 3D-printed frame, including print-in-place tracks, and is able to traverse rough terrain as seen in the video below. Meanwhile, a servo-mounted FPV camera on top allows it to look left and right without swinging the body around.

    Inside the vehicle, an Arduino Uno board controls its two motors with the help of an L298N driver module. User interface consists of a Nano-based remote, while communication is handled via a pair of nRF21L01 radio transceivers.

  • Board-Level Solutions Dress for IoT Duty

    The kinds of networking and edge computing required by an IoT implementation can vary extremely from application to application. Especially in harsh environment situations, rugged board-level IoT gateways and edge modules make more sense than office-grade kinds of solutions. Traditional SBC vendors are filling these needs by crafting powerful embedded boards that include wireless connectivity such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

  • Rakwireless Launches WisBlock IoT Modular System Beta Testing Program

    Rakwireless has launched several IoT evaluation boards such as RAK4260 LoRaWAN EVB relying on WisBlock modules comprised of a carrier board and a module. So far, those were always sold as part of evaluation boards, but now the company is trying to expand WisBlock use as a modular system, so users can easily build their custom systems, LEGO style.

  • Silicon Labs Introduces Bluetooth 5.2 BGM220S SiP and BGM220P PCB Module
  • Comet Lake-S systems provide PoE+ and optional PCIe or PCI

    Vecow’s rugged “ECX-2200/2100 Series” embedded computers run Linux or Win 10 on 10th Gen Comet-Lake-S CPUs with up to 64GB DDR4, 2x SATA, 2x or 6x GbE with optional PoE+, 3x M.2, and PCI or PCIe x16 slots.

    Vecow announced six embedded computers that follow its similarly 10th Gen Comet-Lake-S based ECX-2000 Series. The ECX-2200/2100 Series is larger, at 260 x 240 x 79mm, enabling a full-size PCIe x16 or PCI slot, depending on the model. The new series also adds a second DisplayPort, more DIO, and on some models, X-coded M12 connectors for the PoE+ ports.

Graphics and Hardware: AMD, OpenGL/Vulkan, ARM/Nvidia and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • AMDVLK 2020.Q3.5 Vulkan Driver Released With Several Game Fixes

    AMD has kicked off the new week with the release of AMDVLK 2020.Q3.5 as their official open-source Radeon Vulkan driver for Linux systems derived in part from the same sources as their Windows Vulkan driver.

    With AMDVLK 2020.Q3.5 there is updating against the Vulkan 1.2.152 API as well as a change to eliminate an invisible copy of trace buffers on AMD APU platforms. Most interesting though with this routine update are the fixes, to which there are several game fixes.

  • AOMP 11.9 Released For OpenMP Offloading To Radeon GPUs

    AOMP 11.9 was released on Friday as AMD's LLVM-based compiler with Clang for C/C++ and Flang for Fortran in offloading capable OpenMP code to Radeon GPUs.

    AOMP 11.9 is AMD's latest work on their LLVM 11 derived code-base for OpenMP GPU compute until the necessary patches have worked their way eventually back into the upstream code-base.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Draw Parameters

    Let’s talk about ARB_shader_draw_parameters. Specifically, let’s look at gl_BaseVertex.

    In OpenGL, this shader variable’s value depends on the parameters passed to the draw command, and the value is always zero if the command has no base vertex.

    In Vulkan, the value here is only zero if the first vertex is zero.

    The difference here means that for arrayed draws without base vertex parameters, GL always expects zero, and Vulkan expects first vertex.

    Hooray.

  • Nvidia Buys Arm From SoftBank for $40 Billion

    If completed, the transaction would instantly transform Nvidia into one of the most influential players in smartphone technology, a market that had previously eluded it. Arm, which licenses designs that other companies turn into chips, has long defined the computing technology found in most mobile devices. And Arm designs are starting to play a bigger role in cloud data centers.

    But the deal is likely to prompt close scrutiny by antitrust authorities around the world. Influential Arm customers potentially affected by the transaction include Apple, Samsung Electronics, Amazon.com, Qualcomm and Huawei.

  • NVIDIA Announces $40 Billion Deal To Acquire Arm

    The recent rumors panned out and NVIDIA just announced they have reached a definitive deal with SoftBank to acquire Arm.

    NVIDIA is set to acquire Arm in a deal worth $40 billion USD between cash and stock. The deal is expected to take around 18 months to close and NVIDIA has stated their commitment to keeping Arm independent and their brand identity. Additionally, NVIDIA will keep Arm headquartered in the UK and will also expand Arm's presence there with a new AI research center.

  • NVIDIA to Acquire Arm for $40 Billion from Softbank

    A few weeks ago, I read rumors about NVIDIA acquiring Arm, and I thought it was probably just a joke because of the obvious conflicts of interests since NVIDIA would be providing IP to competitors, who may then be wary of starting designs based on Arm NVIDIA cores and GPUs.

  • NVIDIA confirms $40 billion deal to buy Arm

    Huge industry news to mention this morning! NVIDIA has confirmed they're buying Arm for $40 billion. This news comes after speculation over it for some time, which yesterday was finally announced.

    Before getting wild with speculation about what will happen, NVIDIA noted a few keys points about the acquisition. Notably, they will actually keep the headquartered presence in Cambridge, UK and expand the R&D there with "establishing a world-class AI research and education center, and building an Arm/NVIDIA-powered AI supercomputer for groundbreaking research". Additionally, they will be continuing the same open-licensing model that Arm has along with "customer neutrality" and additionally they will be expanding Arm's IP licensing with some of NVIDIA's own tech.

    Nothing is actually complete yet though, as these take time to go through all the proper channels. This includes regulatory approvals across he U.K., China, the European Union and the United States which they're estimating to take 18 months. See the full announcement here.

  • Nvidia will keep ARM licensing “neutral,” wants to license GPU tech, too

    Nvidia has officially announced that it is buying ARM from SoftBank for $40 billion. The deal is one of the biggest tech acquisitions of all time and will see Nvidia control the world's most popular CPU architecture.

    Nvidia's press release oddly paints the deal as primarily about "AI," saying the deal "brings together NVIDIA's leading AI computing platform with ARM's vast ecosystem to create the premier computing company for the age of artificial intelligence." Nvidia apparently sees GPU-accelerated AI as its next big growth sector, and the company currently sells embedded systems for self-driving cars and multi-GPU systems for workstations and servers, offering high-teraflop deep-learning performance. Somehow it thinks ARM will help with this.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 10.0 Milestone 2 Now Available For Testing

    The second development release of the forthcoming Phoronix Test Suite 10.0-Finnsnes is now available for testing.

    Following last month's debut of Phoronix Test Suite 10.0 M1 and the alpha of the new OpenBenchmarking.org, the second development release is now available ahead of the planned Phoronix Test Suite 10.0 release in October.

Chromebooks, ChromeOS, Chrome and GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Hardware
  • Google to Separate Chrome Browser from Chrome OS

    In its initial days, Chrome OS usually got dismissed as a sophisticated web browser due its web-first approach and the lack of app compatibility. Chrome OS has significantly evolved as a platform since then and has reached a position where it can serve as the primary operating system in your PC.

    If you’re using a Chromebook as your main computer, you are likely to see an error message that reads “This device will no longer receive the latest software updates. Please consider upgrading” when it reaches end of life. Since Google Chrome is deeply integrated with Chrome OS, this means that you will not receive updates once your Chromebook gets deprecated.

  • What is LaCrOS for Chromebooks and why does it matter?

    Earlier this year, 9to5 Google caught code changes about something called LaCrOS. Work has progressed on this enough to the point where LaCrOS is available in the Canary Channel of Chrome OS 87, appearing as another Chrome browser icon. That’s because Google is decoupling the Chrome browser from Chrome OS on Chromebooks. And it’s using Linux to do this.

    We know this because of a Google document explaining what LaCrOS is and what it stands for: Linux And ChRome OS. That’s right, the Chrome browser will be independent of Chrome OS and appears to be based on a Linux version of Chrome with improved Wayland support.

  • The rise and fall of NewBlue, Google's attempt to "fix" Bluetooth on Chrome OS

    It is a well-known fact that Google has a rough history with Bluetooth. While the Bluetooth situation on Chromebooks is improving thanks to recent development, many of us who pair Bluetooth peripherals to our Chromebooks like wireless earbuds or mice will know that the wireless experience isn’t perfect. In 2018, with Bluetooth devices on the rise and the launch of the Pixel Slate looming, Google likely felt pressured to tackle this problem. This led to an experiment with a brand new Bluetooth daemon, in an ambitious project known as NewBlue.

    After more than two years of development, NewBlue was enabled by default on all Chromebooks, starting at Chrome OS version 80. The Chromium developers had hoped this would resolve the Bluetooth issues on Google's browser-based OS; but in the end, NewBlue didn’t last long.

  • Four operating systems: One device. How the Chromebook will become the universal laptop.

    Seriously, when was the last time you did any serious work with macOS or Windows without an internet connection? Anytime this decade? The 2010s? Sure, if you're editing video, gaming, or working with an older vertical program, you still need a powerful PC with a standalone operating system. But, for most of us, our work lives and dies with the internet.

    Every corporate program--and I mean every corporate program--has first been moving to a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model. More recently, with Chromebooks leading the way, most major technology companies are moving to a Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) model, where even your desktop resides much more on the cloud than in your office.

Debian Project Leader Jonathan Carter: Wootbook / Tongfang laptop

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

I’ve been reading a bunch of positive reviews about the Tuxedo Pulse 14 and KDE Slimbook 14. Both look like great AMD laptops, supports up to 64GB of RAM and clearly runs Linux well. I also noticed that they look quite similar, and after some quick searches it turns out that these are made by Tongfang and that its model number is PF4NU1F.

I also learned that a local retailer (Wootware) sells them as the Wootbook. I’ve seen one of these before although it was an Intel-based one, but it looked like a nice machine and I was already curious about it back then. After struggling for a while to find a local laptop with a Ryzen CPU and that’s nice and compact and that breaks the 16GB memory barrier, finding this one that jumped all the way to 64GB sealed the deal for me.

Read more

How Emulate an Amiga 1200 on Your Linux PC or Raspberry Pi

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Hardware

In 1989 Tim Burton’s Batman movie was in the cinema, and advertising campaigns were in full swing to promote the Caped Crusader. At Commodore, their marketing team had signed a deal with Warner Brothers Pictures and Batman was to be on the Amiga. The Amiga 500 “Batman Pack” became the iconic pack which saw this humble home computer dominate the market.

But the Amiga 500 was not the first machine in the Amiga range. That honour goes to the Amiga 1000 as used in 1985 by Andy Warhol to digitally alter a photograph of Blondie lead singer Debbie Harry. However, the Amiga 500 was the machine that made the biggest impact on the 16-bit home computing scene. Featuring 512KB of RAM and a 68000 7MHz CPU, the Amiga 500 was much more than a games machine. It was a competent office computer, a music creation tool, an artist’s studio and a television workhorse, capable of mixing live television with graphics created on the Amiga.

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Open Hardware and GNU/Linux on Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Ubuntu: The State of Robotics – August 2020

    So that’s the summer gone (hopefully, that heat was awful). Or winter if that’s where you are. Seasons change and so does the state of robotics. Fortunately, that’s what we’re here for. Before we get into it, as ever, If you’re working on any robotics projects that you’d like us to talk about, be sure to get in touch. Fire an email to robotics.community@canonical.com, we’d love to hear about it and share it with our audience.

  • What the blink is my IP address?
  • Ride the waves at night with this gnarly LED surfboard

    Moritz v. Sivers recently got into river surfing, which unfortunately leaves him with less time for other hobbies, like making electronics projects. The solution, of course, was to create a teched out surfboard.

    His build features an array of WS2812B LEDs embedded into the sides of the board, controlled by an Arduino Nano housed in a Tupperware box strapped to the back.

    The device also includes an MPU-6050 inertial measurement unit, allowing the unit to react to Sivers’ movements through the water. Left and right turns, standing, pumping the board, and surfing straight all have their own animations.

  • [Old] arduino factory + production tour in turin, italy

    system elettronica not only produces arduino’s PCBs but also the control circuits for the machines it uses to do so, which the factory owner makes blue to match arduino boards’ unusual hue. at system elettronica, the first step in the creation of an arduino board is a machine that punches out holes on sheets of copper vetrite, stamping out the spaces that will house the microchip and other electronic components, as well as those that will eventually permit makers to connect all kinds of sensors, screens, and input devices. here in strambino, apruzzese estimates, they punch about 2 million holes each day for their line of arduino production alone.

  • Which PC Boots Up and Shuts Down Faster: AMD or Intel?

    The move to SSDs spurred a wave of UEFI and software optimizations that ultimately reduced boot times by significant amounts, but that doesn’t mean that every processor or platform can deliver the same level of performance during system boot up. There can be big differences between Intel and AMD’s respective chips and platforms (see our AMD vs Intel CPU face-off), so we set out to measure which company is the fastest at system boot up, shutdown, and restarting.

This $10 single-board computer is faster than a Raspberry Pi 3

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Hardware

When the first Raspberry Pi computer launched in 2012, there was nothing quite like it on the market: a $35 single-board computer designed for education, home use, or development projects.

These days cheap mini PCs and development kits are plentiful. But I was still surprised to see the Iconikal Rockchip 3328 single-board computer selling for just $10.

This little PC may not be quite as powerful as a current-gen Raspberry Pi 4 computer, but it’s powered by a chip that outperforms the previous-gen Raspberry Pi 3 in most benchmarks. And unlike most Raspberry Pi devices, the starting price for the Iconikal computer includes accessories including a power supply and microSD card.

Read more

Also: Which PC Boots Up and Shuts Down Faster: AMD or Intel?

Arm Linux version of J-Link debugger lets the Raspberry Pi play host

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Segger has ported its J-Link debugging software to Arm Linux hardware such as the Raspberry Pi for use with its J-Link Debug Probes. The news follows the release of the compatible Eclipse Embedded CDT for Arm and RISC-V.

The Raspberry Pi and other Arm Linux gizmos have long been supported as targets by development platforms such as Eclipse and compatible debuggers such as Segger Microcontroller’s J-Link. Now they can act as the development platform itself.

Segger has released its first debugging software for use with its J-Link hardware debuggers that supports 32-bit and 64-bit Arm Linux platforms including the Raspberry Pi. Aimed primarily at industrial automation projects, the release coincides with the release of the compatible Eclipse Embedded CDT (C/C++ Development Tools) for Arm and RISC-V (see farther below).

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Devices With GNU/Linux Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Scala Launches New Entry-Level and Enterprise Media Players

    Scala Media Player-R is an affordable, entry-level single output media player running on Linux, designed for HD content.
    Scala Media Player-R Plus, also running on Linux, has double the memory and storage of the standard version and is capable of 4K video playback.

  • SEGGER Introduces New Version of J-Link, Adds Support for Raspberry PI

    SEGGER introduced a new version of the company’s J-Link software specifically for Linux Arm. This software version targets applications that operate with Raspberry Pi and other single board computing (SBC) platforms. It further targets these devices and the full feature set established with Windows, macOS, and Linux x86 versions.

  • Apollo Lake system certified for LTE and WiFi

    Lanner’s Linux-ready, Apollo Lake based “LEC-7242” computer ships with 64GB, 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, DP and HDMI, and M.2 and mini-PCIe with SIMs. The system is CE, FCC, and PTCRB certified for WiFi and LTE.

  • Coffee Lake signage system offers triple HDMI 2.0 and M.2

    Nexcom’s “NDiS B560” embedded signage PC runs Linux or Win 10 on 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs and offers triple 4K displays via HDMI 2.0 plus 2x GbE, 6x USB 3.0, and 3x M.2 with 5G support.

    Nexcom announced a Coffee Lake-based embedded system aimed at signage applications. The NDiS B560 runs Linux or Win 10 on a choice of 8th Coffee Lake or 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh chips with Intel UHD Graphics 630 and Intel Q370 or H310 chipsets. Other recent Nexcom Coffee Lake systems include its PCIe x16 enabled AIEdge-X 300 and its Google Edge TPU equipped VTC 7251-GCIoT transportation computer.

  • Apollo Lake Pico-ITX board features four USB 3.0 ports

    Axiomtek’s Apollo Lake based, 100 x 72mm “PICO317” SBC packs in 4x USB 3.0 ports, including a pair of Type-C ports, plus SATA, GbE, HDMI, LVDS, mini-PCIe, and -40 to 70°C support.

    The PICO317 is the latest of a series of Axiomtek Pico-ITX boards with an Intel Apollo Lake processor, including the PICO-319 from 2019 and PICO316 from 2018. Like the PICO319, the PICO317 incorporates the quad-core, up to 1.8GHz Atom x5-E3940 instead of the PICO316’s choice of a Pentium or Celeron. This enables a wider temperature range of -40 to 70°C.

  • PICO317 Fanless Atom x5-E3940 Pico-ITX SBC Powers Industrial IoT Applications
  • PicoRio Linux RISC-V SBC is an open source alternative to the Raspberry Pi

    I’m 100% ready for fully top-to-bottom open source hardware, whether it’s Power9/Power10 at the high end, or RISV-V at the low end. ARM is a step backwards in this regard compared to x86, and while I doubt RISC-V or Power will magically displace either of those two, the surge in interest in ARM for more general purpose computing at least opens the door just a tiny little bit.

  • RIOS Laboratory and Imagination announce partnership to grow the RISC-V ecosystem

    Imagination Technologies and RIOS Laboratory have established a partnership, with Imagination opening up select GPU IP to the RISC-V International Open Source Laboratory (RIOS Lab).

Students step in to refurbish computers as school needs rise

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

A middle school IT club has found a way to use their skills to revamp old computers at a time when distance learning has made such technology indispensable.

Penguin Corps is a Linux club at the charter school Aspen Academy in Savage. Linux clubs provide a space for students to learn how to install and use open-source software. The students are using that knowledge to refurbish old computers for their classmates.

With the school opting for hybrid learning, the need for computers skyrocketed.

“These kids very enthusiastically caught the open-source bug and took on the challenge of wanting to help their fellow students,” said Stu Keroff, a social studies teacher who directs the club.

Read more

Also: How to Speed Up Your Old Mac and Give It a New Life [Ed: Suggests GNU/Linux further down this article]

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Linux Magazine Celebrates 20 Years

    With Issue 240, Linux Magazine is celebrating its 20th year of print publication. Given the transformations that have taken place in Linux, open source, and in publishing during the past 20 years, this is a remarkable achievement. Reflecting on these changes, Linux Magazine editor-in-chief Joe Casad said, “I’m struck by how much Linux has changed since I started this job—and how much the publishing industry has itself remained in a perpetual state of reinvention. It is one thing when the subject of the magazine is continually transforming—and quite another when the very context in which you operate is a moving target.” [...] Linux Magazine has weathered the various industry shifts with consistency of vision and a small, dedicated workforce. Casad credits the internationally distributed team of professionals, “who stay calm under pressure and show up every day with ideas and good energy,” with much of the magazine’s long-running success.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (firefox, libproxy, mbedtls, samba, and zeromq), openSUSE (chromium and virtualbox), Red Hat (firefox and kernel), SUSE (cifs-utils, conmon, fuse-overlayfs, libcontainers-common, podman, libcdio, python-pip, samba, and wavpack), and Ubuntu (rdflib). 

  • LibreOffice Documentation Team Status

    While this progress in shortened documentation development time is fairly good, it can be substantially improved by having more contributors on the team. It would be terrific if all contributors were a skilled technical writers, but in reality anyone with a reasonable command of the English language and an eye for detail can make a valuable contribution. No contributor is expected to rewrite entire guide books, although some of our most experienced, long term contributors do exactly that. In fact nothing is expected or demanded of any contributor, other than to let other members of the team know what they what they have chosen to work on. In some cases that might be to update a chapter of an existing guide, or reviewing the work of another team member. Reviewing can take the form of proof reading, or researching the accuracy of the guide information in relation to the software’s actual operation. By identifying yourself as a Docs Team contributor does not mean you are making any permanent or long term commitment, many contributors come and go over long periods according to the demands of their “real” life.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Firefox Reality 12

    The latest version of Firefox Reality for standalone VR headsets brings a host of long-awaited features we're excited to reveal, as well as improved stability and performance. [...] Look for Firefox Reality 12 available now in the HTC, Pico and Oculus stores. This feature-packed release of Firefox Reality will be the last major feature release for a while as we gear up for a deeper investment in Hubs. But not to worry! Firefox Reality will still be well supported and maintained on your favorite standalone VR platform.

  • Daniel Stenberg: everything curl five years

    At the time of that blog post, the book was already at 13,000 words and 115 written subsections. I still had that naive hope that I would have it nearly “complete” by the summer of 2016. Always the optimist. Today, the book is at over 72,000 words with content in 600 subsections – with just 21 subtitles noted “TBD” to signal that there’s still content to add there. The PDF version of it now clocks in at over 400 pages. I’ve come to realize and accept that it will never be “complete” and that we will just keep on working on it indefinitely since curl itself keeps changing and we keep improving and expanding texts in the book.

  • Amazon announces 'Luna', their own take on cloud game streaming

    Amazon Luna will give you access to certain Channels of games which you subscribe to. The first two announced are Amazon's own Luna+ to get access to a "growing" library and Ubisoft are also confirmed to have their own subscription channel coming to it too. The Luna+ subscription will have 100s of games from big names too like Resident Evil 7, Control, The Surge 2, A Plague Tale: Innocence and a great many more. By the time it launches, it's going to have quite a full library already.

  • How to Install Discord on Ubuntu & Linux Mint (GUI & CLI)
  • Granulate Applies AI to Linux Server Optimization

    Granulate today announced that a platform that leverages machine learning algorithms to optimize Linux server environments running on-premises or in the cloud is now generally available. [...] According to the company, more than 40,000 instances of gAgent have already been deployed by IT teams at PicsArt, Perion, AppsFlyer and Coralogix.

Programming Leftovers

  • In a world where up is down, it's heartwarming to know Internet Explorer still tops list of web dev pain points

    Web developers resent having to deal with Microsoft Internet Explorer and Apple Safari, which they cite among their top three pain points, alongside layout and styling inconsistencies among browsers. This finding comes from the Mozilla Developer Network's 2020 Browser Compatibility Report [PDF], a survey of web development concerns culled from 1,429 responses out of 3,236 – the remainder having been tossed for invalid or missing data. The purpose of the report is to alert the browser vendors to problems so they can be addressed.

  • chemfp's chemistry toolkit I/O API

    This is part of a series of essays about working with SD files at the record and simple text level. In the last two essays I showed examples of using chemfp to process SDF records and to read two record data items. In this essay I'll introduce chemfp's chemistry toolkit I/O API, which I developed to have a consistent way to handle structure input and output when working with the OEChem, RDKit, and Open Babel toolkits.

  • 10 Things We Picked Up From Code Reviewing

    Ever wondered what you could learn from a code review?

  • Mike Driscoll: CodingNomads Tech Talk Series!

    Recently CodingNomads invited me on their Tech Talk series. CodingNomads does online code camps for Python and Java. The Tech Talks are a series of videos that teach or talk about tech. In my case, I got to talk about my favorite programming language, Python!

  • Arm Begins Bringing Up Neoverse N2, Neoverse V1 Support In The GNU Toolchain

    It was just a few days ago that Arm outlined the Neoverse N2 "Perseus" design as a follow-on to the Neoverse N1 and coming concurrently to the next-generation Cortex-A. Now the company has already jumped on beginning their open-source/Linux enablement work around the Neoverse N2. There haven't been any Neoverse N2 additions yet to LLVM/Clang or GCC as the most interesting aspects where it would reveal any new instruction set extensions / capabilities not yet formally announced by Arm (there also isn't any patches out under review on that front either), but a patch out this morning adds Neoverse N2 support to the GNU Assembler (Gas).

  • autoconf-2.69c released [beta]
    We are pleased to announce beta release 2.69c of GNU Autoconf.
    
    This release includes two months of bug fixes since the previous beta,
    2.68b, and eight years of development work since the previous full
    release, 2.69.  See below for the list of significant changes since
    the previous beta.  See the NEWS file for a complete list of
    significant changes since 2.69.
    
    We tentatively plan to make the final release of Autoconf 2.70 at the
    end of October 2020.  Please test this beta with your autoconf
    scripts, and report any problems you find to the Savannah bug tracker:
    
       https://savannah.gnu.org/support/?func=additem&group=autoconf
    
    Please also send general comments and feedback to <autoconf@gnu.org>.
    
    Please also spread this announcement widely, so that as many Autoconf
    users as possible hear about it.
    
    Here are the compressed sources:
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz   (2.0MB)
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.xz   (1.3MB)
    
    Here are the GPG detached signatures[*]:
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz.sig
      https://alpha.gnu.org/gnu/autoconf/autoconf-2.69c.tar.xz.sig
    
    Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth:
      https://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html
    
    [*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the
    .sig suffix) is intact.  First, be sure to download both the .sig file
    and the corresponding tarball.  Then, run a command like this:
    
      gpg --verify autoconf-2.69c.tar.gz.sig
    
    If that command fails because you don't have the required public key,
    then run this command to import it:
    
      gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 384F8E68AC65B0D5
    
    and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command.
    
    This release was bootstrapped with the following tools:
      Automake 1.16.2
    
    Noteworthy changes and bug fixes since the previous beta (2.69b):
    
    * A performance regression in AC_PROG_CXX has been corrected.
      See https://savannah.gnu.org/support/index.php?110285 for details.
    
    * AC_PROG_YACC has been reverted to using ‘bison -y’.  After 2.70,
      we will instead add an AC_PROG_BISON macro for programs that
      require Bison extensions.
      See https://savannah.gnu.org/support/index.php?110266 for details.
    
    * AC_PROG_LEX no longer looks for a library providing the function
      ‘yywrap’.  LEXLIB will only be set to ‘-lfl’ or ‘-ll’ if a
      scanner that defines both ‘main’ and ‘yywrap’ itself still needs
      something else from that library.
    
      Packages should define yywrap themselves, or use %noyywrap.
    
    * When ‘$CC -E’ doesn’t run the C preprocessor, AC_PROG_CPP now looks
      in $PATH for ‘cpp’ before falling back to ‘/lib/cpp’.
    
    * AC_TYPE_PID_T now gives pid_t the correct definition on 64-bit
      native Microsoft Windows.
    
    * AC_INIT now trims extra white space from its arguments.  For instance,
    
        AC_INIT([  GNU  Hello  ], [1.0])
    
      will set PACKAGE_NAME to “GNU Hello”.
    
    * autoreconf will now run gtkdocize and intltoolize when appropriate.
    
    * autoreconf now avoids complaints from subsidiary tools about
      unknown warning categories.  For example, ‘autoreconf -Wcross’
      will no longer cause complaints from (current released versions of)
      aclocal and automake.
    
    * Generated configure scripts no longer fail catastrophically when
      stdin, stdout, or stderr is closed on startup.
    
    * Many bugs related to building Autoconf itself have been corrected.
      These mostly affected non-GNU operating systems and situations where
      optional tools are not available.
    
    * The obsolete macros AC_DIAGNOSE, AC_FATAL, AC_WARNING, and
      _AC_COMPUTE_INT are now replaced with modern equivalents by
      autoupdate.
    
    * The macro AC_OBSOLETE is obsolete.  Autoupdate will replace it with
      m4_warn([obsolete], [explanation]).  If possible, macros using
      AC_OBSOLETE should be converted to use AU_DEFUN or AU_ALIAS instead,
      which enables autoupdate to replace them, but this has to be done by
      hand and is not always possible.
    
    * AC_FC_LINE_LENGTH now documents the maximum portable length of
      "unlimited" Fortran source code lines to be 250 columns, not 254.
    
    * Warnings about obsolete constructs are now on by default.
      They can be turned off with '-Wno-obsolete'.
    
    * autoconf will now issue warnings (in the ‘syntax’ category) if the
      input file is missing a call to AC_INIT and/or AC_OUTPUT.
    
    * AC_INIT will now issue warnings (in the “syntax” category) for a
      non-literal URL argument, and for a TARNAME argument which is either
      non-literal or contains characters that should not be used in file
      names (e.g. ‘*’).
    

JDK 16: What’s coming in Java 16

Although not due to arrive until March 2021, Java Development Kit (JDK) 16 has begun to take shape, with proposed features including concurrent thread-stack processing for garbage collection, support for C++ 14 language features, and an “elastic metaspace” capability to more quickly return unused class metadata memory to the OS. JDK 16 will be the reference implementation of the version of standard Java set to follow JDK 15, which arrived September 15. The six-month release cadence for standard Java would have JDK 16 arriving next March. Read more