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ARM Takes Down Its Website That Attacked Open-Source Rival

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Hardware

ARM, the incredibly successful developer of CPU designs, appears to be getting a little nervous about an open-source rival that’s gaining traction. At the end of June, ARM launched a website outlining why it’s better than its competitor’s offerings and it quickly blew up in its face. Realising the site was a bad look, ARM has now taken it down.

For the uninitiated, ARM Holdings designs various architectures and cores that it licenses to major chipmakers around the world. Its tech can be found in over 100 billion chips manufactured by huge names like Apple and Nvidia as well as many other lesser-known players in the low-power market. If ARM is Windows, you can think of RISC-V as an early Linux. Like ARM, it’s an architecture based on reduced instruction set computing (RISC), but it’s free to use and open to anyone to contribute or modify. While ARM has been around since 1991, RISC-V just got started in 2010 but it’s gaining a lot of ground and ARM’s pitiful website could easily be seen as a legitimising moment for the tech.

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Fedora on the UDOO Neo

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Red Hat
Hardware
HowTos

The core support for the i.MX6SX SoC and the UDOO Neo is pretty reasonable, with the MMC fixes it’s been very stable, all the core bits are working as expected, included wired and wireless network, thermal, cpufreq, crypto and it looks like the display should work fine. There’s a few quirks that I need to investigate further which should provide for a fun evening or weekend hacking. There has also been recently merged support for the i.MX6SX Cortex-M4 land upstream in Zephyr upstream for the 1.13 release, so getting that running and communication using Open-AMP between Fedora and Zephyr should also be an interesting addition. I think this will be a welcome addition to Fedora 29, and not a moment too soon!!

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Open Hardware: RISC-V FUD and DIY Guns

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Hardware
  • ARM Takes Down Boneheaded Website Attacking Open-Source Rival

    ARM, the incredibly successful developer of CPU designs, appears to be getting a little nervous about an open-source rival that’s gaining traction. At the end of June, ARM launched a website outlining why it’s better than its competitor’s offerings and it quickly blew up in its face. Realizing the site was a bad look, ARM has now taken it down.

    For the uninitiated, ARM Holdings designs various architectures and cores that it licenses to major chipmakers around the world. Its tech can be found in over 100 billion chips manufactured by huge names like Apple and Nvidia as well as many other lesser-known players in the low-power market. If ARM is Windows, you can think of RISC-V as an early Linux. Like ARM, it’s an architecture based on reduced instruction set computing (RISC), but it’s free to use and open to anyone to contribute or modify. While ARM has been around since 1991, RISC-V just got started in 2010 but it’s gaining a lot of ground and ARM’s pitiful website could easily be seen as a legitimizing moment for the tech.

  • A Landmark Legal Shift Opens Pandora’s Box for DIY Guns

     

    Two months ago, the Department of Justice quietly offered Wilson a settlement to end a lawsuit he and a group of co-plaintiffs have pursued since 2015 against the United States government. Wilson and his team of lawyers focused their legal argument on a free speech claim: They pointed out that by forbidding Wilson from posting his 3-D-printable data, the State Department was not only violating his right to bear arms but his right to freely share information. By blurring the line between a gun and a digital file, Wilson had also successfully blurred the lines between the Second Amendment and the First.

     

    "If code is speech, the constitutional contradictions are evident," Wilson explained to WIRED when he first launched the lawsuit in 2015. "So what if this code is a gun?”

Linux module and dev board showcase Arm/FPGA Stratix 10 SX

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Linux
Hardware

Reflex CES has launched a “COMXpressSX Stratix 10” Basic Type 7 module that runs Linux on Intel’s Stratix 10 SX SoC and offers 56GB DDR4, 32GB eMMC, and 32x PCIe. An optional PCIe carrier supplies 10GbE, GbE, SATA, and more.

Paris-based Reflex CES, which sells a variety on FPGA-based PCIe boards and development kits, last year released a Linux-driven, 95 x 86mm Arria 10 SoC SoM based on Intel PSG’s FPGA- and dual Cortex-A9 enabled Arria 10 SoC. Now it has returned with a COM Express Basic Type 7 module and development kit that runs Linux on Intel PSG’s more powerful, 14nm fabricated Stratix 10 SX SoC. The COMXpressSX Stratix 10 supports high performance computing & analytics, acceleration, intelligent vision, and video processing applications.

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Also: Intel Core based EPIC SBC targets retail applications

ARM Launches "Facts" Campaign Against RISC-V

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Hardware

It looks like Arm Limited is going on the offensive against the RISC-V open-source processor instruction set architecture.

ARM has launched RISCV-Basics.com as a site to "understanding the facts" about the RISC-V architecture.

Their five points they try to make before designing a SoC is that the ISA accounts for only a small portion of the total investment to creating a commercial processor, RISC-V doesn't yet have an a large developer ecosystem, there is the risk of fragmentation with this open-source ISA, RISC-V is new and thus not yet as mature in terms of being a proven architecture around security, and greater design costs with RISC-V due to potential re-validation if modifying the ISA.

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Dell's GNU/Linux Offerings

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Precision Developer Editions 7530/7730 now online — Welcome the power pair

    These new thinner, lighter, premium-built Precision mobile workstations come preloaded with Ubuntu and have been RHEL certified. The 7530 and 7730 feature the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, blazing-fast memory and professional graphics.

    Of particular note is the increased core count and memory. In fact the maximum memory has doubled to 128GB which helps with cloud developer local workloads. In the case of the 7730, it supports up to 8TB of PCIe NVME storage, the most PCIe storage on the market today. The 7730 is also the first AI/ML ready mobile workstation available.

  • Dell Launches World's Most Powerful 15" and 17" Laptops Powered by Ubuntu Linux

    The Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstation Developer Editions are now available to order from Dell's online store with the Ubuntu Linux operating system pre-installed.

    At the end of May 2018, Dell's Project Sputnik leader George Barton announced the availability of four new Dell Precision Mobile Workstations running the open-source and free Ubuntu Linux operating system.

    While at the moment of the announcement only the Dell Precision 3530 was available to order, those interested in purchasing a powerful laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed can now order two other models, namely the Dell Precision 7530 and Dell Precision 7730.

  • Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed launched

    Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstation Developer Editions are now open for order worldwide via the company’s online store. Both machines get powered by the open-source and free Ubuntu Linux operating system.

    Interested users who want a powerful machine with Ubuntu pre-installed, can now order the Dell Precision 7530 and Dell Precision 7730. Under the hood, both machines run the latest Intel Core or Xeon processors. The processor is further coupled with high-speed RAM, top-end NVidia or AMD graphics cards, and come pre-installed with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system.

    Dell also plans to release professional drivers in the near future that’ll include features not offered by standard Inbox drivers of NVidia and AMD GPUs.

Hacker Boards

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware
  • Renegade Elite Mini PC Board Counters Raspberry Pi 3 With 4K Streaming And Hexa-Core CPU

    A new device called the Renegade Elite (ROC-RK3399-PC) has surfaced as a competitor to the Raspberry Pi 3 that is packing in much higher specifications and can stream 4K video. The Renegade Elite is made by Libre Computer and will soon surface for pre-order on Indiegogo.

  • Raspberry Pi's 'app store' lands with new Raspbian OS update

    The latest version of Raspbian, the Raspberry Pi's official OS, introduces a new set-up wizard to help beginners easily get over the first few hurdles after buying one of the $35 developer boards.

    The new version of Raspbian also introduces an equivalent of the App Store that recommends software that users can choose to install, alongside apps already bundled with Raspbian.

Raspbian wizard and app store toss a lifeline to newbies

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Debian

Raspbian has been updated with a a setup wizard and an app store. Meanwhile, Alpine Linux 3.8.0 adds RPi 3 B+ support, BusyBox 1.29 improves router support, and SUSE (as in Linux) was sold to EQT.

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has updated the leading Linux distribution for the Raspberry Pi, which may also be the most popular embedded Linux distro. The update to the Debian-based Raspbian adds a setup wizard and a catalog of free apps, among other features. Other Linux software news in recent days includes new Alpine Linux and BusyBox releases, and the sale of SUSE to EQT (see farther below).

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SiFive To Release Code As Open-Source For Fully Initializing The RISC-V Board

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Hardware
OSS

Last week we noted how some of the code to boot the RISC-V SiFive HiFive Unleashed development board was closed-source. That upset some in the Coreboot community with hoping for a more open development board built around the RISC-V open-source processor ISA. The good news is that SiFive will soon be releasing the necessary code for initialization as open-source.

The code for initializing the DDR controller was not open-source and SiFive believed they could not open-source it. The good news is that SiFive has discovered they will be able to open-source it.

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Pi-lovers? There are two new OSes for you to bite

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Owners of dimunitive Raspberry Pi computers rejoice! Alpine has emitted version 3.8.0 of its super light Linux distribution, with some special attention given to the latest iteration of the hardware.

While it has been possible to get Alpine on the Pi for some time – Raspberry Pi 2 owners have been able to get it working since version 3.2.0 – this is the first version to add support for the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ and also offer an arm64 (aarch64) image to ease deployment.

The Pi 3 Model B+ packs a surprising amount of power into a small package, rocking a 64 bit 1.4GHz processor and gigabit ethernet (over USB 2.0). The 1GB RAM (unchanged from the previous Model Cool should give the slimline Alpine incarnation of Linux more than enough headroom, depending what else you decide to run.

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More in Tux Machines

RISC-V and NVIDIA

  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator
    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.