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Hardware

Raspberry Pi KMS Driver Pull Request Sent For Linux 4.4

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This Broadcom VC4 DRM/KMS driver has been in the works for a while now with the main hardware target being the Raspberry Pi / Raspberry Pi 2. The Broadcom architectures officially supported by this driver are the bcm2835 and bcm2836. While Eric has also been working on a VC4 Gallium3D driver, this VC4 KMS driver being offered up for Linux 4.4 lacks the kernel bits for hardware acceleration as well as power management. There's other out-of-tree code for that, but it's not ready for mainline with Linux 4.4. Thus with Linux 4.4 on the Pi, you'll just get a nice kernel mode-set powered display with a display plane and cursor.

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Displaylink adds Linux support for USB monitors

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

A few weeks ago at IDF, Displaylink released drivers for USB monitors on Linux. This has been something SemiAccurate has been asking them about since, well it has been years now.

The idea is simple, transfer video data over USB rather than a dedicated video port. This requires a bit of compression, CPU load, and of course their proprietary hardware on the monitor side. That isn’t a big deal, the chips are fairly inexpensive and since you are buying a USB monitor or dock, it comes with the device out of the box. On the plus side it means your monitor will work everywhere, or at least it will now.

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Also: Intel Compute Shaders Appear Nearly Ready For Mainline Mesa

EPIC SBC, Chip PC, and Kobo firmware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi Screen

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The Eagerly Awaited Raspberry Pi Display

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

In the end we chose an industrial-quality display from our friends at Inelco Hunter based in the UK, who were able to create something very special:

RGB 800×480 display @60fps

24-bit colour

FT5406 10 point capacitive touchscreen

70 degree viewing angle

Metal-backed display with mounting holes for the Pi

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OSVR in the News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source VR from Razer readies for commercial launch, gains more dev support

    Back in January Razer lifted the lid on its highly customizable "Hacker Dev Kit" VR headset and OSVR (Open-Source Virtual Reality) platform, both designed "to set an open standard for virtual reality input devices."

    Now the company has revealed that the consumer version of its headset, the HDK v1.3, will be available for pre-order on October 1, and that its OSVR content discovery platform has launched and can be accessed right away.

  • OSVR's open-source VR headset is slowly taking shape

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) headset will get a significant upgrade soon. Gaming peripheral company Razer announced the OSVR program back in January, but the first prototype headset was an underwhelming affair with uncomfortable ergonomics and a so-so display. That wasn't really the point, though. Rather than a single company aiming to dominate the VR market, OSVR is a loose band of hardware and software companies hoping to do for virtual reality "what Android did for mobile."

  • OSVR releasing upgraded VR headset development kit in October
  • The Open Source Virtual Reality movement takes a big jump forward

    As the Virtual Reality gaming market grows, there are some growing efforts that are seeking to be less proprietary, and more inclusive about the process. Open Source Virtual Reality, or OSVR, is a movement that involves not just Razer, but over 230 companies that support the cause.

Open Source GPU now out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe

An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event.

The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW.

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Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

Intel aims “5×5″ at gap between NUC and Mini-ITX

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

el showed off a 147 x 140mm “5×5″ SBC form-factor slotted between NUC and Mini-ITX, designed for socketable, LGA-based Intel Celeron and Core processors.

Spurred on by the success of its reference design for 102 x 102mm (4.0 x 4.0-inch) NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini-PCs, many of which run Linux, Intel showed off a “5×5″ mainboard form-factor at last week’s Intel Developer Forum. Billed as being the “smallest socketed board standard,” 5×5 measures 147 x 140mm (5.79 x 5.51 inches), or 29 percent less than the 170 x 170 (6.7 x 6.7-inch) Mini-ITX.

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Logic Supply Announces Fanless, Intel Atom-Based Internet of Things Gateway

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Hardware

The Logic Supply hardware company, known for selling all sorts of industrial and embedded computers powered by GNU/Linux operating systems like Ubuntu, announced the general availability of a fanless Internet of Things (IoT) gateway.

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More in Tux Machines

Nvidia 361.45.11 Graphics Driver Released for Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris Systems

Today, May 24, 2016, Nvidia released a new long-lived graphics drivers for Unix users, version 361.45.11, available now for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems. Read more Also: New NVIDIA 361 Linux Driver Released

Android Leftovers

NVIDIA vs. AMD OpenGL & Vulkan Benchmarks With Valve's Dota 2

Yesterday marked the public availability of Dota 2 with a Vulkan renderer after Valve had been showing it off for months. This is the second commercial Linux game (after The Talos Principle) to sport a Vulkan renderer and thus we were quite excited to see how this Dota 2 Vulkan DLC is performing for both NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards. Here are our initial Dota 2 benchmarks with Vulkan as well as OpenGL for reference when using the latest Linux graphics drivers on Ubuntu. Read more

Why Hyperledger wants to be the ‘Linux of blockchain’

Blockchain technology offers many different benefits to enterprise developers — but there’s no cross-industry open standard for how to develop it. That makes it difficult for vendors and CIO customers to place their bets and begin building it into their technology architecture. Hyperledger, a Linux Foundation project to produce a standard open-source blockchain, wants to solve that problem, and it just got an executive director, Brian Behlendorf, to help it on its way. He founded the Apache Software Foundation, was previously on the board of the Mozilla Foundation and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and managed tech VC firm Mithril Capital Management. Read more