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Hardware

Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi Zero W: Now Available via Humble Bundle!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

My new book is now shipping! And it's being launched via a terrific Humble Bundle of books on electronics, making, Raspberry Pi and Arduino.

Humble Bundles, if you haven't encountered them before, let you pay what you want for a bundle of books on related subjects. The books are available in ePub, Mobi, and PDF formats, without DRM, so you can read them on your choice of device. If you pay above a certain amount, they add additional books. My book is available if you pay $15 or more.

You can also designate some of the money you pay for charity. In this case the charity is Maker Ed, a crowdfunding initiative that supports Maker programs primarily targeted toward kids in schools. (I don't know any more about them than that; check out their website for more information.)

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Devices: Fairphone, Amino, Nordija, Purism

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
  • End of Support for Fairphone 1: Some Unanswered Questions

    I previously followed the goings-on at Fairphone a lot more closely than I have done recently, so after having mentioned the obsolescence risks of the first model in an earlier article, it was interesting to discover a Fairphone blog post explaining why the company will no longer support the Fairphone 1. Some of the reasons given are understandable: they went to market with an existing design, focusing instead on minimising the use of conflict minerals; as a result various parts are no longer manufactured or available; the manufacturer they used even stopped producing phones altogether!

    A mention of batteries is made in the article, and in community reaction to the announcement, a lot of concern has been expressed about how long the batteries will be good for, whether any kind of replacements might be found, and so on. With today’s bewildering proliferation of batteries of different shapes and sizes, often sealed into devices for guaranteed obsolescence, we are surely storing up a great deal of trouble for the future in this realm. But that is a topic for another time.

  • Amino and Nordija move between Android and Linux

    Amino and Nordija are to showcase a new dual mode platform that enables operators to seamlessly move between Android and Linux-based TV delivery.

    It’s designed to provide a consistent state-of-the-art user experience.

  • Purism and KDE to Work Together on World's First Truly Free Smartphone

Linux Hardware: Asustor, Advantech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Devices: Purism’s Librem 5, ASUSTOR, and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux: Jim Zemlin's Hypocrisy, Open Source Summit 2017 Roundup, AMD Graphics and CPU Failures/Bugs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Devices: Congatec, Aaeon, Anavi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux-ready module features Atom C3000 and 4x 10GbE ports

    Congatec’s “Conga-B7AC” is a Linux-friendly Type 7 COM with up to a 16-core Atom C3000, and support for 4x 10GbE, 32x PCIe, and industrial temperatures.

    Congatec delivered one of the first COM Express 3.0 Type 7 modules with its Conga-B7XD, based on Intel 5th Gen “Broadwell” Xeon D and Pentium processors. Now it has introduced the Conga-B7AC Type 7 module with the same 125 x 95mm dimensions, 10GbE support, Linux support, and an up to 16-core Intel Server-class SoC, but with a more power efficient Atom C3000 “Denverton” SoC. There’s also a Conga-X7/EVAL carrier board (see farther below)

  • COM Express modules build on Kaby Lake and Xeon E3

    Aaeon announced a “NanoCOM-KBU” COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Intel 7th Gen U-Series chips and a “COM-KBHB6” Type 6 Basic module with a Xeon E3.

  • pHAT adds IR to the Raspberry Pi

    Anavi has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a new run of its $16 “Anavi Infrared pHAT,” which adds IR remote control to the Pi, and offers optional sensors.

Devices: Canonical’s 'IoT' Ambitions, SensiEdge’s SensiBLE

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Meeting IoT challenges

    Founded 15 years ago, Canonical has been responsible for delivering the open source Ubuntu platform. “We work to ensure that Ubuntu is certified and can be used on PCs, servers and across cloud infrastructure,” Bell explains.

    “The rise of the IoT brings with it data and opportunities to monetise that data and one thing we can be sure about is that unpredicted methods of monetisation are sure to emerge.”

    Canonical’s approach to the IoT encourages the adoption of a single operating system and, crucially, one that can be upgradable over the air.

  • Tiny Bluetooth LE dev boards target IoT apps

    Two Cortex-M4 Bluetooth LE boards have gained wider distribution: Arrow is selling SensiEdge’s SensiBLE, and Mouser has Adafruit’s Feather Nrf52 Bluefruit.

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) continues to rise in importance as the wireless conduit for MCU-based IoT edge devices. Late last week Arrow Electronics announced it was launching the recently introduced SensiBLE IoT SoM, which is also referred to as the Simba-Pro, from Israel-based SensiEdge. (Mouser has already begun distributing the product, as has RS Components in the UK.)

Mobile Devices: Purism 5 Linux Phone, New in Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vorke V2 Plus Mini PC – Ubuntu PC with Impressive Features

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

The Vorke V2 Mini PC is the latest to hit the market to compete with other mini PCs in the mini arena.

If you are looking for a mini PC that can get the job done, then take a look at the Vorke V2 Plus PC. This mini PC packs a lot of premium components into an ultra-portable housing that can fix right in the palm of your hand.
The Vorke V2 Plus has support for stunning 4K resolution thanks to the onboard Intel HD 620 graphics which deliver 1.5x better pixel production over the previous model. You can even tuck Vorke securely behind any monitor or TV that supports a VESA bracket.

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Also: Ubuntu devs look at making apt index files smaller

Laptops That Ship Pre-installed With Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

​In the past, to get Linux on your laptop, you needed to get a laptop that shipped with Windows and then install your Linux distro on top of them. This usually means two main issues. The first being that you paid about $100 extra for Windows and then also, support in terms of drivers for the laptop were up in the air as your hardware may be supported fully, partially or not at all. But these days things are changing. There are many laptops that ship with Linux preinstalled. Meaning you get better hardware support and then save some bucks off for not paying for Windows. THANK YOU! So what are your options if you wanted a laptop with Linux preinstalled? Read along.

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