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Hardware

AMD's HSA Run-Time Library Is Now Open-Source

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Hardware
OSS

Last week we reported on AMD's plans for a complete user-space open-source HSA stack. Today they have finally delivered!

The last remaining component,. the HSA run-time library was open-sourced this afternoon on GitHub. This HSA library goes with the AMD GPU LLVM back-end to form a complete user-space open-source driver stack for HSA applications using kernels written using OpenCL C99. This code goes along with AMD's new "AMDKFD" kernel HSA driver that's still in the process of being mainlined. The AMDKFD driver could potentially appear in the Linux 3.19 kernel but probably won't be merged before Linux 3.20 if going through the DRM subsystem pull.

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Gizmosphere focuses on graphics in open-source computer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Open-source computers have so far lacked good graphics, but Gizmosphere’s new Gizmo 2 is an exception.

The Gizmo 2 is an uncased single-board computer that will sell for US$199. The computer can be used to build robots, electronics with large screens, or interactive computer systems that can recognize gestures or images.

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Handy Disk Image Tools

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

Disk images are computer files of a disk volume or an entire data storage device, such as a hard drive, optical disk (e.g. DVD, CD, Blu-ray), tape drive, USB flash drive, or floppy disk. A disk image represents the content exactly as it is on the original storage device, including both data and structure information.

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Make Your Own Wireless Printer With A Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Wireless technology is perhaps the best improvement to home printing for years. Fewer cables, flexibility about where you can put your printer – it’s win-win. Unless you have an older printer.

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Still running 32 bit Ubuntu?

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Hardware
Ubuntu

I’m considering a proposal to have 16.04 LTS be the last release of Ubuntu with 32 bit images to run on 32 bit only machines (on x86 aka Intel/AMD only – this has no bearing on ARM). You would still be able to run 32 bit applications on 64 bit Ubuntu.

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New open hardware: Raspberry Pi B+

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

The main differences between the B+ and the Raspberry Pi model B are the new model has:

four USB ports (versus two in the model B )
a microSD card (versus a full size SD card in model B )
a video jack integrated with the audio jack (versus two separate jacks in the model B )
GPIO pins extended to 40 pins (versus 26 pins in the model B )
lower power consumption
four mounting holes
What has not changed:

The price, it is $35 USD
The amount of RAM, it has 512 Mb

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AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Announced over the summer when AMD was celebrating their 30 years of graphics celebration was the Radeon R9 285, a $250 graphics card built on the company's latest GCN graphics processor technology to replace the Radeon R9 280. We finally have our hands on a Radeon R9 285 "Tonga" for delivering the first look at its Linux performance.

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Nouveau-PerfKit Still Being Worked On, Perf Counter Code Expected For Linux 3.20

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samuel Pitoiset has been working hard to reverse-engineer NVIDIA's hardware performance counters of their GPU and to allow them to be taken to their full potential under the open-source Nouveau Linux graphics driver.

For over one year the student developer Samuel Pitoiset has tasked himself with reverse engineering NVIDIA's GPU performance counters with an end goal of coming up with an NVPerfKit-like implementation for Linux that runs off the reverse-engineered Nouveau stack. Samuel has been involved with Google's Summer of Code and has stuck around doing great work for the limited-staffed Nouveau driver.

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USB Sees Many Changes For Linux 3.18 Kernel

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Linux
Hardware
Security

Greg Kroah-Hartman sent in pull requests on Tuesday for the various kernel subsystems he maintains. The USB changes as he put it are "lots of little changes in here, all over the place", per his mailing list post.

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Actions have consequences (or: why I'm not fixing Intel's bugs any more)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Recently, as part of the anti-women #GamerGate campaign[2], a set of awful humans convinced Intel to terminate an advertising campaign because the site hosting the campaign had dared to suggest that the sexism present throughout the gaming industry might be a problem. Despite being awful humans, it is absolutely their right to request that a company choose to spend its money in a different way. And despite it being a dreadful decision, Intel is obviously entitled to spend their money as they wish. But I'm also free to spend my unpaid spare time as I wish, and I no longer wish to spend it doing unpaid work to enable an abhorrently-behaving company to sell more hardware. I won't be working on any Intel-specific bugs. I won't be reverse engineering any Intel-based features[3]. If the backlight on your laptop with an Intel GPU doesn't work, the number of fucks I'll be giving will fail to register on even the most sensitive measuring device.

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More in Tux Machines

Head 2 Head: Android OS vs. Chrome OS

A large part of Google’s OS success hasn’t been because of its awesomeness. No. Frankly, we think nothing speaks louder than the almighty dollar in this world. But both are “free,” right? So this is tie? Not really. Although Android is technically free since Google doesn’t charge device makers for it, there are costs associated with getting devices “certified.” Oh, yeah, and then there’s Apple and Microsoft, both of which get healthy payouts from device makers through patent lawsuits. Microsoft reportedly makes far more from Android sales than Windows Phone sales. You just generally don’t see the price because it’s abstracted by carriers. Chrome OS, on the other hand, actually is pretty much free. A top-ofthe-line Chromebook is $280, while a top-of-the-line Android phone full retail is usually $600. We’re giving this one to Chrome OS because if it’s generally cheaper for the builder, it’s cheaper for you. Read more

Kodi (XBMC Media Center) 14.2 Officially Released, Kodi 15 “Isengard” Is On Its Way

The Kodi development team, through Nathan Betzen, had the pleasure of announcing today, March 28, the immediate availability for download of the second and last maintenance release for Kodi 14 (codename Helix), before they continue with the development cycle for the upcoming release, Kodi 15, dubbed Isengard. Read more

Debian 8 Jessie Installer Now Supports Running a 64-bit Linux Kernel on a 32-bit EFI

The Debian Installer team had the pleasure of announcing on March 27 that the second Release Candidate (RC) version of the Debian 8.0 "Jessie" installer is now available for download and testing. The RC2 version of the installer brings a great number of improvements and fixes. Read more

First Look at GNOME 3.16

The highly anticipated GNOME 3.16 desktop environment for Linux kernel-based operating systems has been announced on March 26, 2015, and has been declared by the GNOME development team as the best GNOME release yet. Of course, we wanted to give GNOME 3.16 desktop environment a try and see for ourselves the new features, apps, and improvements. Read more