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Hardware

Devices Getting Smaller (With Linux)

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Hardware
  • Raspberry Picademy USA Accepting Applications

    Are you an enthusiastic individual that is interested in using the Raspberry Pi in the classroom and in community education programs? Then get ready to fill out your application for Raspberry Picademy USA! This will be the first time ever that the Raspberry Pi Foundation will be offering a Picademy in the United States. If you haven’t ever heard of Picademy, or have and are looking to participate, then I’ll answer some basic questions for you on the ins and outs of Raspberry Picademy USA.

  • Wintel Is Sick

    There isn’t any end in sight. As ARM and particularly ARM on mobile devices grows Wintel is being squeezed out of personal IT. Long ago, I and many others cut out That Other OS. Now many millions, billions even, are cutting out Intel. Both heads of the Wintel monopoly are diversifying as fast as they can and cutting prices or moving “profit centers” to avoid being trapped under the weight of their own handiwork. The world just doesn’t need either any longer but it does take a few years to switch over so much installed base of IT. It’s a process, not an event, just like sickness. It remains to be seen whether this is a mortal wounding or just an injury both can survive. I expect that both will survive but both will be cut down to size and only get a normal share of the pie instead of the whole thing.

  • Opportunities And Challenges That The Internet Of Things Creates

    Internet of Things is targeting not only devices, but also sensors. It’s incredible how they can be attached everywhere and record necessary data. For example, wearables are collecting data about fitness habits of their owners and this helps to update the devices with more attention paid to the functionality in high demand. Or, for example, network-connected sensors are used to inform farmers about the pregnancy and sickness of animals. Just imagine if your coffee cup could know how hot you want your coffee to be and how much sugar or milk you add. Collected data would allow businesses to get more specific information on how their products are used, how they break down and what is expected from them in the future.

Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

Liberal Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • Google, HP, Oracle Join RISC-V

    RISC-V is on the march as an open source alternative to ARM and Mips. Fifteen sponsors, including a handful of high tech giants, are queuing up to be the first members of its new trade group which will host next week its third workshop for the processor core.

    RISC V is the latest evolution of the original RISC core developed more than 25 years ago by Berkeley’s David Patterson and Stanford’s John Hennessey. In August 2014, Patterson and colleagues launched an open source effort around the core as an enabler for a new class of processors and SoCs with small teams and volumes that can’t afford licensed cores or get the attention of their vendors.

  • An Open Source Reference Architecture For Real-Time Stock Prediction

    While this post does not cover the details of stock analysis, it does propose a way to solve the hard problem of real-time data analysis at scale, using open source tools in a highly scalable and extensible reference architecture. The architecture below is focused on financial trading, but it also applies to real-time use cases across virtually every industry. More information on the architecture covered in this article is also available online via The Linux Foundation, Slideshare, YouTube, and Pivotal Open Source Hub, where the components in this architecture can be downloaded.

  • Open-Source Tessellation Lands For Pre-Broadwell Intel Hardware

    Back on Christmas was news of patches for implementing tessellation shader support for Intel Ivy Bridge and Haswell graphics hardware after support had already landed for Broadwell and newer within the Mesa driver. Support for those older generations is now present in Mesa.

    As of this afternoon, Kenneth Graunke's work for implementing GL_ARB_tessellation_shader support for Ivy Bridge and Haswell is now within Mesa Git master. This makes tessellation support implemented for all hardware capable of doing so -- Sandy Bridge and older are not.

10 more Raspberry Pi projects primed for IT

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Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi was created as an educational platform but has become one of the most popular embedded systems platforms on earth with a full copy of Linux and a rabid community of DIY-minded developers. That combination alone makes the Raspberry Pi a natural fit for hacking together enterprise IT applications and devices. Add in its low cost and the ready availability of open source solutions, and you can quickly see how previously expensive systems and devices are suddenly within reach of IT departments willing to experiment with Raspberry Pi, as my first foray into DIY IT Raspberry Pi projects showed.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

How The Two Most Popular Laptops On Amazon Run With Ubuntu Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

At the time of writing, the most popular laptop on Amazon.com in the US is the Toshiba Satellite C55-C5241 followed by the ASUS F555LA-AB31. If you are in the market for a new, sub-$500 laptop this holiday season, here are my findings when testing both of these popular laptops under Ubuntu Linux.

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Android phone and tablet dev kits tap new Snapdragon 820

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Android
Linux
Hardware

Intrinsyc has launched three Android 6.0 dev kits — phone, tablet, and board — for Qualcomm’s 14nm Snapdragon 820, with four Cortex-A72-like cores.

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Logic Supply Simplifies the Process of Buying Industrial PCs and Rugged Hardware

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Hardware

Logic Supply, a hardware company known for selling all sorts of embedded and industrial PCs powered by Linux kernel-based operating systems, informs us about the general availability of a new tool that lets users find the best industrial computer for their needs.

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Coreboot and SeaBIOS

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Hardware
OSS
  • More, Older Intel Motherboards Get Added To Coreboot

    First up, "Little Plains" is now supported by Coreboot. As explained by the commit from Intel's Marcin Wojciechowski, "This adds a new mainboard: Little Plains for Intel's atom c2000. It was based on Mohon Peak board with some minor changes. This board is not available as standalone product. It is a managment board for Intel Ethernet Multi-host Controller FM10000 Series"

  • SeaBIOS 1.9 Brings Many Additions

    SeaBIOS 1.9 has been out since last month as the latest version of this open-source implementation of a 16-bit x86 BIOS widely used by Coreboot, QEMU, and other projects.

NVIDIA JTX1: Finally An Exciting 64-bit ARM Board!

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Linux
Hardware

NVIDIA's embargo has just expired on the Jetson TX1: a 64-bit ARM development board that's worth getting excited about for Linux enthusiasts, those wishing to build their own ARM-powered devices, or just wanting a powerful ARM Linux desktop. The Jetson TX1 powered by the Tegra X1 is shaping up to be a splendid device; NVIDIA is even comparing the performance of the JTX1 to that of an Intel Core i7 6700K in certain tasks.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta Adds NVDIMM Support, Improves Security

Today, August 25, 2016, Red Hat announced that version 7.3 of its powerful Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system is now in development, and a Beta build is available for download and testing. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 Beta brings lots of improvements and innovations, support for new hardware devices, and improves the overall security of the Linux kernel-based operating system used by some of the biggest enterprises and organizations around the globe. Among some of the major new features implemented in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 release, we can mention important networking improvements, and support for Non-Volatile Dual In-line Memory Modules (NVDIMMs). Read more Also: CentOS 6 Linux OS Receives Important Kernel Security Update from Red Hat Release of Red Hat Virtualization 4 Offers New Functionality for Workloads

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.