Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Raspberry Pi News: Smart Kitchen, Best Raspberry Pi Distros, and Adding Alexa to a Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Small but Powerful: Automating the Smart Kitchen with the Raspberry Pi

    Ever since the first credit-card sized model was released in 2012, the Raspberry Pi line of sub-$100 Linux devices has defied all expectations. Its owners have chained the devices together to construct powerful supercomputers and used single devices to drive home automation and security systems. The Raspberry Pi is also a great way to inexpensively automate a smart kitchen, and there are easy-to-follow DIY recipes for doing so online.

    First-generation Raspberry Pi devices were nowhere near as powerful and flexible as today’s models. The first generation had no Wi-Fi capabilities, minimal memory and a mid-range CPU. Fast-forward to today, though, and Raspberry Pi devices are as powerful and capable as many personal computers, but available at a fraction of the cost. Their low cost is partly due to the fact that these devices run free and open source Linux distributions instead of expensive, proprietary operating systems.

  • 5 of the best Raspberry Pi distros in 2017 [Ed: recently-updated old article]

    Believe it or not, the Raspberry Pi is now five years old. In its relatively short life the Pi has ushered in a new revolution in computing that stretches far beyond its original remit which was to promote basic computer science education in schools.

  • How to Add Alexa to a Raspberry Pi (Or Any Linux Device)

2017 hacker board survey: Raspberry Pi still rules, but x86 SBCs make gains

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The results are in: The Raspberry Pi 3 is the most desired maker SBC by a 4-to-1 margin. In other trends: x86 SBCs and Linux/Arduino hybrids get a boost.

More than ever, it’s a Raspberry Pi world, and other Linux hacker boards are just living in it. Our 2017 hacker board survey gives the Raspberry Pi 3 a total of 2,583 votes — four times the number of the second-ranked board, the Raspberry Pi Zero W.

Our total of 1,705 survey respondents is just shy of the 1,721 voters in the 2015 survey and about four times more than in our 2016 survey. Our voters — 27 of whom won community-backed Linux and Android single board computers as prizes — selected their favorite community-backed single board computers that run Linux or Android from a catalog of 98 open-spec SBCs. Only 23 of the 98 boards received at least 100 votes (by Borda ranking).

Read more

Also: Btrfs for the Pi

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, Cars, and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi just majorly extended its reach for young coders

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s set of miniature computers, which have become a mainstay for budding coders and indie developers alike, have found themselves everywhere from classrooms to the upper atmosphere. Now, a merger with a coding club network could see the chips land with thousands more children across the world.

    Raspberry Pi is to merge with CoderDojo, a Dublin-based network of programming clubs. There are apparently 1,250 volunteer-led CoderDojos across 69 countries, which are thought to reach 35,000 coders between the ages of seven and 17.

  • [Older] These are the most exciting Linux powered devices

    What started off as a hobby project for the Finnish engineer Linus Torvalds, has turned into a global phenomenon. Today Linux is literally powering the modern economy – everything from Amazon public clouds, stock exchanges, and social networks run on Linux. It also runs in devices like sensors, printers, routers…and what not. Linux virtually owns the smartphone market with Android.

    Here is a sneak peek at some of the most interesting devices powered by Linux.

  • Moving from melzi to ramps

    I have been very happy with my printer except for one thing my printer uses a melzi board. The only issue is there is only one firmware for melzi. This makes testing firmwares in AtCore more difficult since I can’t test on a real machine. In order to do that I need to move to a RAMPS kit. This will allow me to flash just about any firmware that I want. I will keep the details to a minimum for this post would be really long otherwise.

  • Compact, rugged, low power box-PC targets transportation apps

'Open Source' 3D Printer and Open Source Digital Cinema

Filed under
Hardware
  • ATMIA 2017 on 3D printing and Open Source

    During a talk at ATM&Cash Innovation 2017, taking place at the Lancaster Hotel, London on 14th June, Achim Boers, Head of Corporate Innovation at Prosegur, pointed towards 3D printing and open-sourcing when asked about his view on the biggest game-changers in the industry.

  • M3D Stays Low-Cost, Goes Industrial with Open-Source, Feature-Packed Promega 3D Printer

    M3D will always be known for the M3D Micro, the 3D printer that catapulted them to success with a multimillion-dollar Kickstarter campaign in 2014. The Micro was followed up with the Pro and the Micro+, released just recently, which continued the company’s mission of delivering affordable, low-cost, compact consumer 3D printers. Now M3D is introducing another 3D printer – but it’s quite different than anything they’ve produced so far as they step away from consumer orientation for the first time.

  • M3D launches the Promega, its first industrial open source 3D printer

    Having previously focused its products on the entry-level consumer 3D printing market, M3D has now introduced their first-ever industrial 3D printer – the Promega.

  • M3D Raised Millions On Kickstarter. Now Its Founder Is Launching His Own Crowdfunding Site
  • Open Source Digital Cinema

    Years in the making, Apertus has released 25 beta developer kits for AXIOM–their open source digital cinema camera. This isn’t your point-and-shoot digital camera. The original proof of concept from 2013 had a Zynq processor (a Zedboard), a super 35 4K image sensor, and a Nikon F-Mount.

    The device today is modular with several options. For example, there is an HDMI output module, but DisplayPort, 4K HDMI, and USB 3.0 options are in development. You can see several sample videos taken with the device, below.

Wall mountable, Linux-friendly industrial PCs have Mini-ITX guts

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Aaeon announced a series of compact, low profile industrial PCs built around Mini-ITX cores, including a fanless model with a quad-core 2GHz Atom J1900 processor.

Aaeon’s ACS-1U01 series of compact, low profile industrial PCs are designed to house the company’s Mini-ITX single board computers “along with other module components,” says the company. Aaeon is targeting the systems at applications including industrial control, automation, medical equipment, and transportation. The systems have customizable casing and front/rear panels, and can be VESA-mounted.

Read more

The System76 Galago Pro is a fierce featherweight competitor

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

For most people running Linux on a laptop, chances are they had to go through the ritual of wiping Windows and installing the Linux OS. It’s a time-honored tradition in the Linux world, but things are slowly changing, with Linux now coming preinstalled on some very nice portables. Case in point: the ultralight System76 Galago Pro, a laptop that pleasantly surprised me more than once.

Read more

Also: Is Linux faster than Windows ?

Raspberry Pi With Open Port 22

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security

Linux and Android Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

3 off-the-shelf Linux computers compared

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

While the options for Linux computers from commercial vendors are still needles in the proverbial haystack of OEM Windows equipment out there, there are more and more options available to a consumer who wants a good, solid device that's ready-to-use with no messing around.

Still, there are more Linux OEM computers than I could look at for one article—and the options tend to be different in Europe than they are in the United States, with providers like Entroware that don't ship to the latter at all.

In this article, I look at offerings from three of the most well-known Linux OEMs on the western side of the pond: ZaReason, System76, and Dell.

Read more

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • EPIC SBC supports Kaby Lake or Skylake

    Aaeon’s “EPIC-KBS7” SBC supports 6th or 7th gen Intel Core CPUs, and offers wide-range power, 2x GBE ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and SATA, HDMI, and mini-PCIe.

  • 2018 Toyota Camry to feature Linux-based infotainment system in the US
  • Catalog of 98 open-spec, hacker friendly SBCs

    Our 2017 hacker board survey is now live. To earn a chance to win a free SBC, participate in our 3-minute survey of these 98 sub-$200 hacker-friendly SBCs.

    Over the last year, LinuxGizmos has reported on dozens of new community backed, open spec, hacker- and developer-friendly single board computers that run Linux and Android. We’ve added these to a curated list of earlier boards to publish a catalog of 98 SBCs. The boards included in our survey must be priced under $200 (not counting shipping), have a promised shipment availability by July, and meet our relatively flexible selection criteria for open source compliance (see farther below).

  • SBCs

    Highlights for me include Odroid-C2 which does make a nice PC client and is very suitable for hacking into some project like the Raspberry Pi and the like. It’s one drawback is that it’s still not supported completely by Linux. It needs some magical bits to boot. Then there’s FireFly RK3399 which comes close to what I want for a server except RAM is limited to 4GB and SATA requires use of USB or M.2 PCIe. Other better boards are too expensive to make the list. The doubly priced Marvell Community Board is an example.

  • Choose Your Favorite Linux Hacker SBCs and Enter to Win a Free Board
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Server: NASA, Kubernetes at GitHub, and Docker in Mainframes

  • NASA Launches Supercomputer Servers into Space
    During that time, it will run a series of supercomputing benchmarks, including High Performance Linpack, the High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) suite, and the NASA-derived NAS parallel benchmarks. Its operation will be compared to HPE servers of the same construction back on Earth. The idea is to make sure that the ISS-based system is able to deal with the realities of cosmic radiation, solar flares, unstable electrical power, and wide variations in temperature.
  • Kubernetes at GitHub
    Over the last year, GitHub has gradually evolved the infrastructure that runs the Ruby on Rails application responsible for github.com and api.github.com. We reached a big milestone recently: all web and API requests are served by containers running in Kubernetes clusters deployed on our metal cloud. Moving a critical application to Kubernetes was a fun challenge, and we’re excited to share some of what we’ve learned with you today.
  • Docker Can Now Containerize Legacy Apps Running on Mainframes
    Docker this week announced the first update to its rebranded flagship platform with the release of Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 17.06. Back in March, Docker rolled out the first Docker EE, built on the backs of what had been known as Docker Commercially Supported and Docker Datacenter. The new release comes on the heels of a report last week from Bloomberg that the container company has been raising money, which will result in $75 million dollars being added to its coffers by the end of the month, bringing with it a new valuation of $1.3 billion — up $300 million from its previous valuation.

Linux Foundation's Dronecode, Ethereum Blockchain, and Kernel Changes

today's howtos

Games: Out of Reach, Darkwood and F1 2017