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Hardware

The Eagerly Awaited Raspberry Pi Display

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

In the end we chose an industrial-quality display from our friends at Inelco Hunter based in the UK, who were able to create something very special:

RGB 800×480 display @60fps

24-bit colour

FT5406 10 point capacitive touchscreen

70 degree viewing angle

Metal-backed display with mounting holes for the Pi

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OSVR in the News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source VR from Razer readies for commercial launch, gains more dev support

    Back in January Razer lifted the lid on its highly customizable "Hacker Dev Kit" VR headset and OSVR (Open-Source Virtual Reality) platform, both designed "to set an open standard for virtual reality input devices."

    Now the company has revealed that the consumer version of its headset, the HDK v1.3, will be available for pre-order on October 1, and that its OSVR content discovery platform has launched and can be accessed right away.

  • OSVR's open-source VR headset is slowly taking shape

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) headset will get a significant upgrade soon. Gaming peripheral company Razer announced the OSVR program back in January, but the first prototype headset was an underwhelming affair with uncomfortable ergonomics and a so-so display. That wasn't really the point, though. Rather than a single company aiming to dominate the VR market, OSVR is a loose band of hardware and software companies hoping to do for virtual reality "what Android did for mobile."

  • OSVR releasing upgraded VR headset development kit in October
  • The Open Source Virtual Reality movement takes a big jump forward

    As the Virtual Reality gaming market grows, there are some growing efforts that are seeking to be less proprietary, and more inclusive about the process. Open Source Virtual Reality, or OSVR, is a movement that involves not just Razer, but over 230 companies that support the cause.

Open Source GPU now out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe

An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event.

The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW.

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Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

Intel aims “5×5″ at gap between NUC and Mini-ITX

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

el showed off a 147 x 140mm “5×5″ SBC form-factor slotted between NUC and Mini-ITX, designed for socketable, LGA-based Intel Celeron and Core processors.

Spurred on by the success of its reference design for 102 x 102mm (4.0 x 4.0-inch) NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini-PCs, many of which run Linux, Intel showed off a “5×5″ mainboard form-factor at last week’s Intel Developer Forum. Billed as being the “smallest socketed board standard,” 5×5 measures 147 x 140mm (5.79 x 5.51 inches), or 29 percent less than the 170 x 170 (6.7 x 6.7-inch) Mini-ITX.

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Logic Supply Announces Fanless, Intel Atom-Based Internet of Things Gateway

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Hardware

The Logic Supply hardware company, known for selling all sorts of industrial and embedded computers powered by GNU/Linux operating systems like Ubuntu, announced the general availability of a fanless Internet of Things (IoT) gateway.

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Now your Raspberry Pi can water your lawn

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Lawn watering systems are notorious for sending money down the drain. When Robert Booth was looking to get started on a robotics project, it's no surprise that a sprinkler system was at the top of his list. Booth will be presenting his "Strawberry Pi" system at Texas Linux Fest this year. We talked to him about it.

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Also: RaspBSD (FreeBSD-Based Raspberry Pi OS) Has Been Released

Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware

Logic Supply's New Thin Client Computers to Offer Fanless Virtualization Solutions

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Logic Supply, a hardware company known for being on the leading edge of technology with embedded and industrial computers powered by Linux kernel-based operating systems, such as Ubuntu, has announced that it now offers a full line of ACP (Agile Certified Practitioner) certified thin client computers compatible with ThinManager.

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Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Local companies use open-source hardware

    You probably know the Linux penguin, that cud­dly mascot of open-source software, but do you know the mascot of open-source hardware?

  • Why open hardware is winning

    While recently demonstrating a prototype to a family member I was asked, "Are you going to patent that?" While happy to see such enthusiasm, I tactfully declared that I couldn’t seek a patent, as it was built using open source components. This perplexed my family member who, being from a generation or two (or three) before me, thought that is how "inventing things works." So, I did my best to explain the seemingly "hippie-ish" concepts of open source, copyleft, and Creative Commons licenses to someone from America’s Greatest Generation with little success.

    In the end, we simply agreed to disagree on the issues of patents and capitalist pursuit.

  • Open Source Digital Walkie Talkie Development Board (video)

    Makers, developers and hobbyists that are looking to build different communication systems may be interested in a tiny open source digital walkie-talkie development board that is being launched several Kickstarter crowdfunding website.

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More in Tux Machines

How Google Does Open Source

Marc Merlin has been working as an engineer at Google since 2002 and has seen (and done) a lot of open source and Linux work during that time. Speaking at the LinuxCon North America event this week, Merlin provided a standing room only audience with an overview how Google uses and contributes to open source. "Google wouldn't be around today without open source software," Merlin said. Read more

High-end music player has a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian inside

Bryston has launched a high-end, compact “BDP-π” digital music player built on a Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, plus a HifiBerry “Digi+” audio HAT add-on. Bryston’s new Raspberry Pi-based BDP-π digital music player costs a hefty $1,295. Yet that’s less than half the cost of the highly acclaimed Bryston BDP-2 player, while offering many of these same features and much of the same high-end sound quality. The BDP-π is faster and more capable than the BDP-1, says the company. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming (Mighty No. 9 and Wine)

  • “Mighty No. 9” Mac & Linux Versions Released on Steam
    The creators of the Kickstarter-funded video game, Mighty No. 9, announced on Thursday they released the Mac and Linux versions of the game. This announcement comes just a little over two months after the game was delivered to North American and Asian backers via PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The team revealed that both Mac and Linux versions are now available on Steam.
  • Mac and Linux Versions of Mighty No. 9 Released
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.4 Is Now Available
    The Wine team released today fifth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.4 has many small changes including 50 bugfixes. This stable release contains bugfixes, new cards were added to GPU description table, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

Android Leftovers

  • iPhones are much more likely to 'fail' than Androids
    Apple's once glittering reputation for quality took quite a few hits during the last few years, especially when it comes to iOS, the software that runs on iPhones. In some cases, recurrent software bugs have plagued users with issues such as the inability to use Wi-Fi, frequent crashes, and ridiculously short battery life. This week reports surfaced about a hardware flaw that makes some iPhone 6 screens inoperable. (Apple hasn't confirmed any related problems.) It's hard to tell how widespread some of these issues are, but a new report from a company that monitors smartphone quality suggests iPhones are far more likely to "fail" or suffer serious glitches than Android phones. The Blancco Technology Group says it collected performance data from millions of mobile phones during the second quarter of 2016, and it found that iPhones had an overall failure rate of 58 percent, compared to just 35 percent failure for Android devices. The term "failure" doesn’t necessarily mean that the phone has become a brick, according to Blancco. Instead, it means the device or software running on the device suffered some serious problem.
  • Maru OS is now open source (Turns Android phones into Linux desktops)
    Maru OS is a software project that lets you plug an Android phone into an external display to run desktop Linux software. First unveiled earlier this year, the software is very much a work-in-progress. Initially it only supported one phone: the Google Nexus 5. But things could get a lot more interesting soon, because the developer behind Maru OS has finished open sourcing the project and a group of developers are planning to start porting the software to run on additional devices.
  • Maru OS wants to turn your phone into a desktop with its latest open source build
    Not to be confused with Maru the adorable YouTube cat, Maru OS, the bite-sized Android add-on that turns your phone into a desktop, just went open source. Maru OS doesn’t change much about the way your phone operates on its own, but once you connect a desktop monitor via a slimport cable, Maru really comes to life. When connected to a display, Maru OS allows you to run a desktop Linux environment straight from your phone. Your phone is still a phone, it’ll take calls, send texts and do everything else it normally does, even while it’s connected to a desktop monitor running Linux on the side. It’s an interesting concept, but it’s still very much a work in progress. Today’s announcement could help move things along for Maru.