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Hardware

More Dell Laptops With GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Welcome the new Dell Precision developer editions!

    Today I’m proud to announce the new the Linux-based Dell Precision Mobile workstation line: the 3530, 5530, 7530 and the 7730. These systems, which represent the fourth generation of the Precision developer editions, come preloaded with Ubuntu and have been RHEL certified.

    These new thinner, lighter, premium-built Precision mobile workstations feature the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, blazing-fast memory and professional graphics.

  • Dell Launches New Precision Mobile Workstation Line-Up Powered by Ubuntu Linux

    Dell has launched a new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation line-up powered by the Ubuntu Linux operating system, featuting thinner and lighter designs with premium builds and using the latest technologies.

    Targeted mostly at developers, the new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation "Developer Edition" line-up consists of the Dell Precision 3530 Mobile Workstation, Dell Precision 5530 Mobile Workstation, Dell Precision 7530 Mobile Workstation, and Dell Precision 7730 Mobile Workstation, which come with a much lighter and thinner design, and offer a premium build.

  • Dell Unveils New Ubuntu Laptops

    Thinner, lighter and more powerful — three ways to describe the latest Ubuntu powered laptops from Dell.

    Everyone’s favourite Linux laptop vendor has lifted the veil on a fresh set of Linux-powered laptops.

    Their all-new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation ‘developer editions’ combine the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, memory options and discrete graphics with the steady and stable Ubuntu operating system.

Devices: Ibase, OpenWatch, Purism

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OS
Linux
Hardware
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC supports industrial temperatures

    Ibase’s Linux-compatible, 3.5-inch “IB818” SBC provides a dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake SoC, plus 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x SATA, 2x mini-PCIe, triple display support, wide-range power, and -40 to 85°C support.

  • AsteroidOS and OpenWatch offer open alternatives to smartwatch stacks

    The open source, Linux based “AsteroidOS” alternative to Wear OS arrives in a stable 1.0 release, and Block spins off some of its Android smartwatch stack as an open source OpenWatch Project.

    The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches.

  • Purism Publishes Librem 5 Dev Kit Details, Small Batch Order Going In Soon

    Purism has published their nearly final specifications on their limited-run Librem 5 Dev Kit. The cutoff for ordering a developer kit is next week as they are placing their hardware order and planning on only this single, limited run of the developer kit prior to the phones becoming available next year.

    Their deadline for ordering a developer kit is the end of the month and the kit price has raised to $399 USD. In the process, Purism believes they are still on track for their January 2019 for coming up with having the phone's actual hardware ready.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

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Hardware

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1.

Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, Klashwerks, Volvo/AGL/IVI

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi gets in touch with touch panels

    The Raspberry Pi 3 and RPi 3 Compute Module are quickly expanding into the industrial touch-panel market. Here’s a guide to six RPi-based contenders.

    In the smart home, voice agents are increasingly replacing the smartphone touchscreen interface as the primary human-machine interface (HMI). Yet, in noisier industrial and retail IoT environments, touchscreens are usually the only choice. The industrial touch-panel computer market has been in full swing for over a decade. Touch-panel systems based on Linux, and to a lesser extent, Android, are gaining share from those that use the still widely used Windows Embedded, and over the past year, several Raspberry Pi based systems have reached market. Here we look at six RPi-based touch-panels.

  • Gesture controlled dashcam and telematics computer has dual HD cameras

    Klashwerks has launched a $299, gesture controlled “Raven” dashcam, security system, navigation tool, and OBD-II telematics reporting device, which runs Android on a Snapdragon 650 and offers front- and cabin-facing HD cameras.

    Klashwerks’ Android-based Raven dashcam and automotive computer was a hit on Indiegogo and won a CES Innovation Award. Now it’s available publicly for $299.

  • Volvo runs with Android for Intel IVI, Linux will dominate

    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system on chip (SoC) to run In Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chip makers in this fast-growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving OS scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant.

Devices: AsteroidOS, Android and More

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Linux
Hardware
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Released, Net Neutrality Update, Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Beta Now Available and More

    AsteroidOS 1.0 is now available. Released yesterday, the open-source operating system for smartwatches is finally available after four years in the works. As posted on the AsteroidOS website, "AsteroidOS is built on standard Linux technologies including OpenEmbedded, opkg, Wayland, Qt5, systemd, BlueZ, and PulseAudio. This makes it the ideal platform to build any sort of wearable project you can imagine. Do you want to run Docker on your watch? AsteroidOS can do it. Do you want to run Quake on your watch? AsteroidOS can do that too. The sky is really the limit! Our community welcomes anyone interested in playing with a smartwatch project."

  • Meet AsteroidOS – A potential replacement for Wear OS
  • Logic Supply embedded PCs now available with pre-loaded AWS Greengrass

    Logic Supply is now offering pre-loaded AWS Greengrass software for autonomous edge processing linked to the AWS IoT platform on two of its Linux-based systems: its recent Apollo Lake based CL200 mini-PC and its Kaby Lake enabled MC850 embedded PC.

    Logic Supply announced it has joined Amazon Web Services’ AWS Partner Network (APN), and is certified to offer the Linux-driven AWS Greengrass software for localized edge computing. The first two certified systems are the recent Intel Apollo Lake based CL200 Edge Device mini-PC and last year’s high-end MC850 embedded computer running Kaby Lake or Skylake CPUs.

  • New Cherry Trail Pico-ITX SBC also available in 7- and 10-inch touch-panels

    Estone Technology (AKA Habey) has launched a Linux-friendly “EMB-2610” Pico-ITX SBC built on an Atom x5-Z8350 with WiFi, BT, and optional PoE, and also introduced 7- and 10-inch touch-panel PCs built on it.

    Over the last decade, Toledo, Ohio based Estone Technology has sold products under either the Estone or Habey label. It’s now integrating the operations and websites under the Estone brand. The product page for the new EMB-2610 Pico-ITX SBC, for example, points to a Habey EMB-2610 datasheet. The EMB-2610 also powers new 7-inch PPC-6607 and 10.1-inch PPC-6610 touch-panel PCs (see farther below).

  • OnePlus 6 Launched; Features A 6.28-inch Screen With Notch And Full Glass Body

    The highly-awaited OnePlus 6 has been launched by the Chinese company OnePlus. Latest of the segment, OnePlus 6 features a 6.28-inch Optic AMOLED display, a notorious notch and carries the price tag of $529 for the starting variant.

    The phone can be availed in three colors namely Mirror Black, Midnight Black and the limited edition Silk White. Under the hood, you will find the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 along with two options of RAM (6GB and 8GB).

  • How Android P’s Gesture Navigation Works

Talos II Lite

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Raptor Launching Talos II Lite POWER9 Computer System At A Lower Cost

    For those that have been interested in the Talos II POWER-based system that is fully open-source down to the firmware but have been put off by its cost, Raptor Computer Systems today announced the Talos II Lite that is a slightly cut-down version of the Talos II Workstation.

    The Talos II Lite is still a very competent beast of a system and features a single POWER9 CPU socket, EATX chassis, 500W ATX power supply, and is sold as a barebones package. The Talos II Lite motherboard supports up to the 22-core POWER9 CPU, eight DDR4 ECC RAM slots, one PCI Express 4.0 x16 slot, one PCI Express 4.0 x8 slot, dual Gigabit Ethernet, four USB 3.0 ports, and one USB 2.0 port.

  • A little Talos of your very own

    Overall, that $3300 really does translate into greatly improved expandability in addition to the beefier power supplies, and thus it was never really an option for my needs personally. Maybe my mini:Quad analogy wasn't so off base. But if you want to join the POWER9 revolution on a budget and give Chipzilla the finger, as all right-thinking nerds should, you've now got an option that only requires passing a kidneystone of just half the size or less. It ships starting in July.

Gadgets With Linux or Modding

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Hardware
Gadgets
  • Open-source WearOS alternative “AsteroidOS” now available for several smartwatches
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 released: Open source smartwatch operating system (for Wear OS devices)
  • AsteroidOS 1.0, an open source smartwatch OS, released for certain Android Wear watches
  • Building a DIY amp kit that's great for vinyl records

    About a week after I wrapped up my last article where I talked about needing another stage of amplification to take advantage of my new 0.4mV phono cartridge, all the remaining bits and pieces I had ordered online to build the Muffsy phono head amplifier kit arrived. I had the amplifier kit, the power supply kit, the back-panel kit (all from Muffsy), the case (from a very efficient supplier in China), the temperature-controlled soldering station, and the wall wart (from a very efficient supplier in California).

    I watched the entertaining "how to solder" videos linked on Muffsy's site and realized I needed a few more things—like the thin solder mentioned on those videos and some solder wick. So, on an unusually bright and sunny Saturday morning, I visited a local electronics supply store, picked up the last items, and started building.

    [...]

    I contacted "the person behind Muffsy," Håvard Skrodahl, with some questions. He responded very quickly, and we ended up having a most delightful conversation. Moreover, it turns out Håvard is a system administrator and does this "kit thing" as a side gig. We discussed (or maybe lamented) that "back in the good old days" it was possible to buy all sorts of electronics kits, from Heathkit, Dynaco, David Hafler, and others. Today, there are still audio kits available, but it seems to be of lesser interest. Too bad! I am very grateful to Håvard for open sourcing so much of his materials.

  • UP Core SBC begins shipments

    Aaeon has begun shipping its community-backed “UP Core” SBC starting at $99, featuring a quad-core Atom x5-Z8350, up to 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi, BT, HDMI, USB 3.0, and RPi HAT compatibility.

    Aaeon has achieved volume production for its UP Core SBC, a smaller (66 x 56.5mm) version of the UP board. The UP Core supports the same OSes as the UP — Android 6.0, Ubuntu, Ubilinux, and Yocto based Linux, as well as Windows 10 and Windows IoT Core — running on the same quad-core, up to 1.84GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8350 from the Cherry Trail family.

Open Hardware: RISC-V and 3-D Printing

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Linux
Hardware
  • Develop your Linux apps on this RISC-V board

    A funny thing happened on the way to a writing up this hardware announcement. Going through all the cool features (which I’ll get to in a minute), I realized that this announcement is really about the software, whether that was the intention or not.

  • RISC-V Benchmarks Of SiFive's HiFive Unleashed Begin Appearing

    Over the past week, benchmarks of this first RISC-V development board have begun appearing on OpenBenchmarking.org by the Phoronix Test Suite. Here are some of those initial benchmark numbers.

    SiFive's HiFive Unleashed as a reminder is the first RISC-V Linux development board and uses the Freedom U540 SoC. SiFive claims this is the "world's fastest RISC-V processor" and is in a 4+1 multi-core design with clock speeds up to 1.5GHz, features a 2MB L2 cache, Gigabit Ethernet, 64-bit DDR4 with ECCm and is manufactured on a 28nm process. The HiFive Unleashed development board has 8GB of DDR4, 32MB quad SPI flash, microSD card for storage, and more via SiFive.com.

  • paradiddle, an open-source 3D-printed drumming prosthesis by dominic siguang ma

    ‘paradiddle’, an essential rudiment of drum beats, is an open-source 3D-printed upper-extremity prosthesis designed specifically for amputee drummer by young china-born and USA-based designer dominic siguang ma. to develop unique features that would allow the drummer to play more intuitively and comfortably, the designer worked with renowned amputee drummer greg anton.

Devices: Advantech, Alphamax, EVOC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Advantech continues its Arm push with QuadMax based Qseven module

    Advantech’s “ROM-7720” Qseven module runs Linux or Android on a hexa-core i.MX8 QuadMax with 4K, USB 3.0, PCIe, and SATA. The company is also partnering with Timesys on security services for its Arm-based boards and is co-hosting a Timesys webinar on the topic.

    We missed Advantech’s announcement about the NXP i.MX8 QuadMax based ROM-7720 module in the flurry of embedded news coming out of Embedded World show in late February. Full specs have now been posted for the 70 x 70mm Qseven 2.1 form-factor module, which is expected to ship in Q4. In related news, Timesys recently announced it is partnering with Advantech on security solutions for its Arm-based boards, and will host a webinar series on the topic starting May 17 (see farther below).

  • FPGA-driven Raspberry Pi add-on enables overlays on encrypted video

    Alphamax is crowdfunding an open source “NeTV2” video development add-on board for the Raspberry Pi with an Artix-7 FPGA, 4x PCIe lanes, 2x HDMI inputs, 2x HDMI outputs, and Python programming for overlaying content on encrypted video signals.

    Back in 2016, hardware hacker Bunnie Huang joined with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to sue the U.S. government to overturn the “onerous provisions” of Section 1201 of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). The provisions restrict access to copyrighted material “even where people want to make noninfringing fair uses of the materials they are accessing,” according to the EFF.

  • 15-inch touch-panel PC runs on Skylake or Bay Trail

    EVOC’s “PPC-1561” is a 15.6-inch, HD-ready, capacitive touch-panel computer with a 7th Gen “Skylake-U” or Bay Trail Celeron CPU, IP65 protection, SATA, mini-PCIe, and up to 4x GbE, 6x COM, and 6x USB ports.

Linux-Friendly Arduino Simplifies IoT Development

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Linux
Hardware

Arduino’s support for Linux IoT devices and single-board computers (SBCs) announced at the Embedded Linux Conference+Open IoT Summit NA in March cemented Arduino’s focus on cloud-connected IoT development, extending its reach into edge computing. This move was likely driven by multiple factors — increased complexity of IoT solutions and, secondarily, by more interest in Arduino boards running Linux.

In a “blending” of development communities for the masses — Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBone — Arduino’s support for Linux-based boards lowers the barrier of development for IoT devices by combining Arduino’s sensor and actuator nodes with higher processor-powered boards like Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone. Top this with a user-friendly web wizard to connect the Linux boards via the cloud and it simplifies the entire process.

The expanded support for more architectures by the cloud-connected Arduino Create web platform is an inevitable and natural evolution of Arduino’s mission that was born out of a thought to simplify complex technologies with easy-to-use and open-source software, enabling anybody to innovate by making complex technologies simple to use.

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TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
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