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Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Linksys is making its first modem / router hybrid

    Linksys, a networking company that makes both routers and modems, is now releasing a router / modem hybrid device that combines the two into one. While these kinds of devices aren’t exactly new, it is Linksys’s first shot at making one [...]

  • Congatec proposes API and middleware spec for COMs

    Congatec has launched a “ComX” standard for computer-on-module API and middleware spanning COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC form-factors.

    At the Embedded Systems Expo & Conference (ESEC) in Japan this week (May 10-12), Congatec announced an “extended standardization initiative” called ComX. The proposed standard builds upon existing computer-on-module hardware standards such as COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC to standardize APIs and middleware, including its new Cloud API. The spec also includes some hardware standardization for COM integration with carrier boards.

  • OK Google: make this Nest hack a standard feature

    This easy (“at your own risk”) hack can unlock a Nest thermostat’s “Cool” mode in heater-only installations, allowing control of a heater’s ventilation fan as though it’s an A/C.

  • Clustering system supports up to 72 ARM modules

    Christmann’s “RECS|Box” evaluation platform and server enclosures can cluster up to 72 Toradex Apalis COMs, and offer GbE and KVM switching.

    Toradex announced that Christmann Informationstechnik + Medien GmbH & Co. KG has launched several RECS|Box cluster-computing platforms for Toradex’s ARM-based, Linux-friendly Apalis computer-on-modules. The systems work with any of Toradex’s SODIMM-style, pin-compatible Apalis-brand modules, including the i.MX6-based Apalis iMX6, Tegra K1 based Apalis TK1, and the soon-to-ship, i.MX8-based Apalis iMX8, among others.

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Announcing coreboot 4.6

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are happy to announce the April 2017 release of coreboot, version 4.6.

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A proposal to remerge OpenWRT and LEDE

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Linux
Hardware

It appears that the OpenWRT and LEDE communities are about to vote on a proposal covering many of the details behind merging the two projects (which forked one year ago) back together. The plan appears to be to go forward with the OpenWRT name, but with the LEDE repository; domain names would be transferred to SPI.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Asus Tinker Board – An Inexpensive Home Theatre Solution

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Movies

The Asus Tinker Board is a computer designed for Single Board Computer hobbyists, makers & Internet of things enthusiasts. One of the highlights of the device is its multimedia support; it’s a tremendous prospect for the multimedia enthusiast on a budget. The computer has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but it has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali-T760 graphics processor (GPU). It’s available to purchase from Amazon (and other retailers), and currently priced at $59.99.

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Turning Raspberry Pi Into Listening Device

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Linux
Google
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Android smart speaker supports Alexa and Google Assistant

    An Android-based “Clazio” speaker and smart home hub features a 7-inch touchscreen, dual 5W speakers, and support for both Alexa and Google Assistant.

  • Linux-friendly Skylake modules can take the heat

    Eurotech has spun two rugged, Linux-friendly COM Express Type 6 modules in Basic and Compact form-factors, built on Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs.

    Eurotech’s 125 x 95mm COM Express Basic Type 6 “CPU-162-22” and 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 CPU-161-17 modules expand upon Intel’s 6th Gen Core “Skylake” processors, in EQ- and U-series models, respectively. Both COMs can run Linux or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise, and support Eurotech’s optional Everyware Software Framework (ESF), an IoT framework based on the Java/OSGi Eclipse Kura project.

  • GnuBee: Personal blobfree NAS/Cloud server for hackers

    GnuBee is a personal NAS (Network Attached Storage) cloud server that is currently being funded on crowdsupply. It is a low-cost, low-power, NAS device that runs GNU/Linux and it is claimed to be based on free, libre, and open source software. No proprietary drivers needed to use GnuBee.

Qseven module runs Linux on TI’s AM5728

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Linux
Hardware

Advantech’s Linux-driven “ROM-7510” module offers TI’s dual-core AM5728 SoC, 8GB eMMC, USB 3.0, PCIe, GbE, SATA, and industrial temperature support.

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More on Intel Back Doors

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Hardware
Security
  • Intel's remote AMT vulnerablity

    Intel chipsets for some years have included a Management Engine, a small microprocessor that runs independently of the main CPU and operating system. Various pieces of software run on the ME, ranging from code to handle media DRM to an implementation of a TPM. AMT is another piece of software running on the ME, albeit one that takes advantage of a wide range of ME features.

  • Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability Escalation of Privilege
  • Intel patches remote code-execution bug that lurked in chips for 10 years

    Remote management features that have shipped with Intel processors for almost a decade contain a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over the computers that run on vulnerable networks. That's according to an an advisory published Monday afternoon by Intel.

    Intel has released a patch for the vulnerability, which resides in the chipmaker's Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability. Business customers who buy computers running vPro processors use those services to remotely administer large fleets of computers. The bug doesn't affect chips running on consumer PCs. The chipmaker has rated the vulnerability critical and is recommending vulnerable customers install a firmware patch.

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More in Tux Machines

RancherOS: A tiny Linux for Docker lovers

Like the various Linux server and desktop distributions, the container-oriented Linux distributions mix and match various projects and components to construct a complete container infrastructure. These distros generally combine a minimal OS kernel, an orchestration framework, and an ecosystem of container services. RancherOS not only fits the mold, but takes the minimal kernel and the container paradigm to extremes. Read more

Review: System76’s Galago Pro solves “just works” Linux’s Goldilocks problem

The Linux world has long maintained a very specific rite of passage: wiping the default operating system from your laptop and plugging in a USB stick with your favorite distro's live CD. Some of us get a little, dare I say, giddy every time we wipe that other OS away and see that first flash of GRUB. Of course, rites of passage are supposed to be one-time events. Once you've wiped Windows or OS X a time or two, that giddiness vanishes—replaced by a feeling of annoyance, a kind of tax on being a Linux user. Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 3

After introducing yesterday a real GNOME vanilla session, let’s see how we are using this to implement small behavior differences and transforming current Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post. Read more

GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.