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Hardware

Devices: Steampunk, Axiomtek, Digi-Key, Nvidia, Tizen Studio

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Linux
Hardware
  • The Linux Steampunk Conference Badge

    I prototype, write, speak, and consult on physical computing gadgets and wanted a one-off attention-grabbing conference badge that would break the conversational ice when I walked around trade shows. That quest started a few years ago , with the first generation Arduino Pro-Mini and a 1.8” color TFT screen conference badge.

  • Networking appliance runs Linux on new quad- and octa-core Denverton CPUs

    Axiomtek’s “NA362” net appliance features Intel’s Atom C3538 and C3758 chips, and offers 6x GbE, 4x 10GbE SFP+, mini-PCIe, SATA, and up to 128GB DDR4 RAM.

    Axiomtek’s NA362 network appliance, which sits on the high end of our embedded coverage, gives you a choice of two new members of Intel’s Atom C3000 “Denverton” family: the quad-core C3538 and octa-core C3758. Earlier Linux-friendly Denverton products that we’ve covered were COM Express Basic Type 7 modules that tapped the original 16-core, 2.2GHz C3000. These include DFI’s DV970, Congatec’s Conga-B7AC, and Portwell’s PCOM-B701.

  • Digi-Key ready to ship the mangOH Red open source hardware platform

    Targeted at the industrial IoT and maker communities, mangOH Red is what Sierra Wireless claims to be the most feature-rich, lowest power open source enablement platform on the market.

  • Nvidia sets sights on the driverless revolution with Drive PX Pegasus

    On Tuesday, Nvidia announced a new version of its automotive-grade compute platforms, Drive PX Pegasus. It's recognition that the computational needs of fully autonomous (also known as level 5) vehicles are going to be demanding. Such vehicles will have to fuse inputs from multiple sensors and sensor-types, then make sense of it all with no fuss to get us from A to B. "The reality is we need more horsepower to get to level 5," said Danny Shapiro, Nvidia's senior director of automotive.

  • Tizen Studio gets updated to version 1.3 with Native UI builder and standalone RT IDE

Devices and TIzen Software

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux Certify HGST Flash Storage Solution on QuantaStor SDS
  • Synology 2018 Event: DSM 6.2 With Windows/Linux Virtualization, 4K HDR10 & New NAS Ranges

    All companies like to get the word out about their products, but Synology takes things to another level by touring the world and giving as many people access to product launches and feature updates as possible. Its latest round of events can be found in 17 different countries, with the next, Netherlands, taking place on October 12. The festivities wrap up in South Korea on October 26.

  • Purism's Linux phone successfully crowdfunded

    Purism's open source mobile phone has been been successfully crowdfunded when it reached and passed its goal of $1.5 million, with 13 days left.

    Librem 5 security and privacy-focused smartphone is powered by a GNU/Linux operating system based on Debian GNU/Linux and running only Open Source software apps on top of a popular desktop environment like KDE Plasma Mobile or GNOME Shell.

  • In Device We Trust: Measure Twice, Compute Once with Xen, Linux, TPM 2.0 and TXT

    OpenEmbedded Linux supports a range of x86 and ARM devices, while Xen isolates operating systems and unikernels. Applications and drivers from multiple ecosystems can run concurrently, expanding technical and licensing options. Special-purpose software can be securely composed with general-purpose software in isolated VMs, anchored by a hardware-assisted root of trust defined by customer and OEM policies. This architecture allows specialist software vendors to share platform and hardware support costs, while supporting emerging and legacy software ecosystems that have different rates of change.

  • 64bit quad-core Risc-V for Linux

    “RISC-V is a free and open instruction set architecture [ISA] designed to enable chips across the full spectrum of computing devices, from embedded devices to the data centre,” said the firm.

    “The release of the U54-MC Coreplex marks the architecture’s expansion into the application processor space – opening entirely new use cases for RISC-V. It is ideal for applications which need full operating system support such as AI, machine learning, networking, gateways and smart IoT devices.”

  • Seamlessly access your favorite Tizen apps with Shake N Launch
  • Multi Language Voice Calculator added to the Tizen Store

Open Hardware

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Hardware

Linux Hardware: AMD, RISC V, BlackBerry Motion

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Packs In More AMDGPU Features For Linux 4.15

    The Linux 4.15 kernel is looking to be a very exciting update for AMDGPU DRM driver users.

    AMDGPU for Linux 4.15 is already very exciting as it should finally have the DC display code and enabled by default for RX Vega users. On top of that there's also been other AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager work including an increased fragment size and a variety of other changes.

  • 2018 will be the year of the RISC V Linux processors

    Linux fanboys tend to announce a lot of “year of” events. There is the year of the desktop which appears to be every year and still never happens and now there is the year of RISC V Linux processor.

  • BlackBerry Motion Is Now Official with Android 7.1 and No Physical Keyboard

    Only a few days after it leaked online, the Android-powered BlackBerry Motion smartphone was made official earlier today by BlackBerry at the GITEX 2017 event that takes place these days in Dubai, UAE.

    At first glance, BlackBerry Motion appears to be a variant of the BlackBerry KEYone smartphone, but without a physical keyboard, which is a bit unusual for a BlackBerry phone. The device is powered by Google's Android 7.1 "Nougat" mobile OS and has some interesting specifications for a mid-range mobile phone.

    Featuring a gorgeous 5.5-inch Full HD 1080p display with minimum bezels and an IP67 certified water-resistant design, BlackBerry Motion is using a Snapdragon 625 processor, 4GB of RAM, 32GB internal storage, a 12MP f/2.0 rear camera, a fingerprint reader, and a giant, non-removable 4,000mAh battery that should last all day long.

Devices: Nova, Android and Tizen

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Linux Networking Hardware for Beginners: LAN Hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The traditional local area network is connected with an Ethernet switch and Cat cables. The basic components of an Ethernetwork are network interface cards (NICs), cables, and switches. NICs and switches have little status lights that tell you if there is a connection, and the speed of the connection. Each computer needs an NIC, which connects to a switch via an Ethernet cable. Figure 1 shows a simple LAN: two computers connected via a switch, and a wireless access point routed into the wired LAN.

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Devices: SiFive's RISC-V, New Hardware, and Purism’s Librem 5

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

RISC-V Boots Linux at SiFive, LEDE 17.01.3 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Desktops and Devices: Market Share, System76, Raspberry Pi, OSMC, and Ataribox

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Steam Linux Usage Put At 0.6% For September, Contrary To Other Inflated Numbers

    Meanwhile the Netmarketshare data showed Linux almost doubling over the past month, but likely due to some flaw in the system or reporting discrepancy with Android/Chrome-OS. In fact, since the earlier drama today, has already been revised lower to 4.83%. Though that number is still likely artificially higher due to Chrome & co.

  • System76 Galago Pro review

     

    A high-end laptop that offers a stylish all-aluminium design, lots of processing power, a generous selection of ports and a vibrant HiDPI screen for a reasonable price. Just don’t stray too far from a wall socket as the battery life barely lasts half a day’s work.

  • Little Backup Box Update and FAQ

    I’ve been traveling quite a bit lately. And to fight the battery anxiety syndrome, I’ve bought an Anker PowerCore 20100 mAh power bank. This relatively compact and light pack features two USB charging ports capable of delivering up to 2.4 mAh.

    Now that I have plenty of power when I’m on the move, I no longer need to rely on Raspberry Pi Zero to run the Little Backup Box script. So I upgraded my mobile photo backup box to Raspberry Pi 3.

  • OSMC's September update is here

    OSMC's September update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape.

  • Atari to release new gaming console that runs Linux

    Atari has recently announces that they are coming back into the console market, and are releasing a console dubbed the “AtariBox” and the kicker is; it runs Linux!

    On Sept. 26, Atari released a new photo of the Ataribox, made of real wood, and I must say that it looks absolutely gorgeous! A video of the device can be found on the Ataribox homepage.

Devices: Gonimo, Building an ARM64 Laptop, and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to create a free baby monitoring system with Gonimo

    New and expecting parents quickly learn that there is a long—and expensive—list of equipment that a new baby needs. High on that list is a baby monitor, so they can keep an eye (and an ear) on their infant while they're doing other things. But this is one piece of equipment that doesn't have to eat into your baby fund; Gonimo is a free and open source solution that turns existing devices into a baby monitoring system, freeing up some of your baby budget for any of the thousands of other must-have or trendy items lining the aisles of the nearby big-box baby store.

    [...]

    If you know Haskell or want to learn it, you can check out our code at GitHub. Pull requests, code reviews, and issues are all welcome.

    And, finally, please help by spreading the word to new parents and the open source world that the Gonimo baby monitor is simple to use and already in your pocket.

  • Building an ARM64 laptop

    Processors based on the 64-bit ARM architecture have been finding their way into various types of systems, including mobile handsets and servers. There is a distinct gap in the middle of the range, though: there are no ARM64 laptops. Bernhard Rosenkränzer and a group of colleagues set out to change that situation by building such a laptop from available components. He showed up at the 2017 Open Source Summit North America to present the result.

    He started by addressing the question of why one would want to build an ARM64 laptop in the first place. The ARM architecture is known for low power use — a useful feature in a laptop in its own right — but there is more to the ARM story than that; the ARM64 chips are fast and can beat single-core Intel Core-M processors on some benchmarks. An ARM64 laptop may not be good for fast kernel builds, but it can do what most people need, and it can do the kernel builds too in the end. ARM processors need no fans, meaning that the resulting laptop is lighter and will not burn the user's legs. There is little or no malware targeting ARM64 systems, for now at least.

  • Fanless, rugged box-PC runs Linux on Kaby Lake

    Axiomtek’s rugged “eBOX700-891-FL” computer runs Linux or Win 10 IoT on Intel 7th Gen Core chips, and features 4x GbE, 6x USB, 2x mini-PCIe, and PCI x4.

  • 5.25-inch Apollo Lake SBC has up to 4x GbE ports
  • World’s first ESP32 industrial computer has extensive wireless options

    Techbase unveiled a “Moduino” automation controller with an ESP32-WROVER module plus WiFi, BT, and optional LoRa, Sigfox, LTE, Ethernet, and battery power.

    Polish embedded firm Techbase was one of the first manufacturers to tap the original Raspberry Pi Compute Module in 2014 with its ModBerry 500 automation controller, and has since updated it to an RPi Compute Module 3 based ModBerry 500 M3. Now, it is introducing the Moduino, which it calls the world’s first ESP32-based industrial computer.

  • Open Source USB-Key-Fob Allows Makers to Add the Peripherals They Need
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

Games: DRAG, Geneshift, Balloonatics and More

Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018