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Hardware

The System76 Galago Pro is a fierce featherweight competitor

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Hardware
Reviews

For most people running Linux on a laptop, chances are they had to go through the ritual of wiping Windows and installing the Linux OS. It’s a time-honored tradition in the Linux world, but things are slowly changing, with Linux now coming preinstalled on some very nice portables. Case in point: the ultralight System76 Galago Pro, a laptop that pleasantly surprised me more than once.

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Also: Is Linux faster than Windows ?

Raspberry Pi With Open Port 22

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Linux
Hardware
Security

Linux and Android Devices

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Android
Linux
Hardware

3 off-the-shelf Linux computers compared

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Linux
Hardware

While the options for Linux computers from commercial vendors are still needles in the proverbial haystack of OEM Windows equipment out there, there are more and more options available to a consumer who wants a good, solid device that's ready-to-use with no messing around.

Still, there are more Linux OEM computers than I could look at for one article—and the options tend to be different in Europe than they are in the United States, with providers like Entroware that don't ship to the latter at all.

In this article, I look at offerings from three of the most well-known Linux OEMs on the western side of the pond: ZaReason, System76, and Dell.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • EPIC SBC supports Kaby Lake or Skylake

    Aaeon’s “EPIC-KBS7” SBC supports 6th or 7th gen Intel Core CPUs, and offers wide-range power, 2x GBE ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and SATA, HDMI, and mini-PCIe.

  • 2018 Toyota Camry to feature Linux-based infotainment system in the US
  • Catalog of 98 open-spec, hacker friendly SBCs

    Our 2017 hacker board survey is now live. To earn a chance to win a free SBC, participate in our 3-minute survey of these 98 sub-$200 hacker-friendly SBCs.

    Over the last year, LinuxGizmos has reported on dozens of new community backed, open spec, hacker- and developer-friendly single board computers that run Linux and Android. We’ve added these to a curated list of earlier boards to publish a catalog of 98 SBCs. The boards included in our survey must be priced under $200 (not counting shipping), have a promised shipment availability by July, and meet our relatively flexible selection criteria for open source compliance (see farther below).

  • SBCs

    Highlights for me include Odroid-C2 which does make a nice PC client and is very suitable for hacking into some project like the Raspberry Pi and the like. It’s one drawback is that it’s still not supported completely by Linux. It needs some magical bits to boot. Then there’s FireFly RK3399 which comes close to what I want for a server except RAM is limited to 4GB and SATA requires use of USB or M.2 PCIe. Other better boards are too expensive to make the list. The doubly priced Marvell Community Board is an example.

  • Choose Your Favorite Linux Hacker SBCs and Enter to Win a Free Board

Raspberry Pi foundation merges with CoderDojo Foundation

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi Foundation and the CoderDojo Foundation have merged in order to combine forces and accelerate both organisation's mission to teach kids how to code.

Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Philip Colligan wrote that the two organisations “see an opportunity to do even more by joining forces.” CoderDojo's executive director Giustina Mizzoni says the merger means her organisation's students and volunteer mentors will enjoy “access to the best possible support, including access to the world’s best educational materials and resources.”

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Also: ARM debuts Cortex-A75 and Cortex-A55 with AI in mind

Linux Devices: FriendlyElec, NComputing, CubieTech

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Linux
Hardware

Linux-based gizmo offers remote 3D printer control and sharing

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Linux
Hardware

The $70 “Waggle” remote controller device for 3D printers offers a mobile app with a video feed and temp controls, plus a cloud-based slicing service.

A Seoul-based startup called Ateam Ventures is closing in on its $10,000 Kickstarter goal for a Waggle 3D printer controller equipped with WiFi and a 720p video camera. The early bird packages are gone, but you can pre-order a Waggle for $70, discounted from the $99 retail price. The campaign runs through June 15, with shipments due in September.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

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Hardware
  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC

    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.

  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.

  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio

    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.

  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments

    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.

  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop

    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer.

    However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.

  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core

    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board.

    Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

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More in Tux Machines

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable. Read more

Firefly COM dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. Read more

Games: Morphite, Mooseman, Arma, and PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller

  • Stylish FPS 'Morphite' released without Linux support, but it's coming
    Sadly, Morphite [Steam] has seen a delay with the Linux version. Thankfully, the developer was quick to respond and it's still coming.
  • The Mooseman, a short side-scrolling adventure just released for Linux
    In the mood for something a little out there? Well, The Mooseman [Steam] a short side-scroller might just hit the spot.
  • Arma 3 1.76 for Linux is planned, work on it to start "soon"
    Bohemia Interactive have announced in their latest "SITREP" that the Linux version of Arma 3 will be updated to the latest version of 1.76, work is set to start on it "soon".
  • Sony's PlayStation 4 DualShock Controller Now Supported in Fedora Linux, GNOME
    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera talks in his latest blog post about the enhancements he managed to implement in the past few weeks to the Bluetooth stack of the Fedora Linux operating system. The patches submitted by the developer to the Bluetooth packages in the latest Fedora Linux release promise to bring improvements to the way PlayStation 3 DualShock controllers are set up in the environment if you're using the GNOME desktop environment. Until now, to set up a DualShock 3 controller, users had to plug it in via USB, then disconnect it, and then press the "P" button on the joypad, which would have popped-up a dialog to confirm the Bluetooth connection. But this method had some quirks though.

Debian Development Reports

  • Free software log (July and August 2017)
    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years. After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017
    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125
    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.