Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

MIPS Creator CI20 v Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Imagination Technologies is a British company that has recently entered full production of a board based on MIPS computer architecture. The single-board computer has been designed to allow developers to create applications for mobiles, gaming, Internet of Things, and wearables.

The MIPS Creator CI20 is billed as a high-performance, fully featured Linux and Android development platform. The board includes an Ingenic JZ4780 SoC which is built around a dual-core MIPS32 processor clocked at 1.2GHz, and Imagination's PowerVR SGX540 GPU. The Creator CI20 comes with a price tag of or £50, which is significantly more expensive than the Raspberry Pi 2. CI20 is an open platform with technical manuals, schematics and source code freely downloadable. You might be interested in my Raspberry Pi 2 review together with this article.

Read more

Ubuntu 15.04 Will Attempt To Better Update CPU Microcodes

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Dimitri John Ledkov of Intel has added support to the Ubuntu-Drivers-Common framework for having CPU family detection and being able to install the appropriate CPU microcode update packages depending on the reported processor family. It's basically just making sure the right CPU microcode packages are installed rather than having them not installed or having all of them in place.

Read more

Why We Need Free Digital Hardware Designs

Filed under
GNU
Hardware

To what extent do the ideas of free software extend to hardware? Is it a moral obligation to make our hardware designs free, just as it is to make our software free? Does maintaining our freedom require rejecting hardware made from nonfree designs?

Free software is a matter of freedom, not price; broadly speaking, it means that users are free to use the software and to copy and redistribute the software, with or without changes. More precisely, the definition is formulated in terms of the four essential freedoms.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 2 review

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The new Raspberry Pi 2 proclaims that it is 6x faster than the original Pi, taking the original machine to a new level. The big leaps focus on the processor and memory, with the machine now replacing a single core CPU with a quad core Broadcom BCM2836 CPU. The RAM has jumped to a very respectable 1GB.

Read more

Using a Samsung Xpress C460FW with Gentoo Linux and Android KitKat for printing and scanning

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

A work colleague has just received a Samsung Xpress C460FW MFP (laser printer, scanner, copier and fax machine) for small print jobs. It is possible to connect to it via USB, Direct USB, wired network, wireless network, Wi-Fi Direct and NFC; that’s impressive for a MFP that can be purchased for GBP 270 in the UK.

Toshiba Laptops To Have Improved Support In Linux 3.20

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The platform-drivers-x86 pull request has been filed for the Linux 3.20 kernel and it includes some prominent additions.

First up, the Toshiba ACPI driver (toshiba_acpi) is closer to feature-parity with its Windows counterpart. The Linux Toshiba ACPI driver now supports USB Sleep & Charge functions, USB Sleep functions under battery, USB Rapid Charge, USB Sleep & Music, support for keyboard functions mode, support for Panel Power On, support to enable/disable USB 3, etc. There's also driver clean-ups and other improvements for this ACPI laptop driver specifically for Toshiba hardware.

Read more

Intel now No. 1 sponsor of Linux contributions

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

Intel, one of the world's largest computer hardware companies, is now also among the biggest contributors to open-source software.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 2 vs Creator 120

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

The Creator 120 and the Raspberry Pi 2 are single-board computers designed for developers and hobbyists.

The Creator C120 was announced in late 2014, but started shipping at about the same time that the Raspberry Pi 2 was announced/starting shipping, which was just last week.

I haven’t purchased a Raspberry Pi 2 yet, but I received a Creator 2 from the manufacturer this week. It was a prize I won in December and the first prize I ever won on the Internet. I’ve been playing with it all day and find it to be a very capable single-board computer. Out of the box, it’s mostly a plug-and-play device.

Read more

Review: 2015 Dell XPS 13 (9343) Running Linux

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When and if Eric reads this he’s just going to shake his head. For two years in a row now I’ve been lured by the wonders of new laptops announced at CES, and in both years I’ve been disappointed. He tells me I’m stupid for ordering the “new shiny” and expecting it to work, but I refuse to give up my dream.

Luckily this isn’t a huge issue for me since my main machines are desktops, but my second generation Dell XPS 13 “sputnik” is getting a little old. I am really looking forward to a slightly larger screen. The pixel density isn’t great on my laptop, especially compared to what is out now, and I am finding myself a little cramped for screen real estate.

Read more

Also: Linux support for the Dell XPS 13 9343 (2015 model)

Attention Linux gamers: Valve, Khronos to reveal next-gen OpenGL successor at GDC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Gaming

It's a great time to be alive if you're a fanatic about the particulars of various performance-boosting graphics APIs. AMD's Mantle is here, Microsoft's DirectX 12 is coming with Windows 10, and at GDC in early March we'll hear the first news about a successor to the open-source, cross-platform OpenGL API.

That's not necessarily huge news if you're using a Windows machine—unless this OpenGL successor is really special, most games will probably stick with DirectX 12 in a perpetual love/hate relationship. If you're a Mac or Linux gamer, however, the next-generation OpenGL is potentially a huge deal.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.