Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Lichee Pi Zero is a tiny Linux computer module for $6 (crowdfunding)

    The Raspberry Pi Zero has some new competition. A Chinese company is running a crowdfunding campaign for a tiny computer-on-a-module called the Lichee Pi Zero that’s priced as low as $6.

  • ARM/FPGA module runs Debian on Arria 10 SoC

    The Reflex CES Arria 10 SoC SoM runs Linux on the ARM/FPGA Arria 10 SoC, and is available with SBC and PCIe-style carrier boards.

    The Arria 10 SoC SoM has been listed on the Intel FPGA site — the new name for Altera — since October, when iWave’s similarly Arria 10 equipped Arria 10 SoC Module appeared. Enclustra’s Arria 10-based Mercury+ AA1 module was unveiled in January. Reflex CES recently began shipping the Debian Linux driven Arria 10 SoC SoM, along with two optional carrier boards.

  • SMARC 2.0 COM runs Linux on Apollo Lake

    The MSC SM2S-AL SMARC 2.0 “short” COM offers an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display and industrial temp support, and an optional, Linux-driven starter kit.

  • Nintendo NES Classic Mini

    After months of trying, I've finally got my hands on a Nintendo NES Classic Mini. It's everything I wish retropie was: simple, reliable, plug-and-play gaming. I didn't have a NES at the time, so the games are all mostly new to me (although I'm familiar with things like Super Mario Brothers).

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Book review: Up to no good with 'Raspberry Pi for Secret Agents'

    It all started with the Raspberry Pi as a Christmas present, and we started with the Raspberry Pi Education Manual as our guide. As a free download, it was a very good primer to get started. Then we moved onto other books, such as Getting Started with Raspberry Pi, and I started to notice some patterns. Those books often covered the same things over and over: getting the system to boot with Raspbian, visual programming with Scratch, and using the GPIO pins. Also, I noticed that the books focused on how to use the disparate features of the Raspberry Pi, but they didn’t have a common goal or theme in mind. Both of these observations led to my next observation that my daughter’s excitement in Raspberry Pi books started to wane because it felt like we were slogging through math textbooks as opposed to reading with an exciting goal in mind.

  • Industrial thin Mini-ITX runs on 7th Gen Intel CPUs

    Congatec’s “Conga-IC175” is a Linux-friendly thin Mini-ITX board with Kaby Lake CPUs, wide-range power, Intel Optane support, and PCIe and M.2 expansion.

  • Qnap launches TS-453Bmini NAS
  • QNAP Announces the TS-453Bmini Vertical NAS

Hardware and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hardware and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Snowden calls for AMD to open source

    Whistle blowing spook Edward Snowden says that AMD could kick Intel to death if it open sources its PSP and firmware.

    In an odd tweet, Snowden appeared to be jolly excited about the release of AMD’s new Ryzen desktop processor. But he said that the release of such a good product would be a good moment for AMD to open source their PSP & firmware.

    “In the next cycles, many will discuss replacing Intel. This is a low-cost, low-risk opportunity for AMD to distinguish themselves from Intel on an on-going basis. It's a shame to miss it,” he wrote.

  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu – Here is what you have to do to fix constant crashes!
  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu - Here is What You Have to Do to Fix Constant Crashes

    Of course, you can always download the kernel of your choice from the Mainline Kernel PPA, and use dpkg to install it yourself as well, rather than rely on their script.

  • How to Build a Linux Rig

    When building a machine, you must take manufacturer into consideration if you’re building for Linux. If you want a Linux machine and don’t want to worry that your build won’t work, there are several vendors to choose from (one of which is Dell). If you want all your Steam games to work, the best choice of Linux to put on it (short of putting Steam OS on it) is Ubuntu Linux. In the following article, I’m going to walk you through how to pick parts for your Linux machine.

Raspberry Pi Projects

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos
  • Program LEGO Mindstorms robots over WiFi with BrickPi

    For the past year, I've been teaching students how to build and program robots using the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 platform. From the outset, I wanted to find a way to use Scratch and other open source programming languages to extend the capabilities of the platform. That search led me to BrickPi, a Raspberry Pi add-on board from Dexter Industries that easily interfaces with Mindstorms sensors and motors. I requested a teacher trial to see what it could do.

  • Try the Raspberry PIXEL Platform on Your Desktop

    Anyone familiar with Linux likely has some knowledge of the Raspberry Pi. That may not necessarily equate to having experienced one of the greatest embedded platforms on the planet.

    If you’re unfamiliar with the Pi, let me introduce you. The tagline for the Raspberry Pi is Teach, learn, and make with Raspberry Pi. The Pi is a series of single board computers (developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation) to promote the teaching of basic computer science. Thing is, the small-form factor device became incredibly popular beyond the educational environment. People around the globe embraced these boards and, with the help of embedded Linux, began to invent. To that end, as of September, 2016, more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards have been sold.

  • A beginner’s guide to Raspberry Pi 3

    On Windows, just right click on the card and choose the formatting option. If you're on desktop Linux, different DEs use different tools, and covering all the DEs is beyond the scope of this story. I have written a tutorial using the command line interface on Linux to format an SD card with Fat32 file system.

More Devices

Filed under
Hardware
  • Can I host my site at home on a Raspberry Pi? YES!

    Escape the fogginess and uncertainty of a cloud solution and host your own site at home. A recent convergence of technologies has made this obvious solution both simple and desirable.

  • FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus -- a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

    The Raspberry Pi line of mini computers -- including the all-new Pi Zero W -- are wonderful devices for what they are. Quite frankly, they have inspired many young people to learn about programming, while helping makers to create some really cool projects. With that said, the Pi computers are not the only System on a Chip solutions on the market. Actually, there are more powerful ARM-based offerings available. The problem? They are often radically more expensive than Raspberry Pi.

  • Ultimaker files first patents, remains 'committed' to open source 3D printer development

    Netherlands-based 3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker has filed its first ever patents. The company says the patents are “defensive,” to protect against patent infringement lawsuits, and that it remains “100% committed to [its] open source ethos.”

Razer and Ryzen with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Razer Is Planning Better Laptop Support On Linux

    Razer co-founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan has shared plans to improve their Linux support, at least when it comes to their Blade laptops.

    Razer hasn't provided official support for their products under Linux, although some community members have created third-party tools for customizing their keyboards, mice, and other gaming peripherals under Linux. Recently, Razer has been getting into the high-end laptop game and while it's x86 hardware, they are looking to ensure it's a good Linux experience.

  • Extra AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Benchmarks

    Assuming you have already checked out this morning's Ryzen 7 1800X Linux benchmarks, here are some more data points while putting the finishing touches on the Ryzen 7 Linux gaming benchmarks being published later today.

    For these interim benchmarks are some more data from the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've done in my benchmarks since receiving this processor yesterday.

  • AMD Ryzen/Zen Currently Doesn't Support Coreboot Today

    Back in 2011 was the glorious announcement that AMD would support Coreboot with its future CPUs. Sadly, a lot has changed at AMD over the past half-decade, and there isn't any Coreboot support to find today for Zen/Ryzen.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • New Photos of the $89 Pinebook Linux Laptop Surface Online

    The $89 Pinebook ARM laptop was supposed to go on sale in February.

    Sadly, the month came and went without so much as a peep from Pine64, the company behind the Pinebook.

    But today we’ve some good news. The device hasn’t evaporated into the ether.

  • The Gemini is an Android-powered keyboard PDA, with Linux dual boot option

    If you miss the era of the keyboard personal digital assistant (PDA) – that is, that strange animal that is trapped in the middle of being a netbook and a smartphone – you might be one of a few. But then again, there was so much to the PDAs in that time – from your Nokia E90 Communicator, to the Dell Axim PDAs, and the HTC Wizard devices. So London-based Planet Computers is bringing the PDA back with the Gemini – an Android-powered PDA with a keyboard and network connectivity like a modern smartphone.

  • The Three Charts Requested by Fans: Made Free by Popular Demand from TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 Edition (Updated)
  • The sad truth about the excitement over the Nokia 3310

    Mobile World Congress – the showcase of the most cutting-edge technology on the planet – is in full swing in Barcelona this week. Phones, wearables and everything else with a microchip is showing off fantastic new features. But all anyone really seems interested in is a remake of a phone from 17 years ago, the Nokia 3310.

    There are a few ways to look at the Nokia 3310. It could just be a marketing ploy, or a Hollywood-esque remake because the industry has run out of ideas. Or maybe it’s trying to tap into the feeling that modern life is too connected, harking back to a simpler time. But whatever you think the Nokia 3310 is, it tells us something interesting about the state of the smartphone industry in 2017.

    “It’s an absolutely damning indictment of the state of the smartphone market that the world is so excited and obsessed with a retro feature phone that shipped 17 years ago,” said Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight.

  • Embedded Linux Conference 2017 Videos Now Online

    If you are interested in embedded Linux development but missed out last week's Linux Foundation event in Portland, the videos are now available online.

    Last week was the Linux Foundation's annual Embedded Linux Conference with a wide-range of mobile and embedded talks. Details from the event are available here.

AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

The day many of you have been waiting for is finally here: AMD Zen (Ryzen) processors are shipping! Thanks to AMD coming around at the last minute, I received a Ryzen 7 1800X yesterday evening and have been putting it through its paces. Here is my walkthrough of the Linux experience for the AMD Ryzen and new motherboard and a number of the initial Linux benchmarks for this high-end Zen CPU while much more coverage is coming in the hours and days ahead.

Read more

Raspberry Pi Zero W in the Media

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian 9 Review: Stable Like Ever, Better Than Most

Debian is one of the oldest and most famous Linux distributions of all time. Its development started back in 1993 by its founder Ian Murdock who passed away in 2015. It’s also known to be the mother-distribution of tens of other Linux distributions such as Ubuntu. Debian has a strict policy on software packages. It only ships free software by default. It doesn’t even ship non-free firmware and drivers. If you want, you can enable the non-free package repository later to install those packages. But you won’t find it there by default. Debian is well-known for its stability. They don’t ship new updates to users unless it was tested. Which is why you may notice some very old package versions when using Debian. It’s correct that they are old, but they are also tested and secure. Most discovered vulnerabilities get patched in Debian in a matter of hours or few days. Those users who would like to get latest and most updated software could switch to using the testing or unstable branch. Both contain more modern software according to a different policy. The effort which is being done by the Debian project for each release is huge. Currently, they offer 25000 source packages and 51000 binary packages. Getting all of those software from upstream projects, packaging them, testing them, debugging issues and fixing them is definitely not something you hear about everyday. Read more Also: Upgrade to Debian Stretch - GlusterFS fails to mount New: VOYAGER 9 Debian Stretch

Liri – Loves me, loves me not … at all

What does the world of Linux need more? Desktop environments? Nope. Ah, well, you’d be surprised, because a fresh new challenger appears! Its name is Liri, and it is the presentation layer for the namesake operating system being baked in the forges of community creativity as we speak. Sounds potentially interesting, but then we must be wary. I’ve trawled through the obscure, uncharted waters of Budgie, Razor-Qt and more recently, and with much greater attention to detail, LXQt, and in all of these cases, I was left rather dissatisfied with the end product. Not enough cohesion, quality, future roadmap, and most importantly, the finesse that you expect from polished, professional products. Then again, building a desktop environment is a huge undertaking, probably even more complex than spinning a new distro, and so, it’s not a coincidence that there are few serious contenders in this space. But Liri comes with enticing artwork, a promise of Material Design for the desktop, and so here we are, trying to get the first feel of what it does. Read more

Microsoft Breaches and Their Impact

Essential Applications for GNU/Linux Users

So, you’ve made the switch from Windows or MacOSX to GNU/Linux, congratulations! There is a good chance that you’ve also installed a distribution like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, or perhaps Manjaro; and so you have a wide range of software already installed. However, There are a number of applications that don’t always ship by default, that I feel every user should have or at least be aware of, and some that people have by default but have not ventured to use; so I thought a list of essential applications was in order! Read more