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Hardware

Rugged, Linux-driven IoT gateways are optimized for sensor monitoring

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Neousys’ IGT-33V and IGT-34C gateways run Debian on a TI AM3352 and offer PoE+ PD, isolated DIO, and 8x 0-10V (33V) or 4x 4-20mA (34C) analog inputs. They follow similar IGT30 and IGT-31D models that focus on digital outputs.

We missed Neousys’ January announcement of its IGT30 and IGT-31D IoT gateways, both of which run a Debian 9 Linux stack on a Texas Instruments Sitara AM3352 SoC. Now, the company has followed up with similar IGT-33V and IGT-34C models. The rugged new DIN-rail systems specialize in analog inputs and digital outputs compared to the earlier digital input focused models. All four IGT-30 series models, which are aimed primarily at sensor monitoring, among other industrial IoT applications, are covered below.

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Devices With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • [Older] Wind River Four-Step Procedure to Secure Linux-Based Systems

    The world is increasingly interconnected and a result of this is the exposure to security vulnerabilities has dramatically increased as well. The intricacies of maintaining today's Linux-based platforms make it very challenging for developers to cover every potential entry point. In 2019 there was an average of more than 45 CVEs logged per day. How does a development organization keep up with that? In order to stay on top of this, developers must increasingly spend more time and effort integrating common vulnerabilities and exposure (CVE) patches into their solutions, at the cost of spending time developing their applications

    Security attacks come in many forms and use various entry points. Each attack type comes in several flavors, as there is usually more than one way that they can be configured or camouflaged based on the experience, resources, and determination of the hacker. While some threats are more prevalent than others, a developer needs to protect against all vulnerabilities. The following chart shows the increase in CVEs over the last 6 years, and how many of those CVEs actually impact any given distribution.

  • 4K Digital Signage Player Drives up to 4x 4K Displays with AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC

    We’ve covered plenty of AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SBC‘s, as well as some mini PC‘s, but the processor’s multimedia capabilities make it an ideal candidate for advanced digital signage players capable of driving multiple 4K displays.

    Axiomtek leveraged those capabilities in DSP600-211 4K digital signage player that offers four HDMI ports driving up to four 4K displays, as well as dual Gigabit Ethernet.

  • 3.5-inch Whiskey Lake SBC has mini-PCIe and dual M.2

    Aaeon’s 3.5-inch “GENE-WHU6” SBC runs on an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake CPU with up to 32GB RAM, 4x USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports, 2x GbE, and 2x M.2 slots, starting at under $1K.

    Over the last few days, Aaeon’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake based PICO-WHU4 Pico-ITX board, which we covered in February, has received a lot of attention from the tech press, with the inevitable comparisons to the Raspberry Pi 4. Although a commercial Intel-based board is a world away from an Arm-based maker board like the Pi in terms of community support and price on the one hand and CPU power on the other, the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form factor is as close as the x86 world comes to the compact, 87 x 56mm Raspberry Pi footprint.

  • Five years of Raspberry Pi clusters

Linux powered automotive computer is loaded with wireless

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Eurotech’s rugged “DynaGate 20-30” is an automotive-certified IoT edge gateway that runs Linux on an Apollo Lake SoC with LTE Cat 4, WiFi, BLE, GPS, 2x GbE, and isolated DIO, serial, and CAN.

A week after announcing a BoltGate 20-31 transportation computer aimed at rolling stock applications, Eurotech has unveiled an “automotive-certified Multi-service IoT Edge Gateway.” The fanless DynaGate 20-30 runs the same Yocto-derived Eurotech Everyware Linux distribution with Eclipse tooling and Azul Java support on the same Intel Apollo Lake platform used by the BoltGate 20-31.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, WinSystems and Estone

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • How to Fight Coronavirus With Your Raspberry Pi

    With the coronavirus pandemic raging, many PC users have dedicated CPU cycles to medical research using Folding@Home (we’re even doing a fold-off competition with AnandTech). Though Folding@Home does not run on a Raspberry Pi, you can participate in Rosetta@Home, a similar project that’s also researching COVID-19, by installing a free Linux app called BOINC.

    BOINC has been around for a long time and supports many different research projects, including Asteroids@Home, which does space research, and some of these projects will work on Raspbian, Raspberry Pi’s official OS. However, the addition of Rosetta@Home is new, and if you want to join that project, you need to run BOINC on a 64-bit operating system (OS), such as Ubuntu (64-bit). Rosetta@Home will not give you any workloads if you try it in Raspbian.

    Here’s how to use your Raspberry Pi to fight coronavirus with BOINC and Rosetta@Home.

  • Compact Apollo Lake computer runs Linux

    WinSystems’ fanless, Linux-ready “SYS-ITX-N-3900” computer has an Apollo Lake SoC, -20 to 60°C support, wide-range power, M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion, and a compact 150 x 150 x 50mm footprint.

    A year and a half after the first Intel Gemini Lake based embedded computers arrived, we have seen only a few models based on this latest Atom family of chips. Gemini Lake continues to be in short supply, as it has been since its arrival.

    Yet, the industry keeps churning out computers based on the similarly 14nm fabricated Apollo Lake platform. The latest is WinSystems’ fanless SYS-ITX-N-3900, which runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake Atom SoCs.

  • i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

    Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support.

    Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

SFP modules on a board running Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

We had to overcome a few challenges to get this setup working, using a mainline Linux kernel.

As we discussed earlier, having SFP modules meant the whole MAC-PHY-SFP link has to be reconfigured at runtime, as the PHY in the SFP module is hot-pluggable. To solve this issue a framework called Phylink, was introduced in mid-2017 to represent networking links and allowing their component to share states and to be reconfigured at runtime. For us, this meant we had to first convert the CPSW MAC driver to use this phylink framework. For a detailed explanation of what composes Ethernet links and why Phylink is needed, we gave a talk at the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in 2018. While we were working on this and after we first moved the CPSW MAC driver to use Phylink, this driver was rewritten and a new CPSW MAC driver was sent upstream (CONFIG_TI_CPSW vs CONFIG_TI_CPSW_SWITCHDEV). We are still using the old driver for now, and this is why we did not send our patches upstream as we think it does not make sense to convert a driver which is now deprecated.

A second challenge was to integrate the 2-wire capability of the VSC8572 PHY into the networking PHY and SFP common code, as our SFP modules I2C bus is connected to the PHY and not an I2C controller from the system-on-chip. We decided to expose this PHY 2-wire capability as an SMBus controller, as the functionality offered by the PHY does not make it a fully I2C compliant controller.

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Devices/Embedded With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Open source near ubiquitous in IoT, report finds

    Open provide is an growing variety of regular working course of in software, nonetheless nowhere is that this more true than Net of Points building. In keeping with a model new VisionMobile survey of three,700 IoT builders, 91% of respondents use open provide software in a minimal of 1 area in their software stack. This is good news for IoT because of best open provide ensures to chop again or put off the potential of lock-in imposed by way of proprietary “necessities.”

    What’s in all chance most attention-grabbing on this affection for open provide, then again, is that concurrently endeavor builders have eschewed the politics of open provide licensing, IoT builders seem to need open provide because of “it’s free as in freedom.”

  • MIOTY Silicon Vendor Agnostic, Scalable LPWAN Standard to Take on LoRaWAN, NB-IoT

    There are plenty of LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Networks) standards designed for low power, low bitrate and long-range connectivity with the most popular currently being NB-IoT and LoRaWAN. But Texas Instruments has joined other smaller companies (Fraunhofer, Ragsol, STACKFORCE, WIKA…) to form the MIOTY alliance in order to develop and promote a new LPWAN standard operating in the sub-GHz range called MIOTY.

  • ESP32-Vaquita-DSPG Board and SDK Support Alexa Integration and AWS IoT Core Cloud Service
  • Rugged embedded PC supports Linux on Apollo Lake

    Nexcom’s rugged, Linux-ready “NISE 108” embedded computer has an Apollo Lake Celeron, triple display support with dual DP, 2x GbE, 4x USB, 3x COM, and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    [...]

    Designed for rugged industrial automation applications in factory, agricultural, and service settings, with special suitability for agro-industrial jobs, the aluminum and metal constructed NISE 108 supports -5 to 55°C operation with ambient air flow. The IEC60068-2-27 compliant shock protection is listed as 20G (HDD) or 50G (SSD) at half-sine, 11ms. Random vibration resistance is rated at 0.5Grms @ 5~500 Hz per IEC60068-2-64 for an HDD and 2Grms with SSD. There’s also 10% to 95% (non-condensing) relative humidity tolerance.

    The NISE 108 supports up to 8GB DDR3L-1866 via a single socket. There’s a 2.5-inch storage bay and an M.2 2242 socket, both with the older SATA 2.0 support. A mini-PCIe slot supports WiFi and cellular connections with the help of dual antenna holes.

Open Hardware: Spaghetti Detective (TSD), OnStep and RISC-V in Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC)

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Spaghetti Detective: Open Source AI Software Detects Prints Gone Wrong

    Desktop 3D printer users are quite familiar with the mishaps of some print job going wrong and extruders spilling material all over their machine while they’re out at the store or soundly sleeping in bed. Being confronted with a printer full of plastic spaghetti when you next go to check on it is one of the most disheartening and frustrating experiences a user can face.

    Attempting to address this issue is the Spaghetti Detective (TSD), a piece of open source artificial intelligence software that automatically interrupts failed prints. The software runs continuously on a computer server and uses a computer or printer’s webcam to monitor the printing process. If it detects a print failure, it automatically pauses the print and alerts the user via text or email. You can then choose to cancel the print and prevent not only a plate of inedible spaghetti from forming, but also the possibility of equipment damage or fire hazard. The Spaghetti Detective can run on an old PC connected to the web or, if you prefer not to rely on the cloud, it’s possible to host the TSD server on a Jetson Nano card from NVIDIA.

  • Open Source Telescope Controller Puts Smart Features In Old Telescopes

    In times like these, we all need to look beyond ourselves. This project might help: OnStep is an open-source telescope controller, a device that controls a telescope to point at something interesting in the sky. Want to take a look at M31? Use an app on a PC or smartphone, select the object and the OnStep will pan and tilt your telescope until the Andromeda Galaxy pops into view.

    [...]

    It is pretty hardware agnostic: the controller can be an Arduino, a Teensy 3 or even an ESP32. The PCB design can work with any of these controllers. The same is true of the motors that move the telescope, so you can build the device from parts that you might have lying around. Many of those who have built OnStep controllers have adapted older telescope mounts that are motorized but aren’t smart. Others have used older mounts and replaced the slow, inaccurate motors with more precise ones that make the telescope more accurate and smooth. The gallery of telescope builds on the OnStep wiki is a great place to start and see examples like this 30-year old Celestron telescope that was brought into the 21st century with a OnStep conversion, or this conversion of a 1960s telescope that adds a smart mount.

  • BSC-Led DRAC Project to Manufacture New Chip, Open Source Accelerators in Barcelona

    If Lagarto, the first open source processor developed in Spain and Mexico, was introduced in December, now DRAC is presented. It is a project to develop a new processor and several open source accelerators. DRAC (Designing RISC-V-based Accelerators for next generation Computers) is a new step in research led by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) to manufacture open source chips from Europe. The project has the collaboration of the Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), the University of Barcelona (UB), the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) and the Rovira i Virgili University (URV).

    The objective of DRAC is to manufacture a processor and several accelerators to be used in security tasks (encryption or protection from attacks against hardware, for example), personalized medicine (especially genomic analysis) and autonomous navigation (cars and other vehicles).

Open Hardware and Devices With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Instaclock | The Magpi 92
  • [Old] BrailleBox: Android Things Braille news display

    To create the six nubs necessary to form Braille symbols, Joe topped solenoids with wooden balls. He then wired them up to GPIO pins of the Pi 3 via a breadboard.

  • Sending my alerts directly to the keyboard

    As I learned while making this blog post, custom drivers are not always the best way to add custom functionality to USB devices on Linux, sometimes there are pre existing APIs that can make adding functionality a lot easier.

    Despite me ending up not using a custom USB driver in the final version, it was still quite interesting to play around with, if for no other reason than I now have another trick up my sleeve for future projects.

    And now thanks to my keyboard, I will never miss alerts again.

  • Onlykey review

    There’s a sort of soft rubber case around the key, you can get all kinds of colors (I just stuck with black). It also comes with the handy little carribeener to attach it to your keychain or whatever.
    So, once you have the firmware somewhat up to date, you can run the app. It will also update firmware as long as it’s not too old. The firmware is open source: https://github.com/trustcrypto/OnlyKey-Firmware
    On your first run (or if you factory wipe it), you have to do a bit of setup. You can enter 2 profile pins (sequences of buttons). They suggest that this might be ‘work’ and ‘home’, but you could use them for whatever you like. You can also enter a ‘self destruct’ profile pin, which wipes back to factory settings if you enter it. You can also tell it to do this if someone enters the wrong pin 10 times, but it will flash red and stop taking input after 3 failed pins. So to wipe it this way you have to enter 3 wrong pins, remove, insert, 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert 3 more wrong pins, remove, insert, 1 more wrong pin. You can also load a firmware called the “International Travel Edition” that has no encryption at all (it’s only protected by the pin).

  • Widora TINY200 Allwinner F1C200s ARM9 Development Board Support DVP Camera, Up to 512MB SD NAND Flash

    Widora TINY200 is a tiny ARM9 development board equipped with Allwinner F1C200s with a DVP camera interface compatible with OV2640 / 5640 sensor, an audio amplifier, and various storage options from a 16MB SPI flash to a 512MB SD NAND flash.

    I first heard about the processor when I wrote about Microchip SAM9X60 ARM9 SoC last month, and some people noted there were other fairly new ARM9 SoCs around such as Allwinner F1C200s that also includes 64MB RAM so you can run Linux without having to connect external memory chips.

  • Librem 5 January 2020 Software Update

    January saw development take off again after the end-of-year break, and following on from the Chestnut shipment of the Librem 5.

    Some of the activities below were already mentioned in their own articles in Purism’s news archive; others will be covered in more depth in future articles. This is just a taste of all the work that goes into making the Librem 5 software stack. You can follow development more closely at source.puri.sm.

  • ESP32-S2-Saola-1 Development Board is Now Available for $8

    Espressif ESP32-S2 WiFi SoC mass production started at the end of February 2020, and soon enough we started to find ESP32-S2 SoC and modules for $1 to $2 on sites like Digikey, but so far we had not seen ESP32-S2 development boards for sale.

    The good news is the breadboard-friendly ESP32-S2-Saola-1 development board has started to show up for $8 on resellers such as Mouser and Digikey albeit with a lead time of 8 to 12 weeks.

Dell XPS Ice Lake Taking A Wallop On Ubuntu 20.04

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Ubuntu

With our early benchmarking of Ubuntu 20.04 in its current nearing the end of development state, we've been seeing Ubuntu 20.04 boosting Intel Xeon Scalable performance, running well with AMD EPYC Rome, and good AMD Ryzen performance, among other tests. Strangely though the one platform where I've found Ubuntu 20.04 hard regressing so far is with the Dell XPS 7390 Ice Lake.

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Linus Torvalds Questions The Not So Glorious Driver For That Funky Looking RGB Mouse

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Linux
Hardware

Last month I noted a new Linux driver for a buggy and funky looking mouse. A special driver was created by a community developer due to not all the mice button working otherwise due to not abiding by HID specifications. Now that the driver was merged for Linux 5.7, Linus Torvalds had words to share on this open-source driver.

The hid-glorious driver is a basic HID Linux driver needed for PC Gaming Race's Glorious mice of at least some different models. Their HID behavior is not following spec resulting in some mouse buttons not working. This isn't some knock-off super cheap mouse either but the Glorious Model O for instance retails for $50 USD.

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More in Tux Machines

Maintaining SUSE Linux support during the pandemic

The global pandemic and resulting government shelter-in-place or quarantine measures to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus have shifted the priorities of IT organizations away from non-critical maintenance and upgrades. Unfortunately, the planned end of General Support date for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12 Service Pack 4 happens to be in the middle of this crisis. At SUSE, we understand the strain the current environment is putting on your IT operations so we have an option to help you keep your systems supported and secure. General Support for SLES 12 SP4 ends on June 30, 2020. Normally, organizations would either upgrade to a SLES service pack/version that still has full support or purchase up to 3 years of Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS). Available today, organizations with current subscriptions of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP4 are eligible to receive continued access to patches and updates in the LTSS repositories free of charge for 3 months starting July 1, 2020, through September 30, 2020. Platforms included in this offer are x86-64 and IBM Z/LinuxOne. This gives IT teams more time to complete upgrade plans and evaluations at a time when staffing is limited and the focus is on keeping the business operational. Read more

Games: Akurra, RimWorld and Space Grunts 2

  • Akurra to support Linux without a stretch-goal on Kickstarter

    Game developer Jason Newman who is currently crowdfunding Akurra, mentioned here on GOL recently, has decided they no longer need a stretch-goal for Linux support. What is Akurra? A retro styled puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Chip's Challenge, Star Tropics, Sokoban, and Zelda. Push blocks into holes and over pits, avoid spikes, explore caves, and ride sea turtles in order to find keys, gems, and stars that unlock new paths and friends to aid you as you explore a collection of islands chock-full of puzzles and secrets.

  • The latest RimWorld update opens up more possible paths

    RimWorld was already a deep game, with so much on offer it's easy to get completely sucked into it and now that's going to be even more possible. With the latest update, the developer mentioned their aim has been to open up RimWorld to more progression paths. Enabling you to take the game in whatever direction tickles your fancy including tribal, outlander, pro-Empire, anti-Empire, neutral Empire, use Psycasters or not, use drugs or not, use ranching or not and whatever else. The point was to have the game AI and world respond sensibly to where you're headed.

  • Space Grunts 2 is a roguelike with card-based combat out now

    Merging together elements of a card-based deckbuilder with a traditional turn-based roguelike, Space Grunts 2 from Orangepixel has now left Early Access. Note: Key provided by the developer. This is the 9th game from Orangepixel to support Linux, and might possibly be my favourite yet! A very easy to get into game, with a satisfying gameplay loop that sees you travel through procedurally generated sci-fi environments with a tight pixel-art style.

Mozilla and Firefox Leftovers

  • Marco Zehe: Welcome to Marco's Accessibility Blog 2.0!

    Well, after 13 years, I felt it was time for something new. Also, as I wrote recently, Mozilla now has a dedicated accessibility blog, so I feel that I am free to do other things with my blog now. As a sign of that, I wanted to migrate it to a new platform. This is not to say the old platform, WordPress, is bad or anything like that. But for my needs, it has become much too heavy-weight in features, and also in the way how it feels when performing day to day tasks. 80% of features it offers are features I don't use. This pertains both to the blog system itself as well as its new block editor. But those features don't get out of the way easily, so over the months and actually last two to three years, I felt that I was moving mountains just to accomplish simple things. It has nothing to do with the steadily improving accessibility, either. That is, as I said, getting better all the time. It just feels heavy-weight to the touch and keyboard when using it.

  • Jeff Klukas: Encoding Usage History in Bit Patterns

    Monthly active users (MAU) is a windowed metric that requires joining data per client across 28 days. Calculating this from individual pings or daily aggregations can be computationally expensive, which motivated creation of the clients_last_seen dataset for desktop Firefox and similar datasets for other applications. A powerful feature of the clients_last_seen methodology is that it doesn’t record specific metrics like MAU and WAU directly, but rather each row stores a history of the discrete days on which a client was active in the past 28 days. We could calculate active users in a 10 day or 25 day window just as efficiently as a 7 day (WAU) or 28 day (MAU) window. But we can also define completely new metrics based on these usage histories, such as various retention definitions.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: WebXR Viewer 2.0 Released

    We are happy to announce that version 2.0 of WebXR Viewer, released today, is the first web browser on iOS to implement the new WebXR Device API, enabling high-performance AR experiences on the web that don't share pictures of your private spaces with third party Javascript libraries and websites. It's been almost a year since the previous release (version 1.17) of our experimental WebXR platform for iOS, and over the past year we've been working on two major changes to the app: (1) we updated the Javascript API to implement the official WebXR Device API specification, and (2) we ported our ARKit-based WebXR implementation from our minimal single-page web browser to the full-featured Firefox for iOS code-base.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Scaling Virtual Events with Hubs and Hubs Cloud

    Virtual events are unique, and each one has varying needs for how many users can be present. In this blog post, we’ll talk about the different ways that you can consider concurrency as part of a virtual event, the current capabilities of Mozilla Hubs and Hubs Cloud for supporting users, and considerations for using Hubs as part of events of varying sizes. If you’ve considered using Hubs for a meetup or conference, or are just generally interested in how the platform works, read on!

  • Extensions in Firefox 77

    Firefox 77 is loaded with great improvements for the WebExtensions API. These additions to the API will help you provide a great experience for your users. Optional Permissions Since Firefox 57, users have been able to see what permissions an extension wants to access during the installation process. The addition of any new permissions to the extension triggers another notification that users must accept during the extension’s next update. If they don’t, they won’t receive the updated version. These notifications were intended to provide transparency about what extensions can do and help users make informed decisions about whether they should complete the installation process. However, we’ve seen that users can feel overwhelmed by repeated prompts. Worse, failure to see and accept new permissions requests for updated versions can leave users stranded on older versions.

  • Moving SUMO Community synchronous communications to Matrix

    As some of you already know, Mozilla has been working for some time to replace its official synchronous communication tool, and earlier this year we decided to launch our own Matrix instance to host our public conversations. In SUMO, we historically maintained a Telegram group to enable synchronous communications, and now we want to transition it to the new Mozilla Matrix.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast and More

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E09 – Breaking mirrors

    This week we’ve been getting older and adding plugins to OBS Studio. We discuss Ubuntu being certified on the Raspberry Pi, Unity Remix, if Microsoft should buy Canonical and WSL getting GUI app support. We also round up our pick from the general tech news.

  • All Good Things | TechSNAP 430

    It's a storage showdown as Jim and Wes bust some performance myths about RAID and ZFS. Plus our favorite features from Fedora 32, and why Wes loves DNF.

  • Episode 11: Advice on Getting Started With Testing in Python

    Have you wanted to get started with testing in Python? Maybe you feel a little nervous about diving in deeper than just confirming your code runs. What are the tools needed and what would be the next steps to level up your Python testing? This week on the show we have Anthony Shaw to discuss his article on this subject. Anthony is a member of the Real Python team and has written several articles for the site. We discuss getting started with built-in Python features for testing and the advantages of a tool like pytest. Anthony talks about his plug-ins for pytest, and we touch on the next level of testing involving continuous integration.