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Hardware

The CompuLab Fitlet Is A Neat Little Linux PC With AMD SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Earlier this year CompuLab announced the Fitlet PC as a tiny, fanless, Linux-friendly PC. The Fitlets are finally starting to ship at scale and recently I received one of the AMD-powered Fitlets that's preloaded with Linux Mint. Here's a quick look at the Fitlet.

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Should I get an Arduino or a Raspberry Pi?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

I spend a lot of time at conferences and events like Maker Faires, and having co-authored a book on the Raspberry Pi, I spend a lot of time talking to people about things like small electronics and open hardware. Probably the most frequent question I hear is, "Should I get a Raspberry Pi or an Arduino?"

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PiSoC Open Source Development Platform Unveiled (video)

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

The PiSoC project is currently over on the Kickstarter crowd funding website looking to raise $15,000 in pledges to make the jump from concept to production.

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Mouser adds to open source board sales channel

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The distributor’s Open Source Hardware Technology website now has an updated product selector which allows users to select a board from 30 different parameters including processor type and speed, memory and expansion capabilities, wireless and wired networking, user interface options, video connectivity.

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MintBox Mini Preview

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Hardware

I’d like to thank CompuLab for sending the development team three MintBox Mini. I just received mine Smile

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Intel, Qualcomm, Broadcom firms join MIPS open-source push

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
OSS

Qualcomm Atheros, Lantiq (part of Intel) and Broadcom have appointed representatives to the board of the Prpl (‘purple’) Foundation, organisation set-up by Imagination Technologies to support open-source software on the MIPS architecture.

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Entroware Announces Aura, a Tiny PC That Runs Ubuntu or Ubuntu MATE 15.04

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Entroware introduced today, May 2, their first mini-PC called Aura and powered by Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet) computer operating system, or the popular Ubuntu MATE 15.04 flavor.

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How to get involved with the Open Source Hardware Association

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Hardware
OSS

Back in October of 2014, I was lucky enough to be elected to the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) board. Because the association received its nonprofit status, the board is finally able to begin increasing its reach in the community. Many new initiatives are being discussed, and we've been collecting a lot of community input on what is needed in the open source hardware world. One of the main objectives the board has in mind for the next year is to continue building up the community interaction and awareness of the association.

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Linux Audio Is Being Further Modernized With The 4.1 Kernel

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Hardware

Takashi Iwai sent in his sound driver updates for Linux 4.1, which includes major modernization with the standard bus for ALSA in the sequencer core and HD-audio code.

This sound/audio updates also include the HD-audio code now supporting regmap to replace their in-house register cache code, a split of HD-audio into a core library and "legacy" driver portions, in preparation for the upcoming ASoC HD-audio driver.

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Cirrus7 nimbini Is a Goergeous Mini-PC Built from Layers of Aluminium, Ships with Ubuntu

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Hardware
Ubuntu

As it stands right now, it will also feature Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Ubuntu 15.04, but a Windows options is also provided.

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today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver