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Hardware

Coreboot Keeps Getting Better Bay Trail Support

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Hardware

Coreboot for Intel's low-power Bay Trail platform is a basic DPTF framework. The DPTF framework for Bay Trail isn't yet complete but is nearly working. DPTF is the Dynamic Platform and Thermal Framework designed for "thin, quiet, and cool platform designs." As explained at 01.org, "Intel DPTF provides mechanisms for platform components and devices to be exposed to individual technologies in a consistent and modular fashion thus enabling a coordinated control of the platform to achieve the power and thermal management goals."

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3D Printing's Success Points to a Rosy Future for Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

It's no secret that open source has shaken up the software world, not least for the savings it's brought both organizations and consumers. Now it's starting to look like open source hardware could have a similar, game-changing effect.

Though still nowhere near as ubiquitous as FOSS, open hardware is gaining ground rapidly -- especially with the booming popularity of open source 3D printing -- and some very compelling benefits are becoming clear.

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AMD surprise: pin-compatible ARM and x86 CPUs

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Linux
Hardware

In conjunction with its Project Skybridge and K2 announcement, AMD said that today it “demonstrated for the first time its 64-bit ARM-based AMD Opteron A-Series processor, codenamed ‘Seattle,’ running a Linux environment derived from the Fedora Project.” The Fedora-based Linux environment is said to enable development — and migration between — applications based on both x86- and ARM-based processors using common tools.

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DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport Starts Working On Linux

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Hardware

David has now posted working patches for his DP MST code on the DRI-devel mailing list. Right now his code has just been tested on a Lenovo Ultrabook boasting Intel "Haswell" graphics and it's working when connected to external hubs. There's still code that's a work in progress but overall it seems to be working fine. Right now this initial "preview code" works for Intel Haswell hardware with certain DP MST hubs.

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No, ARM Didn't Open-Source Their Full Mali Linux Driver

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Linux
Hardware

A few links have been sent in to our news tip box with this page, which reads, "Open Source Mali-200/300/400/450 GPU Kernel Device Drivers." While the page mentions open-source drivers, it's only about the kernel portion of the driver and it's always been that way with ARM -- and most other ARM-based graphics vendors. The kernel portion is open, the user-space components are closed. Without an open user-space, having an open kernel driver is only of limited use, and will not be accepted into the upstream Linux kernel.

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AMD Publishes Open-Source Graphics Code For Mullins & Beema

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
OSS

AMD rolled out the Beema and Mullins hardware yesterday. The AMD "Beema" APUs are targeted for mobile products like notebook PCs while AMD Mullins APUs are low-power processors for ultra low-powered devices. The low-end Mullins APUs sport Radeon R2/R3 Graphics. The AMD Mullins APUs include the A10 Micro-6700T, A4 Micro-6400T, and E1 Micro-6200Tl. The Beema APUs include the E2-6010, E2-6110, A4-6210, and A6-6310. The Mullins models top out at 4.5 Watts while the Beema APUs top out at 15 Watts.

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World's First Open Source Laptop Gets Wideband Software-Defined Radio

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Linux
Hardware

When Bunnie Huang firstannounced the Novena laptopback in December 2012 it was like an early Christmas present to hackers the world over. This was true even though there was only a suggestion that, given sufficient demand, a limited number maybe made available.

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AMD Shows Off Beema & Mullins But Its Linux Fate Is Unclear

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Linux
Hardware

AMD has now revealed their newest APUs, codenamed "Beema" and "Mullins" while their Linux fate remains unclear.

The AMD "Beema" APUs are targeted for mobile products like notebook PCs while AMD Mullin APUs are low-power processors for ultra low-powered devices. The low-end Mullin APUs sport Radeon R2/R3 Graphics.

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xf86-video-modesetting Now Supports Server-Managed FDs

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

The generic xf86-video-modesetting DDX driver that's designed to work universally across Linux KMS drivers now has support for sever-managed file-descriptors, which will help this driver work on non-root X Servers.

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Raspberry Pi Clones Match the Connectors, But Boost the Firepower

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Hardware
OSS

Ever since the Raspberry Pi burst onto the scene in 2012, open source hardware projects have been promoting their Linux-ready hacker boards as offering faster, more capable alternatives. Considering the Pi's 700MHz ARM11 processor and relatively modest feature set, that's not such a stretch, but matching the $35 price is another story. If you can't match the price, what you really need to get the attention of Pi-lovers looking for a bit more oomph is to look and act like a Pi.

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Firefox OS media-casting stick strikes Kickstarter gold

The first Firefox OS based media player has arrived on Kickstarter, in the form of a $25 open-spec HDMI stick that supports Chromecast-like content casting. The Matchstick, which has already zoomed past its Kickstarter campaign’s $100,000 funding goal, with 28 days still remaining, was teased back in June by Mozilla developer evangelist Christian Heilmann. The unnamed prototype was billed as an open source HDMI stick that runs Mozilla’s Linux-based Firefox OS and offers casting capabilities. Few details were revealed at the time except that the device used the same DIAL (DIscovery And Launch) media-casting protocol created by Netflix and popularized by Google’s Chromecast. Read more

Open source history, present day, and licensing

Looking at open source softwares particularly, this is a fact that is probably useful to you if you are thinking about business models, many people don't care about it anymore. We talk about FOSS, Free and Open Source Software, but if we really are strict there's a difference between free software and open source software. On the left, I have free software which most typically is GPL software. Software where the license insures freedom. It gives freedoms to you as a user, but it also requires that the freedoms are maintained. On the right-hand side, you have open source software which is open for all, but it also allows you to close it. So here we come back to the famous clause of the GPL license, the reciprocity requirement which says, "If I am open, you need to be open." So software that comes under the GPL license carries with it something that other people call a virus. I call it a blessing because I think it's great if all software becomes open. Read more

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