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Hardware

Hardware/Linux

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Android
Linux
Hardware

Hardware Modding/Hacking/Security

Filed under
Hardware
Security
  • Libreboot on my X60s
  • Nexenta to Showcase Market Leading Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage Solutions at Cloud Expo Europe, London
  • Cybersecurity education isn't good, nobody is shocked

    There was a news story published last week about the almost total lack of cybersecurity attention in undergraduate education. Most people in the security industry won't be surprised by this. In the majority of cases when the security folks have to talk to developers, there is a clear lack of understanding about security.

  • Making it easier to deploy TPMTOTP on non-EFI systems

    On EFI systems you can handle this by sticking the secret in an EFI variable (there's some special-casing in the code to deal with the additional metadata on the front of things you read out of efivarfs). But that's not terribly useful if you're not on an EFI system. Thankfully, there's a way around this. TPMs have a small quantity of nvram built into them, so we can stick the secret there. If you pass the -n argument to sealdata, that'll happen. The unseal apps will attempt to pull the secret out of nvram before falling back to looking for a file, so things should just magically work.

  • 6 steps to calculate ROI for an open hardware project

    Free and open source software advocates have courageously blazed a trail that is now being followed by those interested in open source for physical objects. It's called free and open source hardware (FOSH), and we're seeing an exponential rise in the number of free designs for hardware released under opensource licenses, Creative Commons licenses,or placed in the public domain.

An open source microprocessor for wearables

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Hardware
OSS

Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • First Open Source GPU Could Change Future of Computing

    Nyami is significant in the research, computing and open source communities because it marks the first time open source has been used to design a GPU, as well as the first time a research team was able to test how different hardware and software configurations affect GPU performance. The results of the experiments the researchers performed are now part of the open source community, and that work will help others follow in the original research team’s footsteps. According to Timothy Miller, a computer science assistant professor at Binghamton, as others create their own GPUs using open source, it will push computing power to the next level.

  • We are happy to share our FREE and OPEN-SOURCE microprocessor system PULPino!

    Not a toy design: PULPino is a mature design: it has been taped-out as an ASIC in UMC 65nm in January 2016. The PULPino platform is available for RTL simulation as well for FPGA mapping. It has full debug support on all targets. In addition we support extended profiling with source code annotated execution times through KCacheGrind in RTL simulations.

    And it is free, no registration, no strings attached, you can use it, change it, adapt it, add to your own chip, use it for classes, research, projects, products… We just ask you to acknowledge the source, and if possible, let us know what you like and what you like and don’t like.

  • Wiring was Arduino before Arduino

    Hernando Barragán is the grandfather of Arduino of whom you’ve never heard. And after years now of being basically silent on the issue of attribution, he’s decided to get some of his grudges off his chest and clear the air around Wiring and Arduino. It’s a long read, and at times a little bitter, but if you’ve been following the development of the Arduino vs Arduino debacle, it’s an important piece in the puzzle.

Hardware Modding/Hacking

Filed under
Hardware
  • Open Source Hardware is an opportunity for Synthetic Biology research – the DocuBricks approach by Tobias Wenzel

    There is a lesson to be learned from the incompleteness of commercial assembly-set documentations: Open Source Hardware is more than an assembly instruction. It is also about documenting design files and decisions along its functionality and in a modular fashion, complete with testing and calibration instructions. A good documentation enables the project to grow and improve without the doing of the inventor. Only in this way most projects can enfold their benefit well to society and technology companies. To be sure, documenting a hardware project is not easy and requires time. For this reason a handful scientists at the University of Cambridge (including the author), all with a background in technology and biology, recently started the DocuBricks initiative. DocuBricks is an open source and free software that makes documenting hardware and usage procedures easier. The name is a reference to modularity in the same way as Lego or BioBricks. As the name suggests, the editor part of the software guides the user through a modular documentation structure with relevant fields in a standardised, yet general format. The user can create a hierarchy of documentation bricks, explaining their function, implementation and assembly while referring to a parts library. The result is a XML document and a folder with construction and media files that is displayed with the viewer part of the software (a style sheet and script to enable interactivity).

  • Kicad hacking - Intra-sheet links and ERC

    I spent time looking at gEDA and Eagle when I wanted to get back into hardware hacking for my own ends; but neither did I really click with. On the other hand, a mere 10 minutes with Kicad and I knew I had found the tool I wanted to work with long-term.

  • Open-Source System 3D Prints from Custom Powders

    An open-source laser sintering printer has been used to print intricate 3D objects from powdered plastics and biomaterials. The system costs a fraction of equivalent commercial systems and could give researchers a DIY technique for working with their own specialized materials.

Raspberry Pi 3 Debut

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi 3 on sale now at $35

    Exactly four years ago, on 29 February 2012, we unleashed the original 256MB Raspberry Pi Model B on a largely unsuspecting world. Since then, we’ve shipped over eight million units, including three million units of Raspberry Pi 2, making us the UK’s all-time best-selling computer. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has grown from a handful of volunteers to have over sixty full-time employees, including our new friends from Code Club. We’ve sent a Raspberry Pi to the International Space Station and are training teachers around the world through our Picademy program.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, 64-bit chip, still just $35

    The third major version of the Raspberry Pi will go on sale Monday, with the $35/£30 credit card-sized Raspberry Pi 3 Model B now sporting a 64-bit processor and embedded Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

    In previous versions, the Pi needed USB adapters to get Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Raspberry Pi 3 supports 802.11n Wi-Fi (2.4GHz only) and Bluetooth 4.0 without an adapter, freeing up its four USB ports for other purposes.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 with 64-bit quad-core SoC, built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth announced for $35

    Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.

AMD/Intel on Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

C.H.I.P. and Raspberry Pi 2

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • C.H.I.P. – Not A Replacement For Beast, But A Useful Controller Board

    I’ve been looking for an ARMed replacement for Beast’s power-sucking/fanfull/large corpse. This isn’t it. It is a very well documented controller that ships with a minimal installation of Debian GNU/Linux complete with GUI. I could, for instance, use this thing to make a pulsewidth modulator for a power supply. It’s obviously overkill for such a task but at the advertised price, $9, it’s OK.

  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with new Raspberry Pi 2 rival

    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel's Odroid-C2 computer.

    The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenShot 2.2 Offers Free, Open Source Pro Editing for 4K and 5K Videos
    4K ultra HD resolution is without a doubt now at least the mainstream near future standard for digital recording, content and display resolution and we don’t expect this to change for at least a few years. The majority of new larger 50 inch+ TVs going on sale today are 4K models, 4K monitors are becoming much more common and now virtually all mid-range to premium digital recording cameras offer ultra HD resolution of at least [email protected] x 2160 pixels and in many cases even higher.
  • Google Drive CLI Client For Linux
    Google Drive is one of the most popular services to store your files in the cloud. You can access to your Google Drive account through a web browser or using a client. This time I’m going to talk about one Google Drive client but without graphical interface, in this tutorial you’re going to know how to use a client through the command line interface to access, download and upload to your google drive.
  • Calligra 3.0 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Krita and Author Out
    After a long time in development, Calligra, the open-source office suite designed for KDE Plasma desktops, makes a comeback in 2017 with the release of the 3.0 milestone. While many GNU/Linux users were able to download and install the new Calligra 3.0 office suite from the official channels of the project or the stable software repositories of their favorite GNU/Linux distribution since last week, an official announcement was published earlier this week.
  • Free Software Foundation Makes ‘Major Overhaul’ In High Priority Projects
    Coolness alert! The Free Software Foundation has announced an updated list of high priority projects on a global scale. Top priorities now include a free software phone operating system, clouds, hardware, voice and video chat, inclusiveness, security and internationalisation of free software. The announcement is available here. It includes a link to the new list. The update followed feedback from about 150 free software community members over the past year. FSF isn’t seeking to run or control the projects, but will encourage them whether they are under their auspices or not, they said.
  • GNU Screen v.4.5.0
    I’m proud to announce the release of GNU Screen v.4.5. This time it’s mostly a bugfix release. We added just one new feature: now it’s possible to specify logfile name by using parameter -L (default name stays screenlog.0). Myself also spent some time to make source code a bit cleaner. As you probably noticed we were going to release 4.5 until Christmas. Unfortunately, we could not do it because of some internal GNU problems. I’m very apologise for that.

OSS Leftovers

  • Why 2017 Will Bring Cheer for Open Source Enthusiasts
    A few years ago, open source was the less-glamourous and low-cost alternative in the enterprise world, and no one would have taken the trouble to predict what its future could look like. Fast-forward to 2016, many of us will be amazed by how open source has become the de facto standard for nearly everything inside an enterprise. Open source today is the primary engine for innovation and business transformation. Cost is probably the last reason for an organisation to go in for open source. An exclusive market study conducted by North Bridge and Black Duck brought some fascinating statistics a few months ago. In the study titled “Future of Open Source”, about 90 percent of surveyed organisations said that open source improves efficiency, interoperability and innovation. What is even more significant is the finding that the adoption of open source for production environments outpaced the proprietary software for the first time – more than 55 percent leverage OSS for production infrastructure.
  • Five ways open source accelerates IoT
    Just having seen Passengers in the theater the other night, I reflected on how soon we might see a self-piloted space vessel like this transporting passengers through deep space. This incredible film features a spacecraft that is a work of IoT art, where things interact with one another to manage some of the harshest conditions imaginable. As an advocate for open source software and the innovation derived from its collaborative development methodology, I have a deep interest in how the journey to an IoT where a future like this is possible can benefit from open source solutions. I would even argue that the acceptance of open source methodologies has helped IoT gain momentum, capture mindshare and quickly deliver real results.
  • How to gain confidence to participate in open source
    As your brain develops, you learn about what you can and should do in the world, and what you can't and shouldn't. Your actions are influenced by surroundings and norms, and many times what keeps you from participating is a lack of self-confidence.

Debian Isn't Difficult, Fedora Elections Winners, Fav Distro

Prospective users still avoid Debian initially because it's difficult to install, or so they believe. It turns out they're not basing their opinions on real life. Keith Curtis wrote up his experience installing Arch on his new Lenovo laptop, after a fairly complete hardware review as well. Jamie Watson got a new notebook too and today shared a bit on getting it ready for Linux. Part of that was booting Mint 18.1 which gave him something to smile about. Elsewhere, the Fedora committee elections results are in and Dominique Leuenberger posted a review of this week in Tumbleweed. Gary Newell test drove Elementary OS 0.4 and OpenSource.com asked, "What is your favorite Linux distribution?" Read more

Games for GNU/Linux