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Hardware

Review of the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd

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Hardware
Reviews
SUSE

Would I recommend the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd? To be honest, its a mixed bag on openSUSE. Installation of openSUSE Leap 15.2 was very easy. And installation of a dual boot system with Windows 10 was easy as well. The laptop has an attractive look and feel. The display, speakers, keyboard and external ports are all good. The touchpad is too sensitive. The machine has enough RAM, enough storage and the hard drives are performant. The Intel CPU/GPU is great. Which means that this is a great machine for multitasking. The gaming performance on the Intel GPU on openSUSE Leap 15.2 is good enough to play various open source games on medium/high settings.

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Linux-Friendly Devices

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

CutiePi tablet based on Raspberry Pi CM3+ starts at $169

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

On Kickstarter: a $169 and up, open source “CutiePi” tablet that runs a Linux- and Qt-based stack on a quad-core, 1.2GHz Raspberry Pi CM3+ Lite. You also get an 8-inch, 1280 x 800 touchsceen, a 5000mAh battery, and USB and micro-HDMI ports.

Taiwanese startup CutiePi, Which has been teasing details about its Raspberry Pi Compute Module based CutiePi tablet since last August, will go live on Kickstarter on Tuesday. The 8-inch tablet starts at a super early bird price of $169 and features a CutiePi UI shell based on Qt and Raspberry Pi OS (the latest version of Raspbian). The tablet is OSHWA-certified for open source hardware compliance and will also be available in a PCB-only package.

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Now firmware can depend on available client features

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Linux
Hardware

At the moment we just blindly assume the capabilities of the front-end client when installing firmware. We can somewhat work around this limitation by requiring a new enough fwupd daemon version, but the GUI client software may be much older than the fwupd version or just incomplete. If you maintain a text or graphical client that uses fwupd to deploy updates then there’s an additional API call I’d like you to start using so we can fix this limitation.

This would allow, for instance, the firmware to specify that it requires the client to be able to show a runtime detach image. This would not be set by a dumb command line tool using FwupdClient, but would be set by a GUI client that is capable of downloading a URL and showing a PNG to the user.

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Also: LVFS Serves Up Over 17 Million Firmware Files To Linux Users

MontaVista adds continuous integration support

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Hardware

MontaVista announced v3.1 of its Carrier Grade eXpress 3.1 embedded Linux distro based on Linux 5.4 LTS and Yocto 3.1 LTS. CGX 3.1 improves support for CI/CD and is more closely aligned with the Yocto Project.

MontaVista Software has upgraded its Yocto Project based Carrier Grade eXpress to version 3.1 with a focus on Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) support. The pioneering embedded Linux firm also announced greater alignment with the Yocto Project development model and vowed increased support for MontaVista’s free, completely open source OpenCGX version.

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Also: Tiny NanoPi NEO3 SBC Targets Networked Storage with GbE and USB 3.0

Linux in Devices/Embedded: Bootlin, Texas Instruments and Garmin

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Linux
Hardware
  • Bootlin at the Embedded Linux Conference 2020

    Bootlin has been a participant at the Embedded Linux Conference for many years, and despite the special conditions this year, we will again be participating to this online event, from June 29 to July 1.

  • J721E DRA829/TDA4VM/AM752x – Texas Instruments Cortex-A72 based Monster SoC’s

    Texas Instruments unveiled their first 64-bit processor in 2018 with TI AM654 “Keystone III” quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 + dual lockstep Cortex-R5F processor designed for general embedded and industrial applications.

    The company is now working on a more powerful processor with J721E SoC with Cortex-A72 cores belonging to the K3 Multicore SoC architecture platform appearing in TI Linux git repository. Ti J721E is a monster of an SoC, not necessarily in terms of CPU processing power, but it has an amazing amount of features and peripherals.

  • OpenStreetMap for Garmin Fenix

    I’ve recently bought a Garmin Fenix Multisport Smartwatch. The watch offers support for navigation and maps. By default it came with some topo maps for Europe. However I wanted to use more detailed maps from OpenStreetMap.

    [...]

    Also there had been problems with the map on fenix. The draw order really matters and I needed to draw forests earlier as they didn’t show up on smartwatch, but worked fine when loaded in QMapShack. My current problem is that building aren’t rendered on the device. The question is if we really want them or leave them out.

    [...]

    Just download the file and copy it to the GARMIN folder on the device using MTP. In case you want a map for your region you can build it yourself using the MDE.

Open Firmware at System76

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • System76 Oryx Pro Linux laptop gets Intel Core i7-10875H CPU and Open Firmware

    We recently told you that the thin and light Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition has finally started shipping with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. While that is certainly cool, the reality is, Linux-focused companies like System76 were shipping out computers with the newest Ubuntu LTS pre-installed way before that. In fact, System76 even offers the option of its own operating system that is based on Ubuntu 20.04. Called "Pop!_OS," the Linux distribution adds many beneficial tweaks and enhancements to improve the overall user experience.

    Today, System76 refreshes its popular Oryx Pro laptop, and you can choose between Ubuntu 20.04 and Pop!_OS 20.04 (I would recommend the latter). The powerful notebook (with 15.6-inch or 17.3-inch display options) now comes with a cutting-edge 10th Gen Intel Core i7-10875H CPU which offers an impressive 8 cores and 16 threads. You also get an NVIDIA RTX 20-series GPU which can work in conjunction with the Intel graphics thanks to the smart graphic-switching capabilities baked into Pop!_OS.

  • Oryx Pro is the first System76 laptop with Coreboot, Open Controller Firmware and NVIDIA

    System76 have today revealed a refreshed Oryx Pro laptop. The first to come from System76 that features both their System76 Open Firmware, System76 Embedded Controller Firmware and NVIDIA together. This was hinted at recently, when System76 engineer Jeremy Soller had mentioned they were working on it on Twitter.

    Quite an exciting development, having a top Linux hardware vendor bring open source firmware that's built from coreboot and the EDK boot-loader to more models and with an NVIDIA GPU too so there's plenty of power involved. System76 said it "means that users get lightning fast boot times, enhanced security, and firmware updates accessible through their operating system" plus "open source firmware gives a look inside the
    code, so users can keep track of what’s happening with their data".

Devices/Embedded: MontaVista, Silicon Labs, Bamboo Systems

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • MontaVista Launches Carrier Grade eXpress (CGX) 3.1 and Steps Up Yocto Alignment

    MontaVista® Software, LLC,, a leader in commercial Embedded Linux® products and services, today announced the availability of MontaVista's Carrier Grade eXpress (CGX) 3.1 in Q3 of 2020. The CGX 3.1 release will include the baseline of components from Yocto 3.1, commercialized by MontaVista's Carrier-Grade build and test infrastructure.

  • $99 EFR32xG22 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit Offers Low-Cost Zigbee Development Platform

    Silicon Labs has just launched a low-cost Bluetooth, Zigbee, and proprietary wireless development kit with the $99 EFR32xG22 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit (WSTK).

    This WSTK includes two +6 dBm radio boards, matching network, and PCB antennas for +6 dBm output power in the 2.4 GHz band, as well as on-board J-Link debugger. Previously you had to purchase the $479 EFR32xG21 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit to get access to the Zigbee SDK in order to get started with development, and the new starter kit makes it possible to get access to the same software resources and documentation for around $100.

  • Bamboo Systems B1000N 1U Server Features up to 128 64-bit Arm Cores, 512GB RAM

    SolidRun CEx7-LX2160A COM Express module with NXP LX2160A 16-core Arm Cortex A72 processor has been found in the company’s Janux GS31 Edge AI server in combination with several Gyrfalcon AI accelerators. But now another company – Bamboo Systems – has now launched its own servers based on up to eight CEx7-LX2160A module providing 128 Arm Cortex-A72 cores, support for up to 512GB DDR4 ECC, up to 64TB NVMe SSD storage, and delivering a maximum of 160Gb/s network bandwidth in a single rack unit.

    [...]

    B1008N costs about $80,000 to operate over 3 years, against around $155,000 for the AWS and over $250,000 for the Intel Xeon servers. The server costs are quite straightforward as it’s the one-time cost of the hardware or AWS subscriptions over three years. Bamboo Systems explains B1008N network costs are 50% less than Intel as traffic is contained within the system thanks to the built-in Layer 3 switches. However, I don’t understand the higher storage costs for the Intel servers.

  • ZOTAC ZBOX CI622 Nano Barebone, Fanless Comet Lake Mini PC Launched for $400

    The mini PC ships with a WiFi antenna, a 65W power adapter, a VESA mount, a USB flash drive with OS drivers, a warranty card, a user manual, and a quick install guide. There’s no OS since the system is barebone meaning you’d have to buy RAM and storage separately, then install your own preferred operating system. The company only lists Windows 10 as being supported, so Linux would have to be tested first.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi, CHUWI LarkBox and More

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Hardware
  • Raspberry PI Remote Management and Access Tools

    Raspberry PI can be managed remotely from your local network or from internet (if you have control with your router and a public IP address from your internet provider.

    In this article I’ll list a number of ways and tools to access it for different needs. It will be separated in Raspberry PI OS Lite installation and Raspberry PI OS Desktop installation (last one adding to Lite more graphical ways). Also a final section on Smartphone access is included.

    Every remote management tool will need that your get IP address to contact your Raspberry PI. For local area network management, you simply need your Raspberry PI local IP address (with ifconfig command from RPI terminal or identifying it from your router. Internet remote management will also require your external IP address from your router or from a browser inside local network and online services like whatismyip.com

  • CHUWI LarkBox, the World’s Smallest 4K Mini PC, Launched on Indiegogo for $149 and Up
  • Tiny, Linux-ready Gemini Lake mini-PC starts at $155

    CHUWI has launched a 61 x 61 x 43mm “LarkBox” mini-PC on Indiegogo that runs Linux or Win 10 on Intel’s Gemini Lake with prices starting at $155 with 6GB LPDDR4, 128GB eMMC, an M.2 for an SSD, WiFi/BT, 2x USB 3.0, and a 4K-ready HDMI 2.0 port.

    Shenzhen, China based CHUWI has blown past its $25.8K Indiegogo goal for its much hyped LarkBox mini-PC, pulling in over a quarter million dollars so far. Billed as the world’s smallest 4K mini-PC, the 61 x 61 43mm, 127-gram device is designed as a desktop replacement and home theater system, as well as a platform for Point of Sale (POS), digital signage, kiosks, presentations, and CCTV applications. A $155 Early Bird package is still left, with pricing moving to $169. Shipments are due in August.

  • Thin Mini-ITX duo includes Coffee Lake and Whiskey Lake models

    Win Enterprises has unveiled a pair of Linux-ready thin Mini-ITX boards with 2x GbE and 4x USB 3.1 Gen2 ports: the Gen Coffee lake “MB-50050” with 4x serial I/Os and the Whiskey Lake powered “MB-50040” with up to 64GB RAM and optional 9-36V power.

    Win Enterprises has announced two new thin Mini-ITX boards aimed at industrial applications. Like the company’s larger MB-50030 industrial ATX board and a recent full-height MB-50070 Mini-ITX, the MB-50050 supports Intel’s 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. The MB-50040 instead taps the more power-efficient, 15W TDP 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE platform.

  • Up2stream Mini & Pro v3 Audio Boards Add Bluetooth 5.0, USB Sound Card Mode and More

    The first version of the board was powered by a MediaTek MT7688AN MIPS processor coupled with 64MB RAM and 16MB flash, but I’m not sure that’s the case. The company does not advertise this part, as the boards are designed for people wanting to create their own DIY speakers, not necessarily wanting to mess with complex audio codec. For that reason, AFAIK, the source code won’t be released.

  • Sipeed TANG Hex is a Low-Cost Xilinx Zynq-7020 Arm FPGA Board

    Last year, Sipeed launched a $5 FPGA board called Sipeed Tang and based on an entry-level Gowin GW1N-1-LV FPGA. But I had not noticed the company had also worked on a more powerful, yet still low-cost Xilinx Zynq-7020 board in a business card form factor not too dissimilar from the Raspberry Pi model B form factor. Meet Sipeed TANG Hex.

Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi and Trace Together (Singapore) Token

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Hardware
  • Customize your Raspberry Pi operating system for everyday use

    If you have a Raspberry Pi running Raspberry Pi OS (previously known as Raspbian) operating system, you know it's an awesome little computer with a great operating system for beginners that includes just about everything you could possibly want. However, once you become familiar with the Pi and want to start using it for other things, you might want an operating system (OS) that doesn't include everything in the default build.

    When that happens, you have two choices: You can pull your hair out trying to uninstall all the cruft you don't want, or you can use Raspberry Pi OS Lite to build your own custom, lightweight operating system tailored to your exact specs. I suggest saving yourself some time and aggravation and going with the latter option.

  • Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera powers up homemade microscope
  • New product Monday: pi3hat

    This board breaks out 4x 5Mbps CAN-FD ports, 1 low speed CAN port, a 1kHz IMU and a port for a nrf24l01. Despite its name, it works just fine with the Rasbperry Pi 4 in addition to the 3b+ I have tested with mostly to date. I also have a new user-space library for interfacing with it that I will document in some upcoming posts. That library makes it pretty easy to use in a variety of applications.

  • Trace Together Token: Teardown and Design Overview

    On 19 June, GovTech Singapore invited four members of the community to come and inspect their new TraceTogether Token. This token removes the need to carry a phone at all times, and is designed to help both those who do not have a smart device capable of running TraceTogether well, including those using older Android devices, non-smartphones, and iOS users. I was among the group, which also consisted of Roland Turner, Harish Pillay, and Andrew "bunnie" Huang, who were given the opportunity to see the first public revision of hardware. In this post I will discuss the goal of the token, give some overview of the hardware, compare it with the app version of TraceTogether, and comment on the protocol changes.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice 6.4.5 Released with over 100 Bug Fixes, Now Ready for Enterprise Deployments

LibreOffice 6.4.5 comes one and a half months after LibreOffice 6.4.4 and it’s packed with lots of bug fixes across all core components. A total of 106 bugs have been addressed in this new point release, as documented here and here. But, the good news that I would like to share with you today is that the LibreOffice 6.4 office suite series is now finally ready for enterprise deployments in production environments as it’s thoroughly tested and includes several months of bug fixes. Those of you using the LibreOffice 6.3 office suite series in enterprise environments should upgrade to LibreOffice 6.4.5 as soon as possible. You can download the latest release for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms right now from the official website. Read more

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Will Reach End of Life on July 17th, 2020

Launched last year on October 17th, Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) shipped with the Linux 5.3 kernel series, the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment, initial support for ZFS as the root file system via the installer, support for DLNA sharing, WPA3 support, as well as Yaru light and dark themes. Since it’s not an LTS (Long Term Support) release, Ubuntu 19.10 was mainly a testbed for Canonical to try new features. This also translates to the release not having any major changes and receiving only 9 months of support. Therefore, on July 17th, 2020, Canonical will no longer support Ubuntu 19.10. This means that they will cease to provide software updates and security fixes for the distribution. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Getting started on your SAP HANA journey with RHEL 8 for SAP Solutions

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8, which was released at the Red Hat Summit in May 2019, can provide significant performance improvements across a range of modern workloads.  As of March 31, 2020, SAP officially announced the support for SAP HANA 2.0 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 for SAP Solutions on Intel 64 and IBM POWER9 architectures.  With this offering, SAP HANA is fully certified and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 for SAP Solutions as documented in SAP notes 2777782 and 2235581. Beyond the benefits provided by the latest version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, RHEL 8 for SAP Solutions offers the following components...

  • CI/CD with OpenShift
  • Red Hat Audit to ‘Eradicate’ Problematic Language in Its Code

    Red Hat has become the latest software company pledging to remove "problematic" language from its platforms. In a blog post published to the company’s website, Chief Technology Officer Chris Wright said the company would be “standing up a team to audit our own work—our code, documentation and content—and identify potentially divisive language.” “When we looked at why certain words are still being used in open source, we questioned why they persisted and what we could do about it,” Wright told Motherboard in an email.        

  •         
  • System Configuration Proc File System
  • Install VirtualBox 6.1 on Oracle Linux 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6.1 Extension Pack on Oracle Linux 8
  • An Easy Introduction to Open Source Projects

    So what is an open source project anyway? It seems like the answer should be easy. “It's openly available code,” right? Well, not necessarily. It all depends on how the project is licensed. A license tells other people what they can and cannot do with a project. A project like Unity is openly available but its license states it’s only available for reference, not for modification or redistribution. Other projects are openly available but have no license at all. According to copyright law, this means the project is automatically all rights reserved, meaning it’s illegal to do anything at all with the project without the author’s express permission. Neither of these examples are open source projects, because neither of them are licensed in a way that’s in accordance with the Open Source Definition (OSD). This is a set of 10 requirements that a project must meet to be considered “open source.” If a project doesn’t meet each one of those 10 requirements, it violates the OSD and, by definition, is not an open source project. The easiest way to make sure a project is actually open source is to look at the license under which it’s released. If it’s an Open Source Initiative-approved license, then you're guaranteed that the project meets all 10 of the requirements of the OSD and is definitely an open source project. That’s because the Open Source Initiative (OSI), the standards body that maintains and protects the OSD, has reviewed those licenses and confirmed that any project that uses one of them will provide the 10 requirements of the OSD. Projects that use a different non-approved license or no license at all cannot be guaranteed to be open source and may be risky or even illegal to use. Some popular OSI-approved licenses include GNU General Public License GPL, Apache License 2.0, MIT license, and the suite of Creative Commons licenses. [...] Some people contribute because they believe in the Four Freedoms and the power that these freedoms have to foster equality and equity for all people. Whatever reasons you have for wanting to contribute, always remember that’s exactly what those reasons are: yours. No one else will have the same needs, goals, or constraints. Your reasons are unique and personal.

  • We don't really own the digital possessions that we buy online

    The popularity of access-based consumption has obscured the rise of a range of fragmented ownership configurations in the digital realm. These provide the customer with an illusion of ownership while restricting their ownership rights. Companies such as Microsoft and Apple present consumers with the option to “buy” digital products such as eBooks. Consumers often make the understandable assumption that they will have full ownership rights over the products that they pay for, just as they have full ownership rights over the physical books that they buy from their local bookstore.

    However, many of these products are subject to end user licence agreements which set out a more complex distribution of ownership rights. These long legal agreements are rarely read by consumers when it comes to products and services online. And even if they do read them, they are unlikely to fully understand the terms.

    When purchasing eBooks, the consumer often actually purchases a non-transferable licence to consume the eBook in restricted ways. For instance, they may not be permitted to pass the eBook on to a friend once they have finished reading, as they might do with a physical book. Also, as we have seen in the case of Microsoft, the company retains the right to revoke access at a later date. These restrictions on consumer ownership are often encoded into digital goods themselves as automated forms of enforcement, meaning that access can be easily withdrawn or modified by the company.