Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

PinePhone Pro Linux Smartphone Unveiled with 4GB RAM, Custom Rockchip SoC

Filed under
Linux
News
Hardware

Meet the PinePhone Pro, PINE64's latest Linux-powered and Open Source smartphone device featuring a custom-made RK3399S Rockchip Hexa-Core processor that runs at at 1.5GHz and allows the smartphone to receive calls and SMS messages during suspend state, thus preserving battery.

PinePhone Pro also features a gorgeous in-cell IPS 1440x720 display covered with Corning Gorilla Glass 4, 4GB of dual-channel 800MHz LPDDR4 RAM, 128GB of internal eMMC flash storage, a high-fidelity 13MP rear camera, and a 5MP front-facing camera for video calls and selfies, Wi-Fi 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.1, and an ARM Mali T860 GPU.

Read more

Extreme Overclocker Takes Raspberry Pi to 3 GHz

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Some people will do anything for a speed boost, prying the lids off expensive i9s and subjecting them to all manner of chilly chemical concoctions to drag every last megahertz out of the silicon. We’ve not seen anybody do such an extreme overclock with a Raspberry Pi before, but there's a first time for everything. Claude Schwarz has overclocked his Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 to an extraordinary 3 GHz.

[...]

Schwarz's earlier efforts saw him overclock the Compute Module 4 to 2.89 GHz, still an extreme speed boost over the stock 1.5 GHz. As well as using liquid metal thermal paste, Schwarz used active cooling on the Compute Module 4 in the form of a heatsink and fan designed for the Raspberry Pi (which could be a 52Pi model cooler). Taking the steps to overclock even further Schwarz disabled power management features to unlock a higher overclock, resulting in much higher CPU speeds than we can achieve with a typical overclock. We should probably say at this point that anyone doing this is on their own, as these extreme actions will definitely void your warranty, and we take no responsibility for whatever happens if you try it.

A little more fumbling in the Pi’s firmware - what Schwarz refers to as “removing all safety nets” - and the CM4 is running at an impressive 2.4GHz at 26.2°C (79.16°F). Not bad for a board that started life at 1.5GHz and didn’t require cooling.

Read more

Devices/Embedded With Android or Linux

Filed under
Hardware
  • i.MX8M Mini based mini-PC starts at $305

    ICOP’s “EBOX-IMX8MM” embedded computer runs Android 9 or Linux on an i.MX8M Mini with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC plus 2x GbE, 3x USB, 4x COM, WiFi/BT, and a 12-36V input.

    Taiwan-based ICOP is primarily known for its embedded boards and systems based on x86 based CPUs from its sister company DM&P Group (DMP), as in its Vortex86EX-based Ebox-3100. Yet the company recently launched a compact embedded PC based on NXP’s i.MX8M Mini. The company announced the product back in May, and it recently began shipping from WDL Systems for $305 with 2GB RAM, 16GB eMMC, and the optional -40 to 80°C instead of the standard 0 to 60°C operating range.

  • Signage player taps Ryzen V2000 for video wall displays [Ed: They make is sound like Ubuntu is supported but any other GNU/Linux distro is not]

    Ibase has launched an “SI-334” signage player that runs Ubuntu or Win 10 on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V2000. There are 4x HDMI 2.0 ports with EDID and CEC plus 2x GbE, 3x USB 3.1 Gen2, and 3x M.2 with SIM.

    [...]

    The SI-334 runs Ubuntu or Win 10 IoT Enterprise on a choice of any of the four octa-core and hexa-core V2000 parts, ranging up to an octa-core, 2.9GHz/4.25GHz V2748. AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V2000 advances to 7nm-fabricated Zen 2 CPU cores and doubles the multi-threaded performance-per-watt compared to the V1000. It also offers up to 30 percent better single-thread CPU performance, claims AMD. With its Radeon graphics with 6x or 7x compute units, graphics performance is claimed to be 40 percent higher.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC ships with up to 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software [Ed: This is not even competitive with ARM SBCs and "ships with Windows 10 Pro," so it's coming with malicious stuff]

    Beelink U59 is a Jasper Lake mini PC based on an Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that ships with 8GB RAM and a 256 GB M.2 SSD for $279+ on Amazon or Banggood, or $349+ with 16GB RAM and a 512 GB SSD.

    The mini PC offers two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and supports one 2.5-inch SATA drive up to 7mm thick.

  • The Compute Module Comes Of Age: Say Hello To The Real Cutting Edge Of Raspberry Pi | Hackaday

    If we wanted to point to an epoch-making moment for our community, we’d take you back to February 29th, 2012. It was that day on which a small outfit in Cambridge put on the market the first batch of their new product. That outfit was what would become the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and the product was a run of 10,000 Chinese made versions of their very first single board computer, the Raspberry Pi Model B. With its BCM2835 SoC and 512 megabytes of memory it might not have been the first board that could run a Linux distribution from an SD card, but it was certainly the first that did so for pocket money prices. On that morning back in 2012 the unforseen demand for the new board brought down the websites of both the electronics distributors putting it on sale, and a now-legendary product was born. We’re now on version 4 of the Model B with specs upgraded in almost every sense, and something closer to the original can still be bought in the form of its svelte stablemate, the Pi Zero.

  • Should we teach AI and ML differently to other areas of computer science? A challenge
  • Connect your space heater to the Arduino Cloud and control it via Alexa | Arduino Blog

    Being able to design your own custom smart home device is a great way to both have fun experimenting with various hardware/software and to escape the walled IoT device ecosystems that so many users find themselves trapped within. One maker who goes by mrdesha came up with a smart heater solution that utilizes the new Arduino Oplà IoT Kit to provide voice functionality to their room heater.

    In terms of hardware, mrdesha’s project is quite simple as it just needs a few parts to function. The main component is the MKR IoT Carrier board from the Oplà Kit, along with the MKR WiFi 1010 that fits into it. Because the Oplà has two relays onboard, a pair of buttons on the heater’s remote were connected to the common (COM) and normally closed (NC) terminals, allowing for a single GPIO pin to digitally “press” each button.

Using Raspberry Pi 400 keyboard PC as a USB keyboard for your PC

Filed under
Hardware

Let’s try not to get confused, but you can now use Raspberry Pi 400 keyboard PC as a standard USB keyboard, optionally with a mouse attached to it, for your computer, or twisted minds may even connect it to a Raspberry Pi SBC… “But why?” you may ask. Because we can.

That’s now possible thanks to work from Phil Howard (Gadgetoid), software lead of Pimoroni, and his Pi400kb project which implements a raw HID keyboard forwarder that turns the Raspberry Pi 400 into a standard USB keyboard.

Read more

Also: Wooting announced the new analog 60% Wooting 60HE keyboard | GamingOnLinux

Hardware Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware
  • CAN communication on the Raspberry PI with SocketCAN

    Looking for a way to connect your Raspberry PI to a Controller Area Network (CAN) bus? With the help of the low-cost Waveshare RS485/CAN hat, you can augment your Raspberry PI such that it can communicate with the traffic on the CAN bus. This article explains how to configure the Waveshare RS485/CAN hat as a SocketCAN interface on your Raspberry PI.

  • Engaging Black students in computing at school — interview with Lynda Chinaka
  • The Beauty Of Dance, Seen Through The Power Of Touch | Hackaday

    This platform, which is called Kinetic Soul, uses Posenet computer vision to track a dancer’s movements. Posenet detects the dancer’s joints and creates a point map to determine what body parts are moving where, and at what speed. Then the system translates and transmits the movements to the 32 pins on the surface, creating a touchable picture of what’s going on. Each 3D-printed pin is controlled with a solenoid, all of which are driven by a single Arduino.

  • Sinclair Pocket TV Teardown | Hackaday

    A pocket-sized TV is not a big deal today. But in 1983, cramming a CRT into your pocket was quite a feat. Clive Sinclair’s TV80 or FTV1 did it with a very unique CRT and [Dubious Engineering] has a teardown video to show us how it was done.

    A conventional CRT has an electron gun behind the screen which is why monitors that use them are typically pretty thick. The TV80’s tube has the electron gun to the side to save space. It also uses a fresnel lens to enlarge the tiny image.

  • Bendable Colour EPaper Display Has Touch Input Too | Hackaday

    The Interactive Media Lab at Dresden Technical University has been busy working on ideas for user interfaces with wearable electronics, and presents a nice project, that any of us could reproduce, to create your very own wearable colour epaper display device. They even figured out a tidy way to add touch input as well. By sticking three linear resistive touch strips, which are effectively touch potentiometers, to a backing sheet and placing the latter directly behind the Plastic Logic Legio 2.1″ flexible electrophoretic display (EPD), a rudimentary touch interface was created. It does look like it needs a fair bit of force to be applied to the display, to be detectable at the touch strips, but it should be able to take it.

Raspberry Pi Minitel Project Adds Portability to Retro Computer

Filed under
Hardware

We’re definitely suckers for vintage computers here at Tom’s Hardware but throw in a Raspberry Pi and we’re guaranteed to be excited. Today we’ve got an awesome retro upgrade project to share from a maker known as Jeremy Cook who has decided to upgrade an old Minitel 1B terminal with a Raspberry Pi 3B.

According to Cook, the Minitel was found at a garage sale a few years ago. The idea was to replace the hardware inside with a Pi alongside a battery for portability. This evolved into the final project we have today which also includes a few upgraded features.

Read more

Raspberry Pi CM4 Used in Custom Nintendo Switch Lite Replica

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

The small form factor and processing power of the Raspberry Pi CM4 has made it a go-to choice for many developers looking to create custom handheld consoles. Today we’ve got another impressive CM4-powered handheld to share, this one created by maker known as StonedEdge. After a year of designing and building, they and a friend have managed to create a Nintendo Switch Lite replica featuring a CM4 that runs RetroPie called the RetroLite CM4.

As of right now, the project is not open source, but the makers have taken it under consideration for the future. Until then, curious parties are still welcome to get a close look at the build process and internal components should they seek to create something similar of their own.

Read more

FreedomBox: A personal server for Privacy and Security

Filed under
Hardware

Over the next couple of weeks this blog will be a "living attempt" to acquaint people with the functionality and setup of a personal FreedomBox Internet server that is suitable for supporting one person or a community of people.

In addition to helping people in setting up the basic FreedomBox software, as time allows I will be expanding this blog entry to install some of the useful functionality inside of FreedomBox and additional functionality that can not really be distributed preconfigured with the distribution.

FreedomBox can be set up on a variety of hardware and operating system scenarios but a lot of people buy a single board computer such as the official FreedomBox Pioneer from Olimex, a company in Bulgaria that specializes in Open Hardware and is an official partner of FreedomBox, a 501(c)3 non-profit.

Read more

Devices: RAKwireless, IBASE, Raspberry Pi, Arduino

Filed under
Hardware

  • RAK introduces Raspberry Pi RP2040 based LoRaWAN core, more Wisblock modules - CNX Software

    RAKwireless has just launched the RAK11310 WisBlock LPWAN Module with Raspberry Pi RP2040 MCU and LoRaWAN connectivity, as announced after launching 14 new WisBlock modules for IoT prototyping last July.

    The RAK11310 module was introduced as part of the “Just Track It RAK Autumn Launch 2021” event together with the smallest WisBlock Base Board so far, as well as 11 new Wisblock modules which bring the total to 47 modules.

  • IBASE launches 3.5-inch SBC with AMD Ryzen Embedded V2000 processor - CNX Software

    We’ve covered plenty of AMD Ryzen Embedded V2000 SBCs in the past, but it appears IBASE IB952 might be the first 3.5-inch SBC with a Ryzen V2000 processor for the industrial and IoT markets.

    The board supports up to 64GB RAM, offers two SATA III ports for storage, dual Gigabit Ethernet networking, four display outputs with DisplayPort, eDP and LVDS interfaces, USB and serial ports, as well as expansion through two M.2 sockets.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #372 - Meet raspberrypi.com

    We missed you the last couple of weeks so it’s a bumper issue today. Our big news is the launch of raspberrypi.com: we have a super new website where we hope you’ll find it easy to get to all you need to know about Raspberry Pi computers and our other products. Continue to find free resources, coding clubs, and educational support from the Raspberry Pi Foundation at raspberrypi.org.

  • Arduino Becomes Superhet With A Little Help From Friends | Hackaday

    A radio receiver is always a fun project. [Jayakody2000lk] decided that his new superheterodyne design would use an Arduino and it looks like it came out very nicely. The system has four boards. An off-the-shelf Arduino, a Si5351 clock generator board (also off-the-shelf), and two custom boards that contain the IF amplifier and mixer.

    The receiver started out in 2015 without the Arduino, and there’s a link in the post to that original design. Using the Si5351 and the Arduino replaces the original local oscillator and their have been other improvements, as well. You can see a video about the receiver below.

    Tuning is by a rotary encoder and the current software lets you tune from about 4.75 MHz to a little over 15.8 MHz. Of course, you could change to any frequency the Si5351 can handle as long as the mixer and other components can handle it. The IF frequency is the usual 455 kHz.

M5Stack UnitV2 AI module gets USB camera and M12 camera versions

Filed under
Hardware

M5Stack UnitV2 is an ultra-compact Linux AI camera powered on Sigmastar SSD202D SoC with a dual-core Cortex-A7 processor @ 1.2 GHz, and 128MB on-chip DDR3 that was launched in April 2021 with a Full HD camera featuring a 68° field-of-view.

M5Stack has now introduced two new models, one called M5Stack UnitV2 USB without any camera at all, instead relying on an external USB UVC camera, and the other named M5Stack UnitV2 M12 equipped with an M12 socket and shipping with both a normal focal length camera with an 85° FoV and wide-angle focal length with a 150° FoV.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Programming Leftovers

  • ThreatMapper: Open source platform for scanning runtime environments - Help Net Security

    Deepfence announced open source availability of ThreatMapper, a signature offering that automatically scans, maps and ranks application vulnerabilities across serverless, Kubernetes, container and multi-cloud environments.

  • Josef Strzibny: Organizing business logic in Rails with contexts

    Rails programmers have almost always tried to figure out the golden approach to business logic in their applications. From getting better at object-oriented design, to service objects, all the way to entirely new ideas like Trailblazer or leaving Active Record altogether. Here’s one more design approach that’s clean yet railsy.

  • Status update, October 2021

    On this dreary morning here in Amsterdam, I’ve made my cup of coffee and snuggled my cat, and so I’m pleased to share some FOSS news with you. Some cool news today! We’re preparing for a new core product launch at sr.ht, cool updates for our secret programming language, plus news for visurf. Simon Ser has been hard at work on expanding his soju and gamja projects for the purpose of creating a new core sourcehut product: chat.sr.ht. We’re rolling this out in a private beta at first, to seek a fuller understanding of the system’s performance characteristics, to make sure everything is well-tested and reliable, and to make plans for scaling, maintenance, and general availability. In short, chat.sr.ht is a hosted IRC bouncer which is being made available to all paid sr.ht users, and a kind of webchat gateway which will be offered to unpaid and anonymous users. I’m pretty excited about it, and looking forward to posting a more detailed announcement in a couple of weeks. In other sourcehut news, work on GraphQL continues, with paste.sr.ht landing and todo.sr.ht’s writable API in progress. Our programming langauge project grew some interesting features this month as well, the most notable of which is probably reflection. I wrote an earlier blog post which goes over this in some detail. There’s also ongoing work to develop the standard library’s time and date support, riscv64 support is essentially done, and we’ve overhauled the grammar for switch and match statements to reduce a level of indentation for typical code. In the coming weeks, I hope to see date/time support and reflection fleshed out much more, and to see some more development on the self-hosted compiler. [...] The goal of this project is to provide a conservative CSS toolkit which allows you to build web interfaces which are compatible with marginalized browsers like Netsurf and Lynx.

  • Monthly Report - September

    The month of September is very special to me personaly. Why? Well, I got married in the very same month 18 years ago. The best part is, I choose the day 11 to get married. I have never missed my wedding anniversary, thanks to all the TV news channel.

  • My Favorite Warnings: uninitialized | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    This warning was touched on in A Belated Introduction, but I thought it deserved its own entry. When a Perl scalar comes into being, be it an actual scalar variable or an array or hash entry, its value is undef. Now, the results of operating on an undef value are perfectly well-defined: in a nuneric context it is 0, in a string context it is '', and in a Boolean context it is false. The thing is, if you actually operate on such a value, did you mean to do it, or did you forget to initialize something, or initialize the wrong thing, or operate on the wrong thing? Because of the latter possibilities Perl will warn about such operations if the uninitialized warning is enabled.

today's leftovers

  • CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu.

  • CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu

    Today we are looking at CutefishOS Built on Ubuntu. It comes with Linux Kernel 5.11, based on Ubuntu 21.10, and uses about 900MB of ram when idling. Enjoy!

  • Google adds VM support to Anthos, admits not everyone is ready for containerised everything [Ed: Kubernetes becoming increasingly just an openwashing shim for proprietary software with back doors]

    Google has added support for workloads running in virtual machines to its Anthos hybrid Kubernetes platform. "While we have seen many customers make the leap to containerization, some are not quite ready to move completely off of virtual machines," wrote Google Application Modernization Platform vice-presidents Jeff Reed and Chen Goldberg. "They want a unified development platform where developers can build, modify, and deploy applications residing in both containers and VMs in a common, shared environment," the pair added.

  • The Dell Inspiron 15 3501 supports Linux

    With the Inspiron 15 3501, Dell has a 15.6-inch office laptop in its lineup with its technology housed in a slim, matte-black plastic case. The chassis lacks stability: The lid and the base unit in particular can be twisted a bit too much. The matte display (Full HD, IPS) offers stable viewing angles, good contrast, and decent color reproduction. However, the brightness and color-space coverage are too low. The built-in combination of the Core i7-1165G7 processor, 16 GB of RAM (dual-channel mode), and a 512 GB NVMe SSD (M.2 2230) equips the laptop for office and Internet applications. If the storage space isn't enough, an additional 2.5-inch storage drive can be installed. You can also replace or expand the RAM.

  • Linux Foundation raises USD 10 mln to secure software supply chain
  • ISO establishes SBOM standard for open source development with SPDX

    You’re not getting attention because of your choice of text editor or the number of spaces you use to indent code blocks. However motivating those preferences are for you and me, the non-technical world sees them as private choices. You find your code in the headlines for a different and unpleasant reason: open source dependency management.

  • Printed Piano Mechanism Sure Is Grand | Hackaday

    Do you know how a piano works? Sure, you press a key and a hammer strikes a string, but what are the finer points of this operation? The intricacy of the ingenious mechanism is laid bare in [Mechanistic]’s 3D-printed scale model of a small section of the grand piano keyboard. The ‘grand’ distinction here is piano length-agnostic and simply refers to any non-upright. Those operate the same way, but are laid out differently in order to save space.

  • FPGA Boards Add VGA And HMDI Interfaces To The Original Game Boy | Hackaday

    The classic Game Boy remains a firm favorite in the realm of retrocomputing. Revolutionary as it was at the time, by today’s standards its display is rather primitive, with no backlight and a usable area measuring only 47 mm x 44 mm. [Martoni] figured out a way to solve this, by developing GbVGA and GbHdmi, two projects that enable the Game Boy to connect to an external monitor. This way, you can play Super Mario Land without straining your eyes, and we can also image potential uses for those who stream their gameplay online.

  • Art Project Fast And Fouriously Transforms Audio Into Eye Candy | Hackaday

    The overall build is relatively simple. Audio is acquired via a line-in jack or a microphone, and then piped into an ESP32. The ESP32 runs the audio through the FFT routine, sampling, slicing, and dicing the audio into 16 individual bands. The visual output is displayed on a 16 x 16 WS2812 Led Matrix. [mircemk] wrote several routines for displaying the incoming audio, with a waterfall, a graph, and other visualizations that are quit aesthetically pleasing. Some of them are downright mesmerizing! You can see the results in the video below the break.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Reach your open source community with content marketing [Ed: IBM has totally lost direction; this is how they think of Free software...]

    Both startups and more established firms are increasingly turning to content marketing as a way of reaching prospective customers. However, corporate marketers often consider the open source software (OSS) community a challenge to reach. This article features ways your technology and content marketing teams can work together to target and reach the community around an OSS project your organization supports.

  • Why digital transformation demands a change in leadership mindset

    Recently a key retail executive forecast that their industry will change more in the next five years than it has in the past fifty. Another executive believes society will change more in the next fifty years than it has in the last three hundred. A recent headline declared that, “We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history”, and Ray Kurzweil, Google’s Director of Engineering and co-Founder of Singularity University, has said that there will be fourteen internet size revolutions in the next decade. Whichever way you look at it, things are shifting… fast. When you speak with the visionaries and entrepreneurs actually building the solutions of tomorrow, from on-demand retail to vertical farms, and ask how far into this new era we are, almost universally the reply is: “only one percent”. Imagine then, where we will be ten years from now? How about 50? Major industries, from medicine to energy to travel to entertainment, are radically transforming, putting pressure on others such as manufacturing, construction, transportation, finance, education…frankly, all of it. What an extraordinary opportunity this presents.

  • DevSecOps lessons learned during a pandemic | The Enterprisers Project

    As we’ve seen over the past year and a half, the pandemic has accelerated digital transformation and forever changed workplace culture. Increased reliance on digital tools has elevated the value of DevSecOps, as enterprises of all sizes and across all industries realize the importance of automating and integrating security at every phase of the software development lifecycle – from initial design through integration, testing, deployment, and product delivery. My engineering team was no exception to this shift – we had to quickly prepare to build a new Virtana SaaS platform and deliver several new modules, all while working remotely. Here I’ll share some observations, pain points, and lessons learned to help others intelligently embrace DevSecOps best practices within their teams.