Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

ESP32 and Arduino for Weather

Filed under
Hardware
  • ESP32 Clock Takes Time to Give Weather Info, Too

    It’s fall in the northern hemisphere, so [Mike Rankin]’s kids are back in school and have returned to consulting him every morning about the weather and what they should wear. Since he’s no meteorologist, [Mike] built a beautifully dim and diminutive clock that does all the work for him, plus much more. It glows a lovely dark orange that’s perfect for the nightstand and those early morning interrogations.

    In default mode, this clock displays the time, CO2 level, room temperature, and humidity in that eye-friendly orange. But wave your hand in front of the time of flight sensor, and it goes external, displaying the low and high temperatures for the day, plus the weather conditions forecast. After a few seconds of that, it goes back to default mode. The ESP fetches the time from an NTP server, then gets the weather from the OpenWeather API. The indoor weather comes from a combination sensor on the board.

  • 3D Printed IoT Weather Station Dashboard

    This is my dashboard for my 3D Printed IoT Weather Station project, you can build your own by following my build guide.

  • I Upgraded My 3D Printed Weather Station Using Your Suggestions

    Today we’re going to be making some upgrades to my previously built IoT weather station using suggestions that you guys made in the comments section. We’ll see how well the weather station performs after the upgrades and I’ve included a link to the public Thingspeak channel, so you can have a look at the most recently recorded data.

Open Hardware/Modding: AVA 'Big Computing' on ARM, Miniature Computing, and Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • AVA Developer Platform offers 32 64-bit Arm cores, 32GB RAM, 10GbE for $5,450 - CNX Software

    The AVA Developer Platform was announced together with ADLink COM-HPC Ampera Altra server module for embedded applications with up to 80 64-bit Arm cores, up to 768GB DDR4, 4x 10GbE, and 64x PCIe Gen4 lanes.

    The AVA Developer Platform is not fitted with the top-end COM-HPC module, but still, with a 32-core COM-HPC Ampere Altra module fitted with 32 GB DDR4 memory, plus a 128 GB NVMe M.2 SSD, and an Intel Quad X710 10GbE LAN card, it still makes an impressive workstation for native Arm development. We did not know the price the last time, but now we do as the workstation is available for pre-order for $5,450.

  • USB board emulates CR2032 or CR2016 coin cell battery - CNX Software

    You can now develop CR2032 or CR2016 powered devices without having to use an actual coin cell thanks to Peter Misenko’s (Bobricius) “coin cell battery emulator CR2016/CR2032”.

    The USB board contains a rounded part that is compatible with CR2016 or CR2032 coin cell batteries and allows you to power your target board via USB. The board also includes holes for alligator clips to measure the current, and by extension the power consumption.

  • RPi CM4 based local storage server launches on Kickstarter

    KubeSail has launched a compact, $250 “PiBox” NAS and local clouding hosting server powered by a RPi CM4 with dual native SATA SSD bays for up to 16TB plus GbE, HDMI, 2x USB, 40-pin, and KubeSail software for private clouds.

    Self-hosting cloud startup KubeSail has gone to Kickstarter to successfully fund its compact network-attached storage (NAS) and storage server called the PiBox. Built around the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (RPi CM4), the system offers dual, PCIe-driven native SATA bays for 2.5-inch SSDs.

  • Raspberry Pi CM4 based PiBox 2 Mini serves as NAS, private Cloud storage (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    The PiBox 2 Mini is a networked storage solution based on a Raspberry Pi CM4 module and equipped with two slots for 2.5-inch SATA drivers be it HDD’s or SSD’s. It also exposes USB ports and an HDMI port, so I could also be used as a computer.

    Designed by KubeSail “self hosting company”, the PiBox does not only serve as a standard NAS, but aims to provide a home-based private cloud hosting solution that can replace services such as Google Photos or Dropbox with easily installable templates that are hosted in the box.

  • Surf Sensor Adds Depth To Finding The Ultimate Wave

    o say that the ocean is a dynamic environment would be a gross understatement, especially when coastlines are involved. Waves crash, tides go in and out, and countless variables make even the usual conditions a guessing game. When [foobarbecue] goes surfing, he tries to take into account all of these things. The best waves at his local beach are directly over an ever-moving sand bar, and their dynamics are affected by depth, another constant variable. [foobarbecue]’s brilliant solution to understanding current conditions? Build a depth finder directly into his surf board!

    At the heart of the “surfsonar” is the Ping Sonar Echosounder, a sonar transducer designed for AUV’s and ROV’s. [foobarbecue] embedded the transducer directly into the board. Data is fed to a Raspberry Pi 4b, which displays depth and confidence (a percentage of how sure it is of the measurement) on a 2.13 inch e-Paper Display Hat.

Raspberry Pi CM4 powered industrial mini-PC is loaded with options

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

CompuLab’s $201-and-up “IOT-GATE-RPi” gateway features the RPi CM4 plus GbE, 10/100, DVI-D, 3x USB 2.0, 40-pin, and optional 4G, WiFi/BT, COM, CAN, DIO, USB 3.0, NVMe, and PoE.

In 2017, CompuLab announced a compact IOT-GATE-RPi gateway equipped with a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3. The company has now followed up with a slightly larger gateway with the same name that advances to the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (RPi CM4). The new IOT-GATE-RPi starts at $201, with volume discounts ranging down to $134 in 1K quantities.

Read more

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head.

    The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly.

    They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.

Raspberry Pi CM3+ based SBC ships with CODESYS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Kontron’s “Pi-Tron CM3+” controller SBC is based on the Raspberry Pi CM3+ and offers 2x LAN, 2x USB, 2x COM, 2x DIO, CAN, micro-HDMI, MIPI DSI/CSI, 40-pin GPIO, and CODESYS support.

Since Kontron acquired PiXtend’s line of Raspberry Pi based controllers a year ago, we have been waiting for some new Pi-based products from the German embedded computing firm. Kontron has now delivered with the Baseboard BL Pi-Tron CM3+, a sandwich-style SBC built around the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ (CM3+).

Read more

Open Hardware/Modding: RISC-V, Smart Power, Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Hardware
  • IAR Systems extends functional safety offering for RISC-V with leading build tools for Linux

    IAR Systems®, the future-proof supplier of software tools and services for embedded development, today announced that its build tools for RISC-V supporting deployment in Linux-based frameworks have been certified by TÜV SÜD for functional safety development. The certification has been performed according to the requirements of IEC 61508, the international umbrella standard for functional safety, as well as ISO 26262, which is used for automotive safety-related systems. In addition, the certification covers the international standards IEC 62304 for medical software, IEC 60730 for Household Appliances, ISO 13849 and IEC 62061 for Machinery Control Systems, IEC 61511 for Process Industry, ISO 25119 for Agriculture and Forestry, and the European railway standards EN 50128 and EN 50657.

  • Allwinner D1s/F133 RISC-V processor integrates 64MB DDR2 - CNX Software

    Allwinner D1s (aka F133) is a cost-down version of Allwinner D1 RISC-V processor introduced earlier this year together with a Linux capable development board, with the main difference being the integrated 64MB DDR2.

    Besides the built-in RAM, Allwinner D1s comes with many of the same features as D1 RISC-V SoC, but loses HDMI output and the HiFi 4 audio DSP, and Allwinner made some tweaks to the IOs with one less I2S audio interface, and general-purpose ADC.

  • Smart Power 3 - A $45 smart power analysis tool for embedded systems developers - CNX Software

    Hardkernel has launched a number of popular Arm SBC’s with the ODROID family over the years, but the Smart Power 3 is a different type of product, as the ESP32-based smart power meter can help embedded systems engineers optimize their hardware and software power consumption and/or check for spurious power peaks during boot up or shutdowns.

    In the past, we’ve reviewed relatively expansive tools like Qoitech Otii Arc or gone the DIY route, but at $45, Hardkernel offers a power monitoring solution that’s both inexpensive and easy to use, albeit with fewer features than Qoitech’s device.

  • Omni-Wheeled Cane Steers The Visually-Impaired Away From Obstacles | Hackaday

    The cane uses a Raspi 4 with camera to detect objects, and a 2-D LIDAR to measure the distance to those objects. There’s a GPS and a 9-DOF IMU to find the position and orientation of the user. Their paper is open, too, and it comes with a BOM and build instructions. Be sure to check it out in action after the break.

Star Labs’ StarLite Mk IV Linux Laptop Is Now Available to Order

Filed under
Linux
News
Hardware

The fourth generation of Star Labs’ StarLite Linux laptop series is here, bringing an 11-inch true matte ARC display with an anti-reflective coating and Full HD (1920×1080) resolution, Type II anodized aluminum chassis with a fanless design, a redesigned glass trackpad, a contoured heat plate, and a 2MP webcam.

Under the hood, the StarLite Mk IV laptop features an Intel Pentium Silver N5030 processor with Intel HD graphics and up to 3.1GHz clock speeds, 8GB 2400MHz RAM, as well as up to 1TB SSD storage with up to 560MB/s sequential read speed and 540MB/s sequential write speed.

Read more

Open Hardware/Modding With Components, Arduino

Filed under
Development
Hardware
  • Automating Pool Monitoring And Chemical Dosing | Hackaday

    The project uses a TI SimpleLink wireless-enabled microcontroller to run the show, which allows data to be offloaded to a base station for graphing with Grafana. The system can monitor pH levels as well as ORP (oxidation/reduction potential) levels using probes attached via BNC connectors. Based on these readings, the device can dose chlorine into the pool as needed using a peristaltic pump driven by a TI DRV8426 stepper motor driver.

  • $99 Lepton FS module cuts the cost of FLIR thermal cameras by half - CNX Software

    Thermal cameras based on FLIR Lepton modules are pretty cool, but also quite expensive. Teledyne FLIR Lepton FS offers a much more cost-effective solution with the non-radiometric 160 x 120 resolution micro thermal camera module going for $99, or about 50% less than other FLIR thermal camera modules.

    The lower cost was achieved with some tradeoffs, notably a reduction of thermal sensitivity and scene dynamic range, as well as up to 3% inoperable pixels. But Ron Justin, GroupGets founder, told CNX Software that the lower specs are more than worth it for users only needing an imager, as opposed to a radiometric sensor.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #374 - Raspberry Pi <3 LEGO Education

    The collaboration of your dreams launched this week. We worked with LEGO® Education to design the new Raspberry Pi Build HAT, a brand-new product that for the first time makes it easy to integrate LEGO® Technic™ motors and sensors with Raspberry Pi computers.

  • Bring That Old Hi-Fi Into The 2020s | Hackaday

    It’s a distressing moment for some of us, when a formerly prized piece of electronic equipment reaches a point of obsolescence that we consider jettisoning it. [Jon Robinson] ran into this dilemma by finding the Kenwood Hi-Fi amplifier his 17-year-old self had spent his savings on. It was a very good amp back in the day, but over two decades later, it’s no longer an object of desire in a world of soundbars and streaming music boxes. After a earlier upgrade involving an Arduino to auto-power it he’s now given it an ESP32 and an i2S codec which performs the task of digital audio streaming as well as a better job than the Arduino of controlling the power.

  • This Arduino Terminal Does All The Characters | Hackaday

    The job of a dumb terminal was originally to be a continuation of that performed by a paper teletype, to send text from its keyboard and display any it receives on its screen. But as the demands of computer systems extended beyond what mere ASCII could offer, their capabilities were extended with extra characters and graphical extensions whose descendants we see in today’s Unicode character sets and thus even in all those emojis on your mobile phone. Thus a fully-featured terminal has a host of semigraphics characters from which surprisingly non-textual output can be created. It’s something [Michael Rule] has done some work on, with his ILI9341TTY, a USB serial terminal monitor using an Arduino Uno and an ILI9341 LCD module that supports as many of the extended characters as possible.

Raspberry Pi BMO is Fully Assembled and Ready for OctoPrint

Filed under
Hardware

RaspberryIn a recent episode of our weekly Raspberry Pi podcast, The PiCast, we had the honor of featuring developer and Artist Geeky Faye Art who’s been hard at work creating a huge BMO figure, a character from the show Adventure Time, with a Raspberry Pi inside. According to Geeky Faye Art, the goal of this project is to create a figure that looks like BMO, talks like BMO, and runs OctoPrint, an open-source system developed just for the Raspberry Pi to help manage and control 3D printers.

Inside BMO, you’ll find a Raspberry Pi with a dedicated screen where BMO’s face usually is. A speaker is mounted inside the body for audio output. A custom PCB was developed to make the front-facing buttons functional. These buttons look just like the originals found on BMO and are printed using PLA filament. Pi BMO is Fully Assembled and Ready for OctoPrint

Read more

Also: Create a Nintendo Switch clone with a Raspberry Pi | ITIGIC

The Coolest Raspberry Pi Projects You'll Find

Filed under
Hardware

When it comes to DIY maker technology, few bits of hardware have had the versatility and outright longevity of the Raspberry Pi. Launched in 2012, the Raspberry Pi is a silent, energy-efficient, single-board computer that fits inside the palm of your hand—or inside just about anything you might want to make computer-controlled.

The Pi planet has seen four main releases of Raspberry Pi boards, along with various mods and variants, over the last decade, with the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B the latest and greatest revision. (That will stand, at least, until the Raspberry Pi Foundation reveals the next rumored Pi model in 2022 or 2023.)

Some of the older pre-Pi 4 models, though, are still available for less than the cost of an entrée at your local diner, and the creativity they have spawned is near limitless. Let’s take a look at some of the best Raspberry Pi projects we’ve seen in 2021.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines