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Hardware

Devices: Canonical’s 'IoT' Ambitions, SensiEdge’s SensiBLE

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Meeting IoT challenges

    Founded 15 years ago, Canonical has been responsible for delivering the open source Ubuntu platform. “We work to ensure that Ubuntu is certified and can be used on PCs, servers and across cloud infrastructure,” Bell explains.

    “The rise of the IoT brings with it data and opportunities to monetise that data and one thing we can be sure about is that unpredicted methods of monetisation are sure to emerge.”

    Canonical’s approach to the IoT encourages the adoption of a single operating system and, crucially, one that can be upgradable over the air.

  • Tiny Bluetooth LE dev boards target IoT apps

    Two Cortex-M4 Bluetooth LE boards have gained wider distribution: Arrow is selling SensiEdge’s SensiBLE, and Mouser has Adafruit’s Feather Nrf52 Bluefruit.

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) continues to rise in importance as the wireless conduit for MCU-based IoT edge devices. Late last week Arrow Electronics announced it was launching the recently introduced SensiBLE IoT SoM, which is also referred to as the Simba-Pro, from Israel-based SensiEdge. (Mouser has already begun distributing the product, as has RS Components in the UK.)

Mobile Devices: Purism 5 Linux Phone, New in Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vorke V2 Plus Mini PC – Ubuntu PC with Impressive Features

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

The Vorke V2 Mini PC is the latest to hit the market to compete with other mini PCs in the mini arena.

If you are looking for a mini PC that can get the job done, then take a look at the Vorke V2 Plus PC. This mini PC packs a lot of premium components into an ultra-portable housing that can fix right in the palm of your hand.
The Vorke V2 Plus has support for stunning 4K resolution thanks to the onboard Intel HD 620 graphics which deliver 1.5x better pixel production over the previous model. You can even tuck Vorke securely behind any monitor or TV that supports a VESA bracket.

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Also: Ubuntu devs look at making apt index files smaller

Laptops That Ship Pre-installed With Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

​In the past, to get Linux on your laptop, you needed to get a laptop that shipped with Windows and then install your Linux distro on top of them. This usually means two main issues. The first being that you paid about $100 extra for Windows and then also, support in terms of drivers for the laptop were up in the air as your hardware may be supported fully, partially or not at all. But these days things are changing. There are many laptops that ship with Linux preinstalled. Meaning you get better hardware support and then save some bucks off for not paying for Windows. THANK YOU! So what are your options if you wanted a laptop with Linux preinstalled? Read along.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi. AutoPi, Purism's Librem 5, Tizen-Based Z4 and Artik

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Linux
Hardware

Threadripper, Ryzen, and AMD

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • LLVMpipe & OpenSWR OpenGL Riding Off Threadripper

    One of the unique test requests coming in as part of our Threadripper on Linux testing is to see how well the LLVMpipe and OpenSWR CPU-based OpenGL implementations within Mesa perform for this 16 core / 32 thread single-socket processor. Here are those results.

    A few days back I did a similar LLVMpipe/SWR comparison on a 80 thread Intel system so check out those numbers if you are unfamiliar with these CPU-based OpenGL drivers... This testing is done mostly for curiosity about the viability of LLVMpipe/SWR on CPUs with high core counts.

  • New Ryzen runs well under Linux

    After AMD confirmed the "performance marginality problem" for Ryzen Linux users, RMAs have been being issued and replacement Ryzen processors arriving for those affected. Now Phoronix has been able to confirm that the new Ryzen CPUs are now stable.

    For those who came in late, some Linux users reported a segmentation fault problem that would occur under very heavy workloads. Now the replacements have been shipped, Phoronix has been able to test the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X under the same heavy loads which caused it to go tits up.

Open Hardware: TinyCircuits, Numworks, and Open Source FPGAs

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Hardware
  • TinyCircuits Portfolio of Tiny Open Source Electronics Available Globally from Digi-Key

    TinyCircuits' selection of small-size open source electronics, including the TinyDuino, is available for immediate shipment worldwide through Digi-Key Electronics, a global electronic components distributor, thanks to a new distribution agreement between the two companies.

  • Numworks graphing calculator is made for students raised on tech

    Now, an open-source calculator called Numworks is taking them on with a clean, simple look, an intuitive interface and open source programming and design.

  • Retrocomputing With Open Source FPGAs

    A few years ago, we saw the reverse engineering of the Lattice iCE40 bitstream, opening the door to a completely Open Source development tool chain for FPGAs. This was an astonishing amount of work from [Clifford Wolf], [Mathias Lasser], and [Cotton Seed], but since then we haven’t seen a whole lot from Project IceStorm. Now, that’s about to change, and in the coolest way possible. [hoglet] is retrocomputing on an ICE40 development board.

    This is an implementation of the Acorn Atom on a myStorm BlackIce board. This board is basically just a Lattice iCE40 FPGA, a few support components, and a bunch of pin headers, some of which are in the not-so-handy Arduino pinout footprint. By porting some Acorn Atom implementations and a 6502 core to verilog, [hoglet] was able to stuff a cool old retrocomputer onto an Open Source FPGA development board. Video output is through a resistor DAC driving a VGA cable, and keyboard input is through PS/2.

Survey shows Linux and FreeRTOS out front in embedded tech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

AspenCore’s 2017 survey of embedded tech developers reveals that open source OSes like Linux and FreeRTOS continue to grow as proprietary platforms decline.

Dozens of market studies are happy to tell you how many IoT gizmos are expected to ship by 2020, but few research firms regularly dig into embedded development trends. That’s where reader surveys come in handy. Our own joint survey with Linux.com readers on hacker board trends offer insights into users of Linux and Android community-backed SBCs. The AspenCore survey of its EETimes and Embedded readers has a smaller sample (1,234 vs. 1,705), but is broader and more in depth, asking many more questions and spanning developers who use a range of OSes on both MCU and application processors.

The survey, which was taken in March and April of this year, does not perfectly represent global trends. The respondents are predominantly located in the U.S. and Canada (56 percent) followed by Europe/ENEA (25 percent), and Asia (11 percent). They also tend to be older, with an average of 24 years out of college, and work at larger, established companies with an average size of 3,452 employees and on teams averaging 15 engineers.

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Phoronix Benchmarks and AMD Recalls

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Keeping The Ryzen Threadripper Busy With An Array Of Compiler Benchmarks

    While there are an array of interesting AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X Linux benchmarks in this morning's review, after hitting a 36 second Linux kernel compilation time with this 16 core / 32 thread processor, I spent this afternoon seeing what I was getting for some other compile times of popular programs.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.4 M3 Released With OpenBenchmarking Seamless/Dynamic Comparisons
  • AMD Replaces Ryzen CPUs for Users Affected By Rare Linux Bug

    AMD’s Ryzen 7 has been generally well-received by the enthusiast community, but there’s been one low-level problem that we’ve been watching but haven’t previously reported on. In early June, Ryzen users running Linux began reporting segmentation faults when running multiple concurrent compilation workloads using multiple different versions of GCC. LVVM/Clang was not affected, and the issue appears confined to Linux. Moreover, it wasn’t apparently common, even among Linux users — Michael Larabel, of Phoronix.com, reported that his own test rigs had been absolutely solid, even under heavy workloads.

    Like the Pentium FDIV bug of yesteryear, this was a real issue, but one that realistically only impacted a fraction of a fraction of buyers. AMD had previously said it was investigating the problem (which isn’t present on any Epyc or Threadripper CPUs) and it’s now announced a solution: CPU replacement.

Devices: Triple-Display Linux Thin Clients, Asteroid (Linux) Spreads, Microsoft Dumped in New York City

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Compact thin client runs Linux, supports triple displays

    0ZiG’s “5900q” thin client features a quad-core Intel Braswell SoC, triple display and 4K support, and optional PoE, WiFi, and M.2.

  • Connect Watch: First Device To Run Asteroid OS Out Of The Box

    The Connect Watch is the first device to run the Linux based Astroid OS right out of the box, and leaving your phone at home is doable with this watch thanks to its nano sim slot with 3G capabilities with support for GSM bands 850, 900, 1800, and 1900 as well as WCDMA bands 850 and 2100. You’ll also be getting a 1.39-inch AMOLED display coming in at a resolution of 400 x 400 with no flat tire in sight. Under that display, is a 1.39GHz Quad Core processor with your choice of either 512MB or 1GB of RAM and 4GB or 8GB of internal storage. Also on board, are Bluetooth and GPS capabilities as well as a 2-megapixel camera with the ability to shoot 720p video. To take advantage of all these bells and whistles, the watch comes equipped with dedicated dialer, camera, and fitness tracking apps.

  • New York City cops will replace their 36,000 Windows phones with iPhones
  • New York Police scrap 36,000 Windows smartphones

    The New York Police Department will scrap 36,000 smartphones, thanks to a monumental purchasing cock-up by a billionaire's daughter.

    The city spent millions on the phones back in October 2016 as part of its drive to bring the police force into the 21st century. And the woman behind the purchase – Deputy Commissioner for Information Technology, Jessica Tisch – praised them for their ability to quickly send 911 alerts to officers close to an incident.

    There was only one problem: Tisch chose Windows-based Lumia 830 and Lumia 640 XL phones, and Microsoft officially ended support for Windows 8.1 in July.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%