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Hardware

Hybrid Graphics Comes To Linux In Crude Form

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Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: While the support for graphics processors on Linux in the free software stack has improved a lot over Linux, there still are entire areas of support missing, such as with supporting NVIDIA's SLI or AMD's CrossFire technologies.

Advice on building a Linux box

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Linux
Hardware

ghacks.net: I get a lot of questions on Linux hardware: “What’s the best piece of hardware X for Linux?” “Should I go route A since I’m using Linux?” Which video card? Which sound card? Which networking card? Processor? Motherboard? Will it all work with Linux?

It's official: Nokia’s Booklet 3G hates Linux.

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Hardware

I highly doubt that Nokia specifically sought out the awful GMA 500 for their netbook. This is but one of many cautionary tales on the dangers of outsourcing components. Company outsources chips to save money, supplier provides chips but not source code for drivers, Linux community suffers. Lather, rinse and repeat.

More here...

ATX mobo includes USB 3.0 and SATA III

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Linux
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: MSI announced an ATX-format motherboard based on Intel's P55 chipset that supports LGA1156-socketed Core i3, i5, and i7 processors. The "P55-GD85" offers connections including USB 3.0, SATA II, SATA III ports, RAID , PCI Express, PCI, and FireWire, and offers a Linux-based fast-boot OS called "Winki."

Breaking the Nokia Booklet, Part 3: No joy with Jolicloud.

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Hardware

Jolicloud was especially disappointing for me as one of the lead coders on the Jolicloud project is Canadian superstar Adam McDaniel. And the rest of Jolicloud works so well — WPA-encrypted WiFi, for example — it’s a real shame that the Booklet’s standout feature isn’t available to this OS.

Linux Motherboard Follies

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Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: Since I stuck my toe in the multi-core CPU waters, it's been an interesting journey. Interesting, that is, in the sense of the famous Chinese curse: "May you live in interesting times." When it comes to computers, these times are a bit too interesting for my liking.

Breaking the Nokia Booklet, Part 2: A win for Wubi.

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Hardware

Two things are clear from this experience: (1) Nokia made a very poor choice with the GMA 500, and (2) Wubi is a fantastic way to get Linux on your freedom-hating machine.

More here...

Disk-O-Tech: Linux Disk Management

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos

linux-mag.com: You might have worked with Linux for years and never added an additional disk to your system or perhaps you were too frustrated by Linux’s strange ways of dealing with disks to attempt it. In either case, here’s your opportunity to work through the steps required in adding a new disk to your system.

Open source champion Richard Stallman’s netbook

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Linux
Hardware

liliputing.com: Ever find yourself wondering what warrior for the open source movement Richard Stallman uses as his primary computer? It’s a Lemote Yeelong netbook.

Sony's First Linux Phone

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Hardware

katonda.com: Linux is gaining popularity in the mobile phone industry, thanks to Android. Sony Ericsson has also joined the Gnu-Linux club and announced the launch of their first Android-powered phone -- The Xperia X10.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop News

  • Why Google plans to stop supporting your Chromebook after five years
    It’s worth noting that end-of-life doesn’t have to mean the end of useful hardware. If you have the know-how, you can install Linux on your Chromebook to extend its lifespan. Otherwise, users whose Chromebooks are still in fine working order just have to hope that end-of-life notification never comes.
  • EFF slams Microsoft's 'blatant disregard' for user privacy with Windows 10 [Ed: It's textbook definition of malware]
    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) has lashed out at Microsoft over the company's "blatant disregard" for user privacy with the pushy, data-slurping Windows 10 operating system. Following the launch of a petition in June, EFF has heard from thousands of pissed off people who are asked it to take action against Microsoft, and the privacy campaigners are doing just that. EFF is calling on Microsoft to listen to its users, of which more than 6,000 have signed the online petition, and incorporate their complaints into its operating system. "Otherwise, Microsoft may find that it has inadvertently discovered just how far it can push its users before they abandon a once-trusted company for a better, more privacy-protective solution," EFF's Amul Kalia said in a blog post. First on EFF’s radar is Microsoft’s backhanded tactics to get people to upgrade to Windows 10, which we here at the INQUIRER know about all too well.

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Summary
    And so, GSoC has come to an end. In this post, I'm going to describe what I have done in the past 13 weeks.
  • The State of Wayland's GSoC Project For Improved Output Handling
    Google's annual Summer of Code 2016 (GSoC) is now officially over and we're starting to see the final reports issued by the many student developers involved. One of the reports worth mentioning is the Wayland project around getting Weston to start without any outputs and improved output handling. Student developer Armin Krezović was getting his feet wet with Wayland this summer and was led b
  • GSoC with Pitivi
  • GUADEC Experience
    In this blog post, I will be sharing my GUADEC experience which recently held from 11-Aug-2015 to 17-Aug-2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany. I actually got to see the faces behind IRC nicks, met most of developers and people from GNOME community and also most importantly, GUADEC helped me to meet my Google Summer of Code mentor Debarshi Ray in person which was just great.
  • GNOME Usability Test Results (Part 1)
    This is the first part of analysis for the usability test I recently conducted, with the purpose to uncover usability flaws of two GNOME applications: Photos and Calendar. For this part I am focusing on visualizing the results, demographics and talk more about the methodology I used for testing. We will take a closer look on how testers performed on every task given, using a heat map. Hopefully this will create a clear picture of the testing process and help to “get to know” the participants and understand them better!
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/33
    Week 33 brought us again 5 snapshots (0812, 0813, 0815, 0816 and 0817). There were some smaller and bigger updates, as usual.

Leftovers: Debian

  • Reproducible Builds: week 69 in Stretch cycle
    Daniel Stender blogged about python packaging and explained some caveats regarding reproducible builds.
  • Proposing speakers for DebConf17
    As you may already know, next DebConf will be held at Collège de Maisonneuve in Montreal from August 6 to August 12, 2017. We are already thinking about the conference schedule, and the content team is open to suggestions for invited speakers.
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 : Final Report
    This project aims to improve diffoscope tool and fix Debian packages which are unreproducible in Reproducible builds testing framework.