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Hardware

64-bit really does matter

Filed under
Hardware
Software

jldugger.livejournal: In a stunning display of confidence, Paul Tagliamonte stops just short of calling for dropping 64bit Ubuntu desktops. Because PAE will save the day, naturally.

The Tiny Hackable Linux Pogoplug Pro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: The CloudEngines line of tiny Pogoplug plug computers are fully-hackable little Linux servers. Paul Ferrill shows us what the Pogoplug Pro can do, and how to use it.

An Interview with System76 co-founder Carl Richell

Filed under
Hardware
Interviews
Ubuntu

serial-coder.co.uk: I imagine quite a few of you have heard of System76. System76 is a company that provides and supports Ubuntu pre-installed laptops, desktops, and servers. What I expect is not so well known is the people behind System76. I thought it would be a nice idea to get to know them better.

DreamPlug: Tiny Linux Computer That Looks Like A Power Plug

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

technabob.com: Wouldn’t you want a teeny tiny computer with no video card? Well if you do, then you can be very happy because the DreamPlug will start shipping later this month. The DreamPlug is a small computer that almost looks like a power plug.

Ubuntu and Me, Happy Together.

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

bit-101.com: I tweeted today about this being my second full day on Ubuntu and it a bunch of responses from people wanting to know how I did this or that, what my experience was, etc. So here’s the story.

PirateBox: an "artistic provocation" in lunchbox form

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

arstechnica.com: Inside the PirateBox sits a Free Agent Dockstar, an Asus WL330GE wireless router, and a SanDisk 16GB flash drive. The software, including Debian Linux and the DD-WRT open-source router firmware, is all free. The total build cost is under $100.

Thinkpad T410 and Kubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu
  • Thinkpad T410 and Kubuntu
  • 10" Ubuntu Tablet gets priced, spec’d and demoed

Processor Architecture, Linux, and the Future

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Twice in the past week I have gotten into discussions with friends about the topic of processor architecture. One of these discussions was about the cell processor.

The Desktop Computer Comeback

Filed under
Hardware

pcmag.com: It's senseless to do real computing on a laptop or iPad. For that, you need a big honkin' desktop.

Pandora open-source handheld available for order again

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Pandora open-source handheld available for order again
  • Pandora open-source console goes on general sale
  • Pandora handheld back on sale: get yours in a week
  • Skip the queue and purchase your Pandora open-source gaming device for $500
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More in Tux Machines

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here. Read more

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018
    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.
  • Ick: a continuous integration system
    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.
  • Introducing PowerFake for C++
    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing. It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates. Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.
  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0
    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.
  • nbdkit filters
    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Moving to Linux from dated Windows machines

Every day, while working in the marketing department at ONLYOFFICE, I see Linux users discussing our office productivity software on the internet. Our products are popular among Linux users, which made me curious about using Linux as an everyday work tool. My old Windows XP-powered computer was an obstacle to performance, so I started reading about Linux systems (particularly Ubuntu) and decided to try it out as an experiment. Two of my colleagues joined me. Read more

Security: TPM, Yubikey, Holes, Bricking and Uber

  • Trusted Computing
    The Trusted Platform Module on your computer's motherboard could lead to better security for your Linux system. The security of any operating system (OS) layer depends on the security of every layer below it. If the CPU can't be trusted to execute code correctly, there's no way to run secure software on that CPU. If the bootloader has been tampered with, you cannot trust the kernel that the bootloader boots. Secure Boot allows the firmware to validate a bootloader before executing it, but if the firmware itself has been backdoored, you have no way to verify that Secure Boot functioned correctly.
  • Locking the screen when removing a Yubikey

    I have my Yubikey on my key ring, so whenever I leave my computer, I have to remove the Yubikey. So why not lock the screen automatically?

  • Corporate cultural issues hold back secure software development

    The study of over 1,200 IT leaders, conducted by analysts Freeform Dynamics for software company CA Technologies, finds 58 percent of respondents cite existing culture and lack of skills as hurdles to being able to embed security within processes.

  • Stop installing our buggy Spectre CPU firmware fixes, Intel says
  • Uber shrugs off flaw that lets hackers bypass two-factor authentication

    Security researcher Karan Saini found the bug in Uber's two-factor authentication process, which has yet to be rolled out widely to Uber users. The flaw relates to the way an account is authenticated when users log in, meaning hackers [sic] with someone's username and password can drift pass the 2FA with ease.