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Hardware

HP Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google
Hardware
  • HP launches OpenSwitch community, new open source NOS

    HP has launched the OpenSwitch community and a new open source network operating system (NOS).

    HP and key supporters, Accton Technology Corporation, Arista, Broadcom, Intel, and VMWare, are delivering a community-based platform that provides developers and users the ability to accelerate innovation, avoid vendor lock-in and realize investment protection as they rapidly build data center networks customized for unique business applications.

  • HP announces refreshed Chromebook 14 w/ full HD display, new Sky Blue color option

    HP today has taken the wraps off a refreshed lineup of Chromebooks. In a press release, the company revealed a new Chromebook 14 lineup with hardware and cosmetic improvements. In addition to a 14-inch model with a 1366×768 display, HP is also offering a model with a full 1080p HD display.

    Both models, however, feature an Intel Celeron N2840 processor coupled with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of internal flash storage. The previous generation model used an Nvidia processor. Battery life is also improved this year, with HP quoting 9 hours of runtime. Though, the higher-resolution HD model will likely clock in a slightly below that.

  • HP announces new Chromebook 14 with Intel processor

    In today's open source roundup: HP's new Chromebook 14 will use an Intel processor. Plus: DistroWatch reviews Linux Lite 2.6. And a review of the Nexus 6P phone

Raspberry Pi KMS Driver Pull Request Sent For Linux 4.4

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This Broadcom VC4 DRM/KMS driver has been in the works for a while now with the main hardware target being the Raspberry Pi / Raspberry Pi 2. The Broadcom architectures officially supported by this driver are the bcm2835 and bcm2836. While Eric has also been working on a VC4 Gallium3D driver, this VC4 KMS driver being offered up for Linux 4.4 lacks the kernel bits for hardware acceleration as well as power management. There's other out-of-tree code for that, but it's not ready for mainline with Linux 4.4. Thus with Linux 4.4 on the Pi, you'll just get a nice kernel mode-set powered display with a display plane and cursor.

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Displaylink adds Linux support for USB monitors

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

A few weeks ago at IDF, Displaylink released drivers for USB monitors on Linux. This has been something SemiAccurate has been asking them about since, well it has been years now.

The idea is simple, transfer video data over USB rather than a dedicated video port. This requires a bit of compression, CPU load, and of course their proprietary hardware on the monitor side. That isn’t a big deal, the chips are fairly inexpensive and since you are buying a USB monitor or dock, it comes with the device out of the box. On the plus side it means your monitor will work everywhere, or at least it will now.

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Also: Intel Compute Shaders Appear Nearly Ready For Mainline Mesa

EPIC SBC, Chip PC, and Kobo firmware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi Screen

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The Eagerly Awaited Raspberry Pi Display

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

In the end we chose an industrial-quality display from our friends at Inelco Hunter based in the UK, who were able to create something very special:

RGB 800×480 display @60fps

24-bit colour

FT5406 10 point capacitive touchscreen

70 degree viewing angle

Metal-backed display with mounting holes for the Pi

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OSVR in the News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source VR from Razer readies for commercial launch, gains more dev support

    Back in January Razer lifted the lid on its highly customizable "Hacker Dev Kit" VR headset and OSVR (Open-Source Virtual Reality) platform, both designed "to set an open standard for virtual reality input devices."

    Now the company has revealed that the consumer version of its headset, the HDK v1.3, will be available for pre-order on October 1, and that its OSVR content discovery platform has launched and can be accessed right away.

  • OSVR's open-source VR headset is slowly taking shape

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) headset will get a significant upgrade soon. Gaming peripheral company Razer announced the OSVR program back in January, but the first prototype headset was an underwhelming affair with uncomfortable ergonomics and a so-so display. That wasn't really the point, though. Rather than a single company aiming to dominate the VR market, OSVR is a loose band of hardware and software companies hoping to do for virtual reality "what Android did for mobile."

  • OSVR releasing upgraded VR headset development kit in October
  • The Open Source Virtual Reality movement takes a big jump forward

    As the Virtual Reality gaming market grows, there are some growing efforts that are seeking to be less proprietary, and more inclusive about the process. Open Source Virtual Reality, or OSVR, is a movement that involves not just Razer, but over 230 companies that support the cause.

Open Source GPU now out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe

An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event.

The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW.

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Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

Intel aims “5×5″ at gap between NUC and Mini-ITX

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

el showed off a 147 x 140mm “5×5″ SBC form-factor slotted between NUC and Mini-ITX, designed for socketable, LGA-based Intel Celeron and Core processors.

Spurred on by the success of its reference design for 102 x 102mm (4.0 x 4.0-inch) NUC (Next Unit of Computing) mini-PCs, many of which run Linux, Intel showed off a “5×5″ mainboard form-factor at last week’s Intel Developer Forum. Billed as being the “smallest socketed board standard,” 5×5 measures 147 x 140mm (5.79 x 5.51 inches), or 29 percent less than the 170 x 170 (6.7 x 6.7-inch) Mini-ITX.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Change all the passwords (again)
    Looks like it is time to change all the passwords again. There’s a tiny little flaw in a CDN used … everywhere, it seems.
  • Today's leading causes of DDoS attacks [Ed: The so-called 'Internet of things' (crappy devices with identical passwords) is a mess; programmers to blame, not Linux]
    Of the most recent mega 100Gbps attacks in the last quarter, most of them were directly attributed to the Mirai botnet. The Mirai botnet works by exploiting the weak security on many Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The program finds its victims by constantly scanning the internet for IoT devices, which use factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords.
  • How to Set Up An SSL Certificate on Your Website [via "Steps To Secure Your Website With An SSL Certificate"]
  • SHA-1 is dead, long live SHA-1!
    Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you heard that some researchers managed to create a SHA-1 collision. The short story as to why this matters is the whole purpose of a hashing algorithm is to make it impossible to generate collisions on purpose. Unfortunately though impossible things are usually also impossible so in reality we just make sure it’s really really hard to generate a collision. Thanks to Moore’s Law, hard things don’t stay hard forever. This is why MD5 had to go live on a farm out in the country, and we’re not allowed to see it anymore … because it’s having too much fun. SHA-1 will get to join it soon.
  • SHA1 collision via ASCII art
    Happy SHA1 collision day everybody! If you extract the differences between the good.pdf and bad.pdf attached to the paper, you'll find it all comes down to a small ~128 byte chunk of random-looking binary data that varies between the files.
  • PayThink Knowledge is power in fighting new Android attack bot
    Android users and apps have become a major part of payments and financial services, carrying an increased risk for web crime. It is estimated that there are 107.7 million Android Smartphone users in the U.S. who have downloaded more than 65 million apps from the Google App Store, and each one of them represents a smorgasbord of opportunity for hackers to steal user credentials and other information.
  • Red Hat: 'use after free' vulnerability found in Linux kernel's DCCP protocol IPV6 implementation
    Red Hat Product Security has published details of an "important" security vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The IPv6 implementation of the DCCP protocol means that it is possible for a local, unprivileged user to alter kernel memory and escalate their privileges. Known as the "use-after-free" flaw, CVE-2017-6074 affects a number of Red Hat products including Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and Red Hat Openshift Online v2. Mitigating factors include the requirement for a potential attacker to have access to a local account on a machine, and for IPV6 to be enabled, but it is still something that will be of concern to Linux users. Describing the vulnerability, Red Hat says: "This flaw allows an attacker with an account on the local system to potentially elevate privileges. This class of flaw is commonly referred to as UAF (Use After Free.) Flaws of this nature are generally exploited by exercising a code path that accesses memory via a pointer that no longer references an in use allocation due to an earlier free() operation. In this specific issue, the flaw exists in the DCCP networking code and can be reached by a malicious actor with sufficient access to initiate a DCCP network connection on any local interface. Successful exploitation may result in crashing of the host kernel, potential execution of code in the context of the host kernel or other escalation of privilege by modifying kernel memory structures."

Android Leftovers

today's howtos

Artificial intelligence/Machine learning

  • Is your AI being handed to you by Google? Try Apache open source – Amazon's AWS did
    Surprisingly, the MXNet Machine Learning project was this month accepted by the Apache Software Foundation as an open-source project. What's surprising about the announcement isn't so much that the ASF is accepting this face in the crowd to its ranks – it's hard to turn around in the software world these days without tripping over ML tools – but rather that MXNet developers, most of whom are from Amazon, believe ASF is relevant.
  • Current Trends in Tools for Large-Scale Machine Learning
    During the past decade, enterprises have begun using machine learning (ML) to collect and analyze large amounts of data to obtain a competitive advantage. Now some are looking to go even deeper – using a subset of machine learning techniques called deep learning (DL), they are seeking to delve into the more esoteric properties hidden in the data. The goal is to create predictive applications for such areas as fraud detection, demand forecasting, click prediction, and other data-intensive analyses.
  • Your IDE won't change, but YOU will: HELLO! Machine learning
    Machine learning has become a buzzword. A branch of Artificial Intelligence, it adds marketing sparkle to everything from intrusion detection tools to business analytics. What is it, exactly, and how can you code it?
  • Artificial intelligence: Understanding how machines learn
    Learning the inner workings of artificial intelligence is an antidote to these worries. And this knowledge can facilitate both responsible and carefree engagement.
  • Your future boss? An employee-interrogating bot – it's an open-source gift from Dropbox
    Dropbox has released the code for the chatbot it uses to question employees about interactions with corporate systems, in the hope that it can help other organizations automate security processes and improve employee awareness of security concerns. "One of the hardest, most time-consuming parts of security monitoring is manually reaching out to employees to confirm their actions," said Alex Bertsch, formerly a Dropbox intern and now a teaching assistant at Brown University, in a blog post. "Despite already spending a significant amount of time on reach-outs, there were still alerts that we didn't have time to follow up on."