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Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Announcing coreboot 4.6

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are happy to announce the April 2017 release of coreboot, version 4.6.

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A proposal to remerge OpenWRT and LEDE

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Linux
Hardware

It appears that the OpenWRT and LEDE communities are about to vote on a proposal covering many of the details behind merging the two projects (which forked one year ago) back together. The plan appears to be to go forward with the OpenWRT name, but with the LEDE repository; domain names would be transferred to SPI.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Asus Tinker Board – An Inexpensive Home Theatre Solution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Movies

The Asus Tinker Board is a computer designed for Single Board Computer hobbyists, makers & Internet of things enthusiasts. One of the highlights of the device is its multimedia support; it’s a tremendous prospect for the multimedia enthusiast on a budget. The computer has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but it has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali-T760 graphics processor (GPU). It’s available to purchase from Amazon (and other retailers), and currently priced at $59.99.

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Turning Raspberry Pi Into Listening Device

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Linux
Google
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Android smart speaker supports Alexa and Google Assistant

    An Android-based “Clazio” speaker and smart home hub features a 7-inch touchscreen, dual 5W speakers, and support for both Alexa and Google Assistant.

  • Linux-friendly Skylake modules can take the heat

    Eurotech has spun two rugged, Linux-friendly COM Express Type 6 modules in Basic and Compact form-factors, built on Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs.

    Eurotech’s 125 x 95mm COM Express Basic Type 6 “CPU-162-22” and 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 CPU-161-17 modules expand upon Intel’s 6th Gen Core “Skylake” processors, in EQ- and U-series models, respectively. Both COMs can run Linux or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise, and support Eurotech’s optional Everyware Software Framework (ESF), an IoT framework based on the Java/OSGi Eclipse Kura project.

  • GnuBee: Personal blobfree NAS/Cloud server for hackers

    GnuBee is a personal NAS (Network Attached Storage) cloud server that is currently being funded on crowdsupply. It is a low-cost, low-power, NAS device that runs GNU/Linux and it is claimed to be based on free, libre, and open source software. No proprietary drivers needed to use GnuBee.

Qseven module runs Linux on TI’s AM5728

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Linux
Hardware

Advantech’s Linux-driven “ROM-7510” module offers TI’s dual-core AM5728 SoC, 8GB eMMC, USB 3.0, PCIe, GbE, SATA, and industrial temperature support.

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More on Intel Back Doors

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Hardware
Security
  • Intel's remote AMT vulnerablity

    Intel chipsets for some years have included a Management Engine, a small microprocessor that runs independently of the main CPU and operating system. Various pieces of software run on the ME, ranging from code to handle media DRM to an implementation of a TPM. AMT is another piece of software running on the ME, albeit one that takes advantage of a wide range of ME features.

  • Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability Escalation of Privilege
  • Intel patches remote code-execution bug that lurked in chips for 10 years

    Remote management features that have shipped with Intel processors for almost a decade contain a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over the computers that run on vulnerable networks. That's according to an an advisory published Monday afternoon by Intel.

    Intel has released a patch for the vulnerability, which resides in the chipmaker's Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability. Business customers who buy computers running vPro processors use those services to remotely administer large fleets of computers. The bug doesn't affect chips running on consumer PCs. The chipmaker has rated the vulnerability critical and is recommending vulnerable customers install a firmware patch.

Intel Back Doors

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Hardware
Security
  • Intel Confirms Vulnerability In Intel AMT/ME

    Many of you already have expressed your displeasure over Intel's Active Management Technology (AMT) and Management Engine (ME) for various reasons in the past and now it's been disclosed that for years there has been a vulnerability in this business-oriented feature that could open your Intel systems up to attackers.

    Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability are subject to a hole allowing an unprivileged attacker to gain control of the management features for these products. The issue was made public today via INTEL-SA-00075.

  • Secure Boot booted from Debian 9 'Stretch'

    Debian's release team has decided to postpone its implementation of Secure Boot.

    In a release update from last week, release team member Jonathan Wiltshire wrote that “At a recent team meeting, we decided that support for Secure Boot in the forthcoming Debian 9 'stretch" would no longer be a blocker to release. The likely, although not certain outcome is that stretch will not have Secure Boot support.'

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More in Tux Machines

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.