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Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • A $6 Linux computer that plays Doom: Could this tiny Chinese clone challenge the Raspberry Pi Zero?

    Another day, another would-be Raspberry Pi challenger, this time the tiny LicheePi Zero, which sells for as little as $6.

  • What it takes for your Linux-based IoT designs to succeed in mass-production IoT

    In Greek mythology, the story of Charon, the ferryman, goes like this: to cross the river Styx to the underworld, souls needed Charon’s guidance. Those who did not get his help were forced to wander the shores, lost for a hundred years.

  • Add Skills to Your Raspberry Pi with Alexa

    One of the leading items on embedded developers’ to-do lists these days is to add Amazon’s Alexa voice agent to a hacker board or another Linux device. Of course, you could simply buy an Alexa-enabled Amazon Echo speaker system for $180 -- or a non-speaker Amazon Echo Dot for only $50 -- but what fun is that? For some, the goal is to recreate the basic Alexa Skills of ordering pizza or asking random question like which countries were finalists in the 2014 World Cup. Others want to go a step further and use Alexa to voice activate robots, smart home devices, dashboard interfaces, and other gizmos using technologies like MQTT. From a hacking perspective, the first stage is easy, said PTR Group CTO and Chief Scientist Mike Anderson at Embedded Linux Conference 2017 in February.

  • Rugged Linux COM powers up with dual-GPU i.MX8 QuadMax

    Toradex revealed the “Apalis iMX8,” the first COM built around NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax, which boasts 2x Cortex-A72, 4x -A53, 2x -M4F, and 2x GPUs.

  • Compact, rugged, Kaby Lake SBC features robust expansion

    VersaLogic’s rugged, Linux-ready “Lion” SBC offers Intel 7th Gen Core CPUs and SATA 3.0, PCe/104 OneBank, PCI-104, mini-PCIe, and SPI/SPX expansion.

    VersaLogic has continued its line of Linux-friendly, zoologically named PC/104 SBCs with the Lion, which takes on Intel’s latest 7th Generation Core “Kaby Lake” U-series processor. This is the first Kaby Lake based PC/104 board we’ve seen, and the first to offer the OneBank extension scheme. Other PCe/104 OneBank boards include VersaLogic’s Bay Trail Atom based Bengal, as well as Diamond Systems’s Atom N2800 based Atlas and WinSystems’s Apollo Lake Atom based PX1-C415.

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Lichee Pi Zero is a tiny Linux computer module for $6 (crowdfunding)

    The Raspberry Pi Zero has some new competition. A Chinese company is running a crowdfunding campaign for a tiny computer-on-a-module called the Lichee Pi Zero that’s priced as low as $6.

  • ARM/FPGA module runs Debian on Arria 10 SoC

    The Reflex CES Arria 10 SoC SoM runs Linux on the ARM/FPGA Arria 10 SoC, and is available with SBC and PCIe-style carrier boards.

    The Arria 10 SoC SoM has been listed on the Intel FPGA site — the new name for Altera — since October, when iWave’s similarly Arria 10 equipped Arria 10 SoC Module appeared. Enclustra’s Arria 10-based Mercury+ AA1 module was unveiled in January. Reflex CES recently began shipping the Debian Linux driven Arria 10 SoC SoM, along with two optional carrier boards.

  • SMARC 2.0 COM runs Linux on Apollo Lake

    The MSC SM2S-AL SMARC 2.0 “short” COM offers an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display and industrial temp support, and an optional, Linux-driven starter kit.

  • Nintendo NES Classic Mini

    After months of trying, I've finally got my hands on a Nintendo NES Classic Mini. It's everything I wish retropie was: simple, reliable, plug-and-play gaming. I didn't have a NES at the time, so the games are all mostly new to me (although I'm familiar with things like Super Mario Brothers).

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Book review: Up to no good with 'Raspberry Pi for Secret Agents'

    It all started with the Raspberry Pi as a Christmas present, and we started with the Raspberry Pi Education Manual as our guide. As a free download, it was a very good primer to get started. Then we moved onto other books, such as Getting Started with Raspberry Pi, and I started to notice some patterns. Those books often covered the same things over and over: getting the system to boot with Raspbian, visual programming with Scratch, and using the GPIO pins. Also, I noticed that the books focused on how to use the disparate features of the Raspberry Pi, but they didn’t have a common goal or theme in mind. Both of these observations led to my next observation that my daughter’s excitement in Raspberry Pi books started to wane because it felt like we were slogging through math textbooks as opposed to reading with an exciting goal in mind.

  • Industrial thin Mini-ITX runs on 7th Gen Intel CPUs

    Congatec’s “Conga-IC175” is a Linux-friendly thin Mini-ITX board with Kaby Lake CPUs, wide-range power, Intel Optane support, and PCIe and M.2 expansion.

  • Qnap launches TS-453Bmini NAS
  • QNAP Announces the TS-453Bmini Vertical NAS

Hardware and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hardware and Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Snowden calls for AMD to open source

    Whistle blowing spook Edward Snowden says that AMD could kick Intel to death if it open sources its PSP and firmware.

    In an odd tweet, Snowden appeared to be jolly excited about the release of AMD’s new Ryzen desktop processor. But he said that the release of such a good product would be a good moment for AMD to open source their PSP & firmware.

    “In the next cycles, many will discuss replacing Intel. This is a low-cost, low-risk opportunity for AMD to distinguish themselves from Intel on an on-going basis. It's a shame to miss it,” he wrote.

  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu – Here is what you have to do to fix constant crashes!
  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu - Here is What You Have to Do to Fix Constant Crashes

    Of course, you can always download the kernel of your choice from the Mainline Kernel PPA, and use dpkg to install it yourself as well, rather than rely on their script.

  • How to Build a Linux Rig

    When building a machine, you must take manufacturer into consideration if you’re building for Linux. If you want a Linux machine and don’t want to worry that your build won’t work, there are several vendors to choose from (one of which is Dell). If you want all your Steam games to work, the best choice of Linux to put on it (short of putting Steam OS on it) is Ubuntu Linux. In the following article, I’m going to walk you through how to pick parts for your Linux machine.

Raspberry Pi Projects

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Linux
Hardware
HowTos
  • Program LEGO Mindstorms robots over WiFi with BrickPi

    For the past year, I've been teaching students how to build and program robots using the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 platform. From the outset, I wanted to find a way to use Scratch and other open source programming languages to extend the capabilities of the platform. That search led me to BrickPi, a Raspberry Pi add-on board from Dexter Industries that easily interfaces with Mindstorms sensors and motors. I requested a teacher trial to see what it could do.

  • Try the Raspberry PIXEL Platform on Your Desktop

    Anyone familiar with Linux likely has some knowledge of the Raspberry Pi. That may not necessarily equate to having experienced one of the greatest embedded platforms on the planet.

    If you’re unfamiliar with the Pi, let me introduce you. The tagline for the Raspberry Pi is Teach, learn, and make with Raspberry Pi. The Pi is a series of single board computers (developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation) to promote the teaching of basic computer science. Thing is, the small-form factor device became incredibly popular beyond the educational environment. People around the globe embraced these boards and, with the help of embedded Linux, began to invent. To that end, as of September, 2016, more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards have been sold.

  • A beginner’s guide to Raspberry Pi 3

    On Windows, just right click on the card and choose the formatting option. If you're on desktop Linux, different DEs use different tools, and covering all the DEs is beyond the scope of this story. I have written a tutorial using the command line interface on Linux to format an SD card with Fat32 file system.

More Devices

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Hardware
  • Can I host my site at home on a Raspberry Pi? YES!

    Escape the fogginess and uncertainty of a cloud solution and host your own site at home. A recent convergence of technologies has made this obvious solution both simple and desirable.

  • FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus -- a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

    The Raspberry Pi line of mini computers -- including the all-new Pi Zero W -- are wonderful devices for what they are. Quite frankly, they have inspired many young people to learn about programming, while helping makers to create some really cool projects. With that said, the Pi computers are not the only System on a Chip solutions on the market. Actually, there are more powerful ARM-based offerings available. The problem? They are often radically more expensive than Raspberry Pi.

  • Ultimaker files first patents, remains 'committed' to open source 3D printer development

    Netherlands-based 3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker has filed its first ever patents. The company says the patents are “defensive,” to protect against patent infringement lawsuits, and that it remains “100% committed to [its] open source ethos.”

Razer and Ryzen with Linux

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Linux
Hardware
  • Razer Is Planning Better Laptop Support On Linux

    Razer co-founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan has shared plans to improve their Linux support, at least when it comes to their Blade laptops.

    Razer hasn't provided official support for their products under Linux, although some community members have created third-party tools for customizing their keyboards, mice, and other gaming peripherals under Linux. Recently, Razer has been getting into the high-end laptop game and while it's x86 hardware, they are looking to ensure it's a good Linux experience.

  • Extra AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Benchmarks

    Assuming you have already checked out this morning's Ryzen 7 1800X Linux benchmarks, here are some more data points while putting the finishing touches on the Ryzen 7 Linux gaming benchmarks being published later today.

    For these interim benchmarks are some more data from the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've done in my benchmarks since receiving this processor yesterday.

  • AMD Ryzen/Zen Currently Doesn't Support Coreboot Today

    Back in 2011 was the glorious announcement that AMD would support Coreboot with its future CPUs. Sadly, a lot has changed at AMD over the past half-decade, and there isn't any Coreboot support to find today for Zen/Ryzen.

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GNU/Linux, Docker Gain in Rented Space

LibreOffice Help From FSF, Mike Saunders

  • New FSF membership benefit: LibreOffice certification
    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that the opportunity to apply for LibreOffice certification for migrations and trainings is now available to FSF Associate Members. LibreOffice is a free software project of The Document Foundation (TDF), a non-profit based in Germany. An office suite, LibreOffice encompasses word processing, and programs for the creation and editing of spreadsheets, slideshows, databases, diagrams and drawings, and mathematical formulae. It uses the ISO standard OpenDocument file format (ODF).
  • Marketing activities so far in 2017: Mike Saunders
    Thanks to donations to The Document Foundation, along with valued contributions from our community, we maintain a small team working on various aspects of LibreOffice including documentation, user interface design, quality assurance, release engineering and marketing. Together with Italo Vignoli, I help with the latter, and today I’ll summarise some of the achievements so far in 2017.

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution
    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs. For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment. Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.
  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency
    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.
  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works
    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency. Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.
  • LXD: Weekly Status #15
    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Events: KDE/Randa 2017 and Linux Foundation

  • KMyMoney’s Łukasz Wojniłowicz in Randa
    Please read the following guest post from Łukasz who joined me last week in Randa to work on KMyMoney.
  • Randa 2017 – Databases are back to KMyMoney
    On the morning of Day 5 we chased and fixed a problem that was introduced a long time ago but never caused any trouble. The code goes back into the KDE3 version of KMyMoney and was caused by some changes inside Qt5. The fix prevents a crash when saving a transaction which opens an additional dialog to gather more information (e.g. price information). With the help of other devs here in Randa, we were able to drill down the problem and update the code to work on KF5/Qt5 keeping the existing functionality.
  • Randa 2017 – Days 3 and 4
    On Day 3, we started out at 7:02 as usual with the team responsible for breakfast meeting in the kitchen. KMyMoney wise, we worked some more on keyboard navigation and porting to KF5. The dialog to open a database and the logic around it have been rewritten/fixed, so that it is now possible to collect the information from the user and proceed with opening. The database I have on file for testing does not open though due to another problem which I still need to investigate.
  • Watch the Keynote Videos from Open Source Summit in Los Angeles
    If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit North America 2017 in Los Angeles, don’t worry! We’ve rounded up the following keynote presentations so you can hear from the experts about the growing impact of open source software.
  • uniprof: Transparent Unikernel for Performance Profiling and Debugging
    Unikernels are small and fast and give Docker a run for its money, while at the same time still giving stronger features of isolation, says Florian Schmidt, a researcher at NEC Europe, who has developed uniprof, a unikernel performance profiler that can also be used for debugging. Schmidt explained more in his presentation at Xen Summit in Budapest in July. Most developers think that unikernels are hard to create and debug. This is not entirely true: Unikernels are a single linked binary that come with a shared address space, which mean you can use gdb. That said, developers do lack tools, such as effective profilers, that would help create and maintain unikernels.