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Hardware

Intel opens Netbook Linux centre

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: A new centre aimed at speeding the development of mobile computing devices around the Linux-based Moblin OS opened in Taipei.

12 handy tips for your new Linux netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

techradar.com: The netbook trend has been called something of a Trojan Horse for the spread of Linux; we're not about to disagree. It really is a fully-fledged PC - so check out our tips to help you get the most out of your low-cost laptop.

The Future Of The Netbook?

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Hardware
  • The Future Of The Netbook?

  • What’s the Allure of these Netbooks?
  • Are Netbooks the Future of PCs?
  • Cease and Desist: the netbook war of words
  • MSI Wind

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

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Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

2009: Netbook or notebook?

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Hardware

news.cnet.com: 2009 may be the year of the Netbook. But there's a big if. Here's the choice: Will consumers buy a thin, light, relatively fast $1,800 MacBook Air or a thin, light, ultrasmall, not-as-fast $700 Hewlett-Packard Mini 1000 Netbook?

Vespa: My Pink Dell Mini9 w/ Ubuntu

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Hardware

princessleia.com: I’ve wanted a pink laptop for ages, this Christmas a few of my friends got together and pitched in to buy me the pink Dell Mini9 I’d been drooling over for months.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

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Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

Review: The Logitech MX Air on Linux

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Hardware

linuxloop.com: For some time I have wondered how well the Logitech MX Air mouse really works. It claims to let you control your computer simply by holding your mouse in the air, pointing it at your computer, and waving it around. Recently, I have gotten the chance to check it out.

Gdium One Laptop Per Hacker Program

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Hardware
MDV

fred.dao2.com: I have in fact joined a great new project managed by Dexxon, the company making the Gdium, which goal is to “provide access to information affordable to all, so that all can exercise their right to education”.

NVIDIA Linux 2008 Year in Review

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Hardware

phoronix.com: Like we had done in our AMD yearly recap, we are just looking at the stable driver releases that occurred in 2008. While NVIDIA maintains two legacy branches of their driver for older generations of graphics processors, when it comes to their primary driver there have only a handful of official releases this year.

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