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Hardware

2009: Netbook or notebook?

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Hardware

news.cnet.com: 2009 may be the year of the Netbook. But there's a big if. Here's the choice: Will consumers buy a thin, light, relatively fast $1,800 MacBook Air or a thin, light, ultrasmall, not-as-fast $700 Hewlett-Packard Mini 1000 Netbook?

Vespa: My Pink Dell Mini9 w/ Ubuntu

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Hardware

princessleia.com: I’ve wanted a pink laptop for ages, this Christmas a few of my friends got together and pitched in to buy me the pink Dell Mini9 I’d been drooling over for months.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

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Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

Review: The Logitech MX Air on Linux

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Hardware

linuxloop.com: For some time I have wondered how well the Logitech MX Air mouse really works. It claims to let you control your computer simply by holding your mouse in the air, pointing it at your computer, and waving it around. Recently, I have gotten the chance to check it out.

Gdium One Laptop Per Hacker Program

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Hardware
MDV

fred.dao2.com: I have in fact joined a great new project managed by Dexxon, the company making the Gdium, which goal is to “provide access to information affordable to all, so that all can exercise their right to education”.

NVIDIA Linux 2008 Year in Review

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Hardware

phoronix.com: Like we had done in our AMD yearly recap, we are just looking at the stable driver releases that occurred in 2008. While NVIDIA maintains two legacy branches of their driver for older generations of graphics processors, when it comes to their primary driver there have only a handful of official releases this year.

AMD Linux 2008 Year in Review

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Hardware

phoronix.com: This year has been another interesting year for AMD's Linux efforts on both the open and closed fronts. We are focusing on their Catalyst driver efforts in this article.

The Freedom Key

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Hardware

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I bought a Dell M1330 laptop with Ubuntu pre-installed and yet it still has a key on the keyboard proudly displaying the Windows logo. So how could I fix this? Looking at the SFLC logo it struck me that what I needed was a "frdm" key.

Intel Atom On Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuSE, Mandriva

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Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Back in September we looked at the Intel Atom performance on a few Linux distributions using the ASUS Eee PC 901, but now with new stable releases of some of the most popular distributions out in the wild, we've decided to re-conduct these tests. We are using a slightly different Atom-based system this time and we are comparing the performance on Ubuntu 8.10, Fedora 10, Mandriva 2008, and OpenSuSE 11.1.

Review: ZaReason Makes Desktop Linux A Breeze

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Linux
Hardware

workswithu.com: Before you finish your holiday shopping, consider the following option: If you’re in the market for a low-end PC, put aside about $300 for the ZaReason Breeze, a small desktop computer that runs Ubuntu Linux.

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