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Hardware

An Amazing Coincidence or Something More Sinister?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Yesterday, as anyone involved in computing knows, Windows 7 was released by Microsoft with much marketing hype and fanfare. Canonical chose the day to announce the release candidate of their upcoming Ubuntu Linux 9.10. Hewlett-Packard also did something yesterday, albeit very quietly.

Linux Netbooks: They're Still Out There

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

oreilly.com: Back in February I wrote about how Linux had gone mainstream as netbooks became ubiquitous. Nobody doubts that Windows has captured the overwhelming majority of the netbook market. Even so, Dell claimed around that time that one third of their Inspiron netbooks were selling with Ubuntu preloaded rather than Windows XP.

Using the ASUS Xonar Essence STX Under Linux

Filed under
Hardware

techgage.com: Crave high-end audio, but use Linux? The situation surrounding this has been bad in the past, but that's not so much the case now, especially where ASUS' Xonar family of cards are concerned. Thanks to dedicated developers, the support today is just about as good as the audio quality.

NVIDIA Developer Talks Openly About Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software
Interviews

phoronix.com: In late August we started asking our readers for any questions they had for NVIDIA about Linux and this graphics company's support of open-source operating systems. Many thanks go out to Andy Ritger for taking the time to answer these questions as well as to NVIDIA's Technical Marketing Manager, Sean Kilbride, for supporting this Q&A.

Review: Linksys WRT160NL Linux Powered Wireless-N Router

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Hardware

raiden.net: The Linksys WRT160NL Wireless-N router has the potential to be both an excellent wireless router and also a simple to setup and run file and media server. The “Powered by Linux” logo and the claims on the box sound like a great recipe, but was it baked properly? Read on to find out.

NVIDIA GeForce GT 220

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Hardware

phoronix.com: Days prior to AMD's release of the ATI Radeon HD 5750 and Radeon HD 5770 graphics cards, NVIDIA released their GeForce G 210 and GeForce GT 220 graphics cards. Both of these NVIDIA graphics cards are for low-end desktop systems, but part of what makes them interesting is that they are the first NVIDIA GPUs built upon a TSMC 40nm process.

Palm Pre: first impressions

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Hardware

shaneosullivan.wordpress: My iPhone 3G died a few weeks ago after rudely jumping out of my pocket and onto some gravel, so I took the opportunity to upgrade to the new Palm Pre smartphone.

Home automation gateway runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: The Fifthplay FG4000 Gateway and Home Monitor builds on Wind River Linux to offer a customizable platform for developing home automation applications.

Easily Upgrade Any Hard Drive with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos

linux.com: I can get a half-tetrabyte drive for under $100 retail (and around $60 online) seems just short of amazing. It was just such an opportunity that helped me decide to pop into the local big-box store and grab such a drive.

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Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC

MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX SBC, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC. Now, MYIR has released an “MYB-6ULX Expansion Board” designed to stack onto either model. The $21.20 accessory adds a second 10/100 Ethernet port to the MYS-6ULX, as well as new CAN, RS485, audio, micro-USB, RTC, and camera functions. Read more

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Finding the Mainframers of the Future Through Open Source Ecosystem Development

Speak the word “mainframe” to many millennial techies, and the first things that likely come to mind are in the form of grainy sepia photos of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall computers with big spinning tapes. But that’s far from the reality of the modern mainframe. Imagine instead up to 240 10-core, 5.2ghz processors, 32TB of RAIM (redundant array of independent memory), hardware-based encryption, and fully hot-swappable hardware components. Those are the specs of the newly released IBM z14 – a single machine that could replace the computing resources of an average corporate data center with room to spare. Read more