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Hardware

Take note - small is beautiful

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

irishtimes.com: THERE WAS a time when the only way to really be mobile with a computer was with a laptop. Then came what were termed sub-notebooks. But with the rise of the internet, much of the computing power we need has moved to the web, hence the emergence of the netbooks.

Registering your shiny new HP Mini-Note 2133

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Hardware
SUSE

lizards.opensuse: So you just got an HP Mini-Note 2133 pre-loaded with SLED 10? Great, right? If you attempt to use YaST to register you copy of SLED on the 2133, you’ll be re-directed to a “special” Novell Customer Center login. It simply refreshes the page when you click submit and sends nothing to Novell.

Tiny Silent Linux PC Gets Updated

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

automatedhome.co.uk: In 2007 we ran a story on the tiny linux PC The Linutop. Now the diminutive system has hit version 2.4 and with it an official launch in the UK. The pint-sized, open source Linux PC is designed to run silently and is highly energy efficient at just 8 watts.

One month of living with an Acer Aspire One and Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

meanderingpassage.com: In January this year I posted of installing Fedora 10 Linux on an Acer Aspire One Netbook computer. I’ve been living with this combination for a month and thought I would share a few longer term impressions.

Linux-driven BitTorrent appliance ships

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Myka is shipping an embedded Linux device that downloads, stores, and plays BitTorrent media files on an attached TV. Available in 80GB, 160GB, and 500GB models, plus a Developer's Edition with a 1TB disk, the Myka appliances offload BitTorrent peer-to-peer duties from a PC.

Second netbook wave begins

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Asus is taking pre-orders for a netbook based on Intel's second-generation netbook platform, the secret-shrouded N280/GN40 chipset. Early product specs confirm that the second wave of netbooks are likely to offer faster graphics and lower power use, along with room for much, much larger batteries.

The Net Net of Netbooks

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Hardware

computerworlduk.com: Netbooks have been one of the surprise successes over the last year. They have also been one of the most contentious areas of computing. There are conflicting reports on most aspects of the sector. It's good to have some figures – any figures – that might throw a little light on this promising sector.

NVIDIA Releases Four New Linux Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: The NVIDIA 180.22 Linux driver was released less than three weeks ago, but today NVIDIA has released a new 180.xx display driver update. In addition, NVIDIA has updated all three of their legacy display drivers.

How Good Is the Asus Eee 1000?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

openmode.ca: I don’t have many tech gadgets or toys, but my Eee PC 1000 is one of the best purchases I’ve ever made. Though admittedly I have conditioned myself to say that after paying so much for the 1000 model when it was still fairly new in Canada.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • KDE Kirigami 1.1 UI Framework Released
  • [GNOME Maps:] Planning a trip
  • Etcher Image Writer Is Now Better Than Ever
    Back in may we spotlighted Etcher, a stylish open-source USB image writer app for Windows, macOS and Linux. In the months since our feature the app has released a over 10 small beta updates, with Etcher 1.5 Beta being the most recent release at the time of writing.
  • Audacious 3.8 released
    Audacious 3.8 was released on September 21, 2016.
  • New Version of Audacious Music Player Released
    A new version of Audacious, a popular lightweight audio player, is now available for download. Audacious 3.8 introduces a small set of features, including the ability to run more than one instance of the app at the same time. Quite why… no idea. New audtool commands have been added, including stream recording toggles, and cue sheet support is said to be “more seamless”.
  • Rambox Puts All Your Favorite Messaging Services In One App
    Rambox is a free, open-source messaging and email app that groups all your favourite web apps into one easy-to-manage window. Sound familiar? We’ve highlighted apps like Rambox before, with Franz and the Gmail-specific Wmail being but two.
  • Stylish Markdown Editor ‘Typora’ Is Now Available for Ubuntu
    In the market for a desktop markdown editor for Linux? You may have helped but notice that you’re rather spoilt for choice. From Abricotine and Scratch to Simplenote, Springseed and Remarkable. Even Gedit can render markdown with the right plugin! With so much choice it can be difficult to know which app to pick.
  • YoutPlayer Floats Your Fave YouTube Videos on The Desktop [Ed: just an Electron app]
    Looking for a neat-o way to play YouTube playlists on your desktop, outside your browser? Take a looksie at Yout, an Electron app that lets you add and watch YouTube playlists on your desktop, floating window stylee. Yout is not the most user-friendly of apps.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Avoid the pile-up in 'Clustertruck', a first-person platformer with day-1 Linux support, it's great
    We have been steadily getting more 3D "beat the timer" games where you're up against others times, which is great because they really can be fun. I do love getting competitive in certain games, especially with some of my Steam friends and friends in the wider community. Games like this recently have been something I've been repeatedly going back to for a break from life. Clustertruck is not only about beating the times of other people, but it's also a "the floor is lava" game, so if you touch the floor you have to start again. The really funny thing is that the safe pads are moving trucks you have to keep up with. You can at least grab onto the back of a truck if you just about touch it, so it's not always instant death.
  • Fusion 3, the next generation game engine and editor from Clickteam will support Linux
    The difference between their tools and others, is the event system. Instead of needing to program every single line, you can stack up events and link them together to create a game. It works quite well and I'm pretty excited to give Fusion 3 a go on Linux myself to see what random games I can create for fun.