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Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • A Linux-friendly DAC and headphone amplifier for listening to music

    One of my favorite manufacturers of high-quality, reasonably priced, Linux-friendly audio equipment is Schiit Audio. I recently noticed they have a new gizmo at the low end of their product line, the Fulla 2, and I decided to purchase it. Basically, this is a DAC and headphone amplifier all in one unit, meaning it covers Step 2 and a part of Step 3 as I mentioned previously, and also adds some interesting additional features. I start with the DAC+headphones part. To get it going, you plug the USB cable into a laptop's USB2 or USB3 port and the other end into the Fulla 2's "USB Power and Data Input" port, set up your music player to send output to that device, plug in your headphones, and away you go.

  • Lattice iCE40 FPGA Configured by Linux Kernel

    The example uses a Raspberry Pi connected to an evaluation board. A cheap Sigrok-based logic analyzer let him troubleshoot and debug. If you think FPGA development is expensive, think again. The board used here is well under $50 and the software is free. An iCEStick is even cheaper, and would probably work here, too. You are likely to have the other bits, but even if you need to buy a Pi and the logic analyzer, the whole thing is way under $100.

  • Candy Camera App finally launched in Tizen Store

    Great news for our photography lovers as the Candy Camera app has finally hit the Tizen Store. I say finally, as this is one of the most requested camera apps for the Tizen platform. It has already been a success on Android and iOS for selfies and now JP Brothers Inc. have made it compatible with Tizen Smartphones. Candy Camera has many great features and below I will describe some highlighted features-

SBC offers choice of i.MX6 UL or ULL, starting at $25

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Linux
Hardware

MYIR’s 70 x 55mm MYS-6ULX SBC runs Linux 4.1.15 on the i.MX6 UL or new i.MX6 ULL, offering -40 to 85°C support or WiFi, respectively.

MYIR, which has built SBCs based on the TI AM437x (Rico Board) and Zynq-7000 (Z-turn Board), among others, has announced what appears to be the first SBC to offer both NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) and the newer, more affordable i.MX6 ULL SoC. Each model of the MYS-6ULX SBC is identical except for the processor and one special feature provided by each: The i.MX6 UL version has -40 to 85°C support instead of 0 to 70°C, and the i.MX6 ULL model features a USB-powered WiFi radio.

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Related:

  • FreeSRP: An open source software defined radio covering 70 MHz to 6 GHz with an on-board FPGA and USB 3.0 port.

    "Lukas started his epic SDR-from-scratch build when he was 16. Projects like this aren't completed overnight. (He's now 18. We're impressed.)"

    The FreeSRP is an open-source (hardware and software) platform for software-defined radio that is affordable, high performance, compatible with existing SDR software such as GNU Radio, and includes an expansion port for hardware add-ons.

  • Friday Hack Chat: Open Source Silicon

    This Friday, Hackaday.io will be graced with purveyors of Open Source Silicon. Join us in the Hackaday.io Hack Chat this Friday, April 14 at noon PDT (19:00 UTC) for a conversation with SiFive, an ‘Open’ silicon manufacturer.

    This week, we’re sitting down with SiFive, a fabless semiconductor company and makers of the HiFive1, an Open Hardware microcontroller that you can just go out and buy. Late last year, SiFive released the HiFive1, an Arduinofied version of SiFive’s FE310 System on Chip. This SoC is a RISC-V core and one of the first microprocessors that is completely Open Source. It is an affront to Stallmanism, the best hope we have for truly Open hardware, and it’s pretty fast, to boot.

Zero Terminal Raspberry Pi device is a DIY handheld Linux PC in a 3D printed case

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Linux
Hardware

Coders and homemade tech enthusiasts will be excited to see the latest work from n-o-d-e.net, which is now demonstrated on its website and Youtube channel. It’s a modified Raspberry Pi device, featuring a body case made using 3D printing technology. Dubbed the Zero Terminal, the portable computer is part of an ongoing project to make the ultimate handheld Linux device.

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RPi HAT add-on does 192kHz 24-bit audio and MIDI too

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Linux
Hardware

The Pisound is a sound card HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi with 192kHz 24-bit stereo I/O, classic MIDI In and Out ports, onboard knobs, and a user button.

A Lithuania-based Pisound project has tripled its funding goal on Indiegogo, with 23 days left. You can buy the Pisound audio and MIDI card for $89 with shipments expected in July. The 100 x 56mm HAT add-on works with any 40-pin Raspberry Pi board, communicating via SPI, as well as a translator microcontroller for the MIDI interface. The board draws under 300mA @ 5.1VDC, and is powered directly from the Raspberry Pi.

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Dell Launches World’s Most Powerful 15" and 17" Laptops Powered by Ubuntu Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

After announcing earlier this year the release of the Dell Precision 5520 mobile workstation as the world’s thinnest and lightest 15” notebook powered by Ubuntu, Dell launches two new models for fans of the Linux-based operating system.

Originally scheduled to arrive during the month of March 2017, the Dell Precision 7520 and Dell Precision 7720 models are finally available for purchase, and Dell dubs them as the world’s most powerful 15-inch mobile workstations preloaded with the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • BeagleBone Relay on OpenBSD -current

    A notable recent happening is getting a -current BeagleBone Black Tor relay up and running.

  • Orange Pi Zero Overview

    The Orange Pi Zero with the H2+ SoC is a single board computer that is great for maker projects and IoT scenarios. It is best for use cases that do not require a graphical desktop or connection to a monitor as it does not include an HDMI port and only has AV out via an expansion board.

  • Rugged, 3.5-inch SBC expands upon Skylake

    Perfectron’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “OXY5361A” SBC supplies 6th Gen CPUs with industrial temp support, and a pair each of mini-PCIe, GbE, and DP links.

    The OXY5361A follows earlier x86-based 3.5-inch SBCs from Perfectron such as the 5th Gen “Broadwell” based OXY5338A. The new OXY5361A runs on dual-core, 15W TDP 6th Gen Core “Skylake” U-Series processors. Other Skylake-U SBCs include Axiomtek’s Pico-ITX PICO500, Diamond’s recent, 3.5-inch Venus, and ADL’s 3.5-inch ADLQ170HDS.

  • USB3 Vision computer can do assisted surgery

    Active Silicon’s Linux-ready, Haswell-based “USB3 Vision Processing Unit” acquires and processes image data from up to 4x USB3 Vision cameras.

    Active Silicon’s USB3 Vision Processing Unit (USB3 VPU) is designed for a variety of high-end industrial and medical computer vision applications, including its primary application of computer assisted surgery. The USB3 VPU has four inputs for USB3 Vision cameras and four 3G-SDI outputs configured to output two channels of 3G-SDI video, each with a duplicate output.

Asus Tinker Board – Hardware Accelerated RockChip Video Player – Initial Release

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Asus released a new beta of TinkerOS on their website yesterday. One interesting addition is the initial release of a dedicated video player, RK Player. What makes RK Player interesting? Simply, the video app uses the hardware acceleration features found on the Tinker Board to play video encoded using H.264 and H.265.

With the new release of TinkerOS, Asus’s website has prepared a brief support guide to the RK Player. It’s pretty important you read the guide, as you may initially think RK Player hasn’t been installed on the system. This is because the binary file, player, is not stored in a directory listed in the shell’s PATH. It’s not been added to the menu system. Instead it’s’s buried in the filesystem at /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/qt5/examples/multimediawidgets/player/. The guide recommends copying the file to a more convenient location. Alternatively, add the directory to the PATH. I’ll be kind about the unprofessional guide (blurry screenshots, broken English – seriously from Asus?) – clearly Asus is keen on releasing the player at the earliest opportunity so the community can test it out. Let’s take a look at RK Player in action.

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Gumstix adds Arduino support for Curie-based boards designed with Geppetto

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Hardware

Gumstix added Arduino IDE support to its Geppetto design service for boards based on the Intel Curie. It also shipped a Curie-based “Radium 96BIE” SBC.

Last September, Gumstix unveiled two single board computers based on Intel Joule and Curie modules, and built to 96Boards CE and the new, MCU-oriented 96Boards IE (IoT Edition) form-factor specifications, respectively. The Curie-based 96Boards IE compliant Radium 96BIE board is now available for $75, and Gumstix has also added Arduino IDE support for designing similar Curie-based boards in its Geppetto D2O custom board design and manufacturing service.

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Earth-friendly EOMA68 Computing Devices: Complexities of Hardware, Progress, and Travel

    This update sheds some light on the complexities of this entire project, summarises the status of the main portions of the project, and announces our travel plans.

  • NextCloudPi gets remote updates, logs to RAM, easy WiFi and more

    The latest release of NextCloudPi is out!

    The most noticeable change for users is remote updates.

    As new versions come out, we will have the option to upgrade our private cloud directly from the internet.

    This means that from now on it will be easier for users to get the latest goodies without having to start from scratch.

  • YubiHSM 2 open beta launched!

    With IT security breaches becoming a staple in daily news reports, organizations big and small alike need to ramp up their defense. More than 95% of all IT breaches happen when a user credential or server gets hacked. While the YubiKey protects user accounts from remote hijacking, millions of servers storing sensitive data still lack physical security.

    Hardware security modules (HSMs) offer the physical protection of servers, but are historically limited by its cost, size, and performance. The YubiHSM 2 breaks that mold with its extensive range of use cases. Applications include protecting data centers, cloud server infrastructures, manufacturing and industrial products and services, and many more.

Raspberry Pi and Orange Pi

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Linux
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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Darling ('Wine' for OS X) and Games Leftovers

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