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Systemd 234 Released, Games, Kontron Hardware, Linux refrigerators, and Paranoid Android

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Software
  • Systemd 234 Released: Meson Build System, Networkd Improvements

    Succeeding systemd 233 is now systemd 234 with yet more features added as well as a new build system.

    Systemd 234 continues the growing trend by open-source projects of supporting the Meson build system. Systemd's Meson support is currently complementary to Automake, but they intend to remove the Automake support in one of the upcoming releases, thereby exclusively using Meson for building systemd in the not too distant future.

  • GOG have released DOSBox wrapped copies of The Humans series with Linux versions

    GOG have revived another set of classic games today as the platformer series The Humans joins their shelves. The Humans Bundle contains Humans 1-3!

    With the first title originally released in 1992, you could have found it on systems like the Amiga and it certainly looks like something I remember.

  • Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap Launches for Mac and Linux on July 18
  • i.MX7 SMARC COM features dual GbE ports

    Kontron’s “SMARC-sAMX7” module runs Yocto Linux on an i.MX7 SoC with up to 64GB eMMC, dual GbE controllers, -20 to 85°C support, and an optional eval board.

    The last time we checked in on Kontron’s SMARC computer-on-modules, it was to report on the Atom E3800-based SMARC-sXBTi, billed as the “world’s first x86-based SMARC COM.” With its new SMARC-sAMX7, the company has once again tapped the 82 x 50mm “short” version of the SMARC form factor, but this time with a low-power, ARM Cortex-A7 NXP i.MX7 SoC. The device runs a Yocto Project based Linux distribution with U-Boot bootloader, and is available with a new SMARC Evaluation Carrier 2.0 designed to support SMARC 2.0 (see farther below).

  • Samsung Electronics expands its lineup of Family Hub refrigerator

    Samsung Electronics always want to satisfy consumer preferences and good taste – so It recently introduced its new Family Hub refrigerator. Samsung Electronics Family Hub refrigerator is definitely the future and it has modernized the concept of kitchen appliance. It is no longer just a fridge to keep food in good condition, now, it is practically the heart of a connected home.

  • Paranoid Android 7.2 Improves Google Pixel/Pixel XL Support, Adds Pocket Lock

10 Raspberry Pi HATs: One for Every Occasion

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Linux
Hardware

The large ecosystem of add-on boards is a key factor in the success of the Raspberry Pi, which torched the competition in our recent hacker board reader survey. Much of the Pi add-on business has moved to the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s HAT (Hardware Attached on Top) I/O specification, which launched in 2014 as an easier, more standardized way to extend the Pi’s 40-pin expansion connector.

Below is a roundup of 10 of the most interesting and highly regarded HATs on the market. This is not a review, but rather a selection intended to reflect the amazing diversity of Pi HATs. We have skipped numerous application segments here, especially in the purely industrial market and in basic accessories like touchscreens and cameras. It should also be noted that there are many excellent Pi add-ons that do not follow the HAT specification.

Compared to traditional Pi add-ons or shields, HATs, which are often called bonnets in the UK, are automatically recognized by the SBC. With the help of a pair of I2C EEPROM pins, the HAT works with the Pi to automatically configure the GPIOs and drivers. The 65x56mm HAT daughter-cards stack neatly on top of the SBC next to the Ethernet and USB ports. This reduces cable clutter and allows both Pi and HAT to fit into standard enclosures. HATs also provide mounting holes that match up with the standard RPi B+, 2, and 3.

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Devices: Linux on Arbor and Advantech Gear, Q.bo One

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Industrial Kaby Lake module runs Ubuntu

    Arbor’s “EmETXe-i90M0” COM Express Basic Type 6 features 7th Gen Core EQ SoCs, -40 to 85°C support, triple displays, and an optional carrier.

  • SBC and box computer run Android or Linux on a Snapdragon 410

    Advantech’s 3.5-inch “RSB-4760” SBC and “EPC-R4760” box PC feature the quad -A53 Snapdragon 410, and offer WiFi, BT, GNSS, M.2, GbE, mini-PCIe, and more.

    Advantech’s IoT gateway-like EPC-R4760 box PC is the first embedded computer we’ve seen that builds on Qualcomm’s quad-core, 1.2GHz Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 410, also known as the APQ8016. Advantech’s 3.5-inch RSB-4760, however, joins several other Linux- and Android-friendly SBCs built on the SoC, which features a Qualcomm Adreno 306 GPU. In addition to Arrow’s Qualcomm-backed, open-spec DragonBoard 410c, we have seen commercial SBCs like Inforce’s 6309 Micro SBC and cheaper, less feature rich 6309L model.

  • Q.bo One Open Source Personal Robot Assistant (video)

    A new open source robot personal assistant has been created by a team of developers based in Barcelona Spain which builds on the company’s mission to make social robots accessible to everyone.

    Check out the demonstration video below to learn more about the Q.bo One personal robot which is taken to Indiegogo this month to raise the required funds it needs to go into small-scale production.

Linux Hardware: Purism Librem, SailfishOS Devices, and Openmoko

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Toward a Reasonably Secure Laptop

    It’s no secret that hardware selection is one of the biggest hurdles Qubes users face. Finding a computer that is secure, trustworthy, and compatible is more difficult than it should be. In an effort to address the compatibility aspect of that problem, we introduced the Qubes-certified laptop program back in 2015.

    So far, only one laptop has been Qubes-certified: the Purism Librem 13v1. A number of users purchased this laptop comfortable in the knowledge that it would be compatible with Qubes, and it served them well in that regard. However, the Librem 13v1 is no longer being manufactured, and the Librem 13v2 has not undergone Qubes-certification (nor has any other laptop yet). This means that the need for compatible hardware is more pressing than ever.

  • SailFishOS: The Next Great iOS And Android Rival Powered By Linux

    Nowadays, everyone under the age of forty owns a smartphone. The majority of people use either Android or iOS smart devices. Other companies have tried busting into this market, such as Microsoft and Blackberry but have failed miserably. Try and think of one friend who uses Windows Mobile, or a Blackberry OS powered device. You can’t.

  • Ten years after first shipping Openmoko Neo1973

    Exactly 10 years ago, on July 9th, 2007 we started to sell+ship the first Openmoko Neo1973. To be more precise, the webshop actually opened a few hours early, depending on your time zone. Sean announced the availability in this mailing list post

    I don't really have to add much to my ten years [of starting to work on] Openmoko anniversary blog post a year ago, but still thought it's worth while to point out the tenth anniversary.

Tiny, $9 Orange Pi may be first 96Boards IoT SBC to run Linux

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Hardware

The “Orange Pi i96” is a 96Boards IoT-like SBC with a Cortex-A5 based RDA8810PL SoC, WiFi and Bluetooth, USB and micro-USB, and a 40-pin header.

Shenzhen Xunlong’s 60 x 30mm Orange Pi i96 appears to be the second 96Boards IoT Edition (IE) board after the BLE Carbon from SeeedStudio, and the first to run Linux. While the Carbon runs Zephyr on an ST Cortex-M4 SoC, the Orange Pi i96 uses the same Cortex-A5 based RDA8810PL SoC from RDA Microelectronics adopted by the $10, 68 x 42mm Orange Pi 2G-IOT, but without the 2G GPRS baseband component.

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Also: These Videos of Mycroft, the Open-Source Alexa, Are Just Too Funny

Industrial touch-panel computer builds on Raspberry Pi 3

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Linux
Hardware

MASS unveiled an “RPI-07” touch-panel computer based on the Raspberry Pi 3 with a 7-inch, multi-touch display, VESA 75 mounting, and optional I/O modules.

The Raspberry Pi 3 is increasingly being adopted for various industrial computers, and can now be found in an industrial touch-panel. The RPI-07 from German embedded vendor MASS is an all-in-one (AiO) that houses its RPi 3 SBC in a 200 x 118 x 48mm, powder coated aluminum case along with an integrated 7-inch touchscreen.

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Also: Rugged, Kaby Lake box-PC targets vision systems

Tizen, So-called 'IoT', and Other Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • New Steam Link app works amazingly well on Samsung TVs

    Samsung Electronics has a new Steam Link app on its Smart TVs. Game streaming can now be done directly on the TV and it works amazingly well as it does via the Steam Link hardware. This new Steam Link functionality is as a result of the collaboration between Valve and Samsung. Though the collaboration between Valve and Samsung is still in beta, it’s worth trying for easy PC gaming in the living room. With this Steam Link, a controller can be connected to a Samsung TV to play PC games without a PC, console or set-top box.

  • Report – Linux based Operating Systems for IoT takes lead with a massive 80% market share

    The domestic PC OS market has been a complete one sided dominance by Microsoft’s Windows OS for a long time now. This year, Windows had a 96.99 percent market share (although a 0.11 percent slip from last year) and this strong hold of the PC OS market is not likely to change for years to come. However, Windows also happens to be on the receiving end of domination in new technology domains such as IoT (Internet of Things) and Cloud Computing. Linux has been the most favorable choice in these domains as it is an Open Source platform.

    [...]

    Tizen, which is also based on Linux, at its kernel has also been actively contributing to the IoT industry with Samsung’s long line up of Home Appliances being built with Tizen as the embedded OS. With the upcoming version 4.0 of Tizen, the foray of Tizen into the IoT industry is expected to grow massively as discussed during this years Tizen Developer Conference.

  • Flowhub IoT workshop at Bitraf: sensors, access control, and more

    I just got back to Berlin from the Bitraf IoT hackathon we organized in Oslo, Norway. This hackathon was the first of two IoT workshops around MsgFlo and Flowhub IoT. The second will be held at c-base in Berlin this coming weekend.

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  • An Ode to the Coming of the 4K Board

    Every jump in computer resolution technology brings with it a cornucopia of new creative and business opportunities. When I noticed recently that an affordable 4K hobby computer board was being launched on Kickstarter, I felt moved to compose this song — Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory of the Coming of the 4K Board.

Ubuntu Laptops from VANT Get Kaby Lake Refresh, Priced from €609

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Finding a Linux laptop used to be a chore — but that’s not quite the case anymore.

Companies like Dell, HP, Entroware, Tuxedo, ThinkPenguin, ZaReason, Slimbook and many others offer us up an array of laptops and PCs that are pre-loaded with Linux.

Also part of that list is Vant. Vant is a small Spanish computer company that sell a range of Linux laptops and desktop PCs in (where else?) Spain.

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Also: Last Call To Participate In The 2017 Linux Laptop Survey

Here’s who won 26 SBCs in our annual Hacker SBC Survey

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Linux
Hardware

The 26 winners randomly picked from the 1,705 participants in our annual Hacker SBC Survey have now been confirmed. They’re located in 12 countries.

After randomly selecting 26 names from all of the participants in the recently concluded 2017 Hacker SBC Survey that we cosponsored with the Linux Foundation’s Linux.com community site, we can now reveal the list of boards awarded to each. We have obfuscated the names to protect their privacy, but they’ll know who they are, and will now see which boards they won.

The prizes in this year’s Hacker SBC Survey include several BeagleBone models, including the new BeagleBone Blue robotics kit. Other giveaways include the Qualcomm-backed DragonBoard 410c, the Gumstix Pepper DVI-D, the Intel-backed MinnowBoard Turbot Quad-core, and several Aaeon UP board models. We’ve also included one popular non-Linux board, the Arduino Uno WiFi.

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Devices: Tesla, Ubuntu Core, Julia, DEN, Synopsys, MinnowBoard, AGL and More

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Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Aaeon, Corvalent, and Renesas Electronics

Red Hat and Servers: India, China, Docker and Kubernetes

GNOME: LVFS and Epiphany

  • Richard Hughes: Shaking the tin for LVFS: Asking for donations!
    Nearly 100 million files are downloaded from the LVFS every month, the majority being metadata to know what updates are available. Although each metadata file is very small it still adds up to over 1TB in transfered bytes per month. Amazon has kindly given the LVFS a 2000 USD per year open source grant which more than covers the hosting costs and any test EC2 instances. I really appreciate the donation from Amazon as it allows us to continue to grow, both with the number of Linux clients connecting every hour, and with the number of firmware files hosted. Before the grant sometimes Red Hat would pay the bandwidth bill, and other times it was just paid out my own pocket, so the grant does mean a lot to me. Amazon seemed very friendly towards this kind of open source shared infrastructure, so kudos to them for that. At the moment the secure part of the LVFS is hosted in a dedicated Scaleway instance, so any additional donations would be spent on paying this small bill and perhaps more importantly buying some (2nd hand?) hardware to include as part of our release-time QA checks.
  • Epiphany 3.28 Development Kicks Off With Safe Browsing, Better Flatpak Handling
    Epiphany 3.27.1 was released a short time ago as the first development release of this web-browser for the GNOME 3.28 cycle. For being early in the development cycle there is already a fair number of improvements with Epiphany 3.27.1. Some of the highlights include Google Safe Browsing support, a new address bar dropdown powered by libdazzle, and improvements to the Flatpak support.
  • Safe Browsing in Epiphany
    I am pleased to announce that Epiphany users will now benefit from a safe browsing support which is capable to detect and alert users whenever they are visiting a potential malicious website. This feature will be shipped in GNOME 3.28, but those who don’t wish to wait that long can go ahead and build Epiphany from master to benefit from it. The safe browsing support is enabled by default in Epiphany, but you can always disable it from the preferences dialog by toggling the checkbox under General -> Web Content -> Try to block dangerous websites.

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