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Linux Devices

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Hardware
  • Nougat-flavored Nano-ITX SBC targets voice control

    Intrinsyc’s “Open-Q 212” SBC runs Android 7 on a quad -A7 Snapdragon 212, and offers special audio features for developing voice controlled devices.

  • Crowd funding the Radio access technology

    At Lime we have a mission to democratize wireless networks and to bring disruptive technology to the cellular market which will enable the service providers to deploy, maintain and upgrade their network at a fraction of today’s cost. Lime manufactures advanced RF integrated circuits called FPRFs (Field Programmable RF), also known as Software Defined Radios, which are fully programmable dual transceivers. Our chips cover all the cellular channels used globally, which makes them ideal for applications such as radio access for cellular and IoT.

  • This Mega-Sensor Makes the Whole Room Smart

    Laput, a graduate student studying computer-human interaction at Carnegie Mellon University, built the gadget as part of a project he calls Synthetic Sensors. He says it could be used to do things like figure out how many paper towels you’ve got left, detect when someone enters or leaves a building, or keep an eye on an elderly family member (by tracking the person’s typical routine via appliances, for example). It’s being shown off this week in Denver at the CHI computer-human interaction conference.

  • Thin, tough Mini-ITX board runs Linux on Apollo Lake

    Adlink’s rugged “AmITX-AL-I” is a thin Mini-ITX board based on Intel Apollo Lake. It offers triple and 4K displays, plus mini-PCIe, PCIe, and mSATA.

    Adlink briefly announced the AmITX-AL-I when unveiling several Intel Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” COMs back in November. The board now has a product page, although it’s still tagged as “preliminary.”

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Linksys is making its first modem / router hybrid

    Linksys, a networking company that makes both routers and modems, is now releasing a router / modem hybrid device that combines the two into one. While these kinds of devices aren’t exactly new, it is Linksys’s first shot at making one [...]

  • Congatec proposes API and middleware spec for COMs

    Congatec has launched a “ComX” standard for computer-on-module API and middleware spanning COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC form-factors.

    At the Embedded Systems Expo & Conference (ESEC) in Japan this week (May 10-12), Congatec announced an “extended standardization initiative” called ComX. The proposed standard builds upon existing computer-on-module hardware standards such as COM Express, Qseven, and SMARC to standardize APIs and middleware, including its new Cloud API. The spec also includes some hardware standardization for COM integration with carrier boards.

  • OK Google: make this Nest hack a standard feature

    This easy (“at your own risk”) hack can unlock a Nest thermostat’s “Cool” mode in heater-only installations, allowing control of a heater’s ventilation fan as though it’s an A/C.

  • Clustering system supports up to 72 ARM modules

    Christmann’s “RECS|Box” evaluation platform and server enclosures can cluster up to 72 Toradex Apalis COMs, and offer GbE and KVM switching.

    Toradex announced that Christmann Informationstechnik + Medien GmbH & Co. KG has launched several RECS|Box cluster-computing platforms for Toradex’s ARM-based, Linux-friendly Apalis computer-on-modules. The systems work with any of Toradex’s SODIMM-style, pin-compatible Apalis-brand modules, including the i.MX6-based Apalis iMX6, Tegra K1 based Apalis TK1, and the soon-to-ship, i.MX8-based Apalis iMX8, among others.

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi Fans Can Build Their Own AI Voice Assistant

    Google and AIY Projects last week launched an open source do-it-yourself artificial intelligence Voice Kit for Raspberry Pi hobbyists.

    The AIY Voice Kit includes hardware for audio capture and playback, connectors for the dual mike daughterboard and speaker, GPIO pins to connect low-voltage components such as micro servos and sensors, and an optional barrel connector for a dedicated power supply.

    The Voice Kit can use cloud services such as the recently released Google Assistant SDK, which is enabled by default, or it can use the Cloud Speech API or run completely on-device.

  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 Supports Raspberry Pi Zero W, Based on Chromium 56

    After informing us last month about the release of Raspberry WebKiosk 6.0 for Raspberry Pi single-board computers, Binary Emotions is informing us today about the availability of Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0.

  • Portwell’s four new RS4U industrial PCs use a common API stack

    Portwell’s “RS4U” industrial computers feature a standard set of Portwell APIs. The first four models support Intel Apollo Lake, Skylake, and Haswell CPUs.

  • Rugged PC/104 SBC sandwich runs on Kaby Lake

    VersaLogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Liger” offers 7th Gen Core CPUs, ruggedization features, and mini-PCIe, SPI/SPX, and PC/104-Plus expansion.

Announcing coreboot 4.6

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

We are happy to announce the April 2017 release of coreboot, version 4.6.

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A proposal to remerge OpenWRT and LEDE

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Linux
Hardware

It appears that the OpenWRT and LEDE communities are about to vote on a proposal covering many of the details behind merging the two projects (which forked one year ago) back together. The plan appears to be to go forward with the OpenWRT name, but with the LEDE repository; domain names would be transferred to SPI.

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Linux Devices

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Hardware

Asus Tinker Board – An Inexpensive Home Theatre Solution

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
Movies

The Asus Tinker Board is a computer designed for Single Board Computer hobbyists, makers & Internet of things enthusiasts. One of the highlights of the device is its multimedia support; it’s a tremendous prospect for the multimedia enthusiast on a budget. The computer has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but it has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali-T760 graphics processor (GPU). It’s available to purchase from Amazon (and other retailers), and currently priced at $59.99.

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Turning Raspberry Pi Into Listening Device

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Linux
Google
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Android smart speaker supports Alexa and Google Assistant

    An Android-based “Clazio” speaker and smart home hub features a 7-inch touchscreen, dual 5W speakers, and support for both Alexa and Google Assistant.

  • Linux-friendly Skylake modules can take the heat

    Eurotech has spun two rugged, Linux-friendly COM Express Type 6 modules in Basic and Compact form-factors, built on Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs.

    Eurotech’s 125 x 95mm COM Express Basic Type 6 “CPU-162-22” and 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 CPU-161-17 modules expand upon Intel’s 6th Gen Core “Skylake” processors, in EQ- and U-series models, respectively. Both COMs can run Linux or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise, and support Eurotech’s optional Everyware Software Framework (ESF), an IoT framework based on the Java/OSGi Eclipse Kura project.

  • GnuBee: Personal blobfree NAS/Cloud server for hackers

    GnuBee is a personal NAS (Network Attached Storage) cloud server that is currently being funded on crowdsupply. It is a low-cost, low-power, NAS device that runs GNU/Linux and it is claimed to be based on free, libre, and open source software. No proprietary drivers needed to use GnuBee.

Qseven module runs Linux on TI’s AM5728

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Linux
Hardware

Advantech’s Linux-driven “ROM-7510” module offers TI’s dual-core AM5728 SoC, 8GB eMMC, USB 3.0, PCIe, GbE, SATA, and industrial temperature support.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-2 Rolls Out for Ubuntu Phones, Including Nexus 4 & Nexus 7 2013

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Qt 5.10 Alpha in testing for KDE neon

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