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Open Broadcast Software Studio - Ready for the silver screen?

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Software
Movies
Reviews

Having recently tested Kdenlive 19.08 and then taken a brief but pleasant look at OpenShot, I decided to expand my cinematic horizons and explore some additional software on the media market. One program that came into the hazy spotlight is Open Broadcast Software (OBS), a free and open-source video editor, designed primarily for video recording and live streaming.

Well, here I am, with me unfunny collection of Youtube clips, and here it is, OBS, waiting for me to test and review it. Sounds like a plan, and proceed so we shall. Once again, I'm back on Linux, in Kubuntu, but that shouldn't really make much difference. Anyway, let's begin.

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OpenShot 2.5.0 Released | Video Editing + Hardware Acceleration!

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Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.5.0 Released | Video Editing + Hardware Acceleration!

    I am proud to announce the release of OpenShot 2.5.0, our largest release yet! In honesty, this release got a bit too large and almost crushed my brain, but I’m happy to finally release it into the wild! May it have safe travels!

  • OpenShot 2.5 Video Editor Brings Hardware Acceleration, SVG, Blender 2.8+ Compatibility

    Out this Sunday is OpenShot 2.5 as the non-linear video editor's biggest release yet for this cross-platform, open-source solution.

    First up, OpenShot 2.5 is finally supporting hardware-accelerated video encoding/decoding. Rather than being limited to CPU-based options, OpenShot 2.5 now supports the likes of VA-API and NVENC/NVDEC for GPU-based encodes/decodes that should be 30~40% faster.

  • OpenShot 2.5.0 Free Video Editor Adds Hardware Acceleration, Blender 2.8 Support

    OpenShot, a free and open source video editor, was updated to version 2.5.0 with some significant improvements like hardware encoding and decoding support, much faster keyframe performance, support for exporting and importing EDL and XML (Premiere, Final Cut Pro and more) files, and Belnder 2.8+ support, among others.

Spring the mouse trap: don't fall for Disney+

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GNU
Movies
Web

It's common to feel a little uneasy when it comes to Disney. Most people know that the mouse didn't get to where he is now by himself, and that behind him there are more shadowy people wearing suits than their cheerful advertising admits. Likewise, the intricate control and extensive surveillance they have over their parks can be seen as a playground for dystopia.

Over the last few decades, the company has grown tremendously, with billion dollar franchises such as Star Wars and the Marvel universe making up only a fraction of the Disney empire, in addition to the complete film catalog of 20th Century Fox. Disney's leadership in the movie world has given them immense power that they have a rich history of abusing, as we've seen with the "Mickey Mouse Protection Act," and the notorious Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Like the witch with her cauldron, Disney executives were concocting something evil when they were brewing up Disney+. It needed just the right amount of poison to be palatable: not enough to where it would turn everyone away, but not so little that users would be able to actually take a screenshot of the film that they are watching. Maleficent is more than just a character in a Disney film; it's an apt descriptor for the behavior of Disney itself when it comes to their attack on culture through Digital Restrictions Management (DRM).

Along with the steady wave of advertising, Disney+ drew early comments from concerned free software developers like Hans de Goede, who was among the first to point out that Disney+ would be using the highest restriction level of Widevine DRM. Widevine is a scheme that's familiar to anti-DRM activists, and is one commonly embedded in Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), the World Wide Web's Consortium's initiative to create a Hollyweb out of the Internet. For a short time, this made the Disney+ "service" incompatible with all GNU/Linux systems, Chromebooks, and many older Android devices. Though public comment led them to loosen the shackles a little, that doesn't mean that your favorite films are any less imprisoned.

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CBS All Access serves ads, but not content, to Linux users

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GNU
Linux
Movies

I'm both a Linux user and a CBS All Access subscriber myself, but I had been unaware of the problem since I do all my own watching on a Roku. Technically, the Roku is a Linux PC in its own right—but CBS has its own app in the Roku store, which works perfectly.

Moving back to one of my own PCs, I was quickly able to confirm the issue: trailers autoplay properly, and even the ads work—but the actual content won't play on a Linux desktop PC on any browser including Google Chrome. Diving into the Chrome Web Console, we can see HTTP 400 (Bad Request) errors when the browser attempts to fetch a license from CBS' Widevine back end.

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MPV 0.32 Released

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Software
Movies

  • MPV 0.32 Released with RAR5 Support & Initial Bash Completion

    MPV media player released version 0.32.0 today with some new features and various bug-fixes.

    MPV 0.32.0 features RAR5 support and initial implementation of bash completion.

  • MPV Player 0.32 Released With RAR5 Support, Bash Completion

    MPV 0.32 is out today as the newest update to this open-source video player based on MPlayer.

    MPV 0.32 adds support for RAR5 compressed content within its libarchive stream implementation. This latest version of RAR supports multi-threaded compression, other compression and decompression speed improvements, and other design improvements.

OpenShot - If you have to ... shot, shot, don't talk

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Software
Movies

As you probably know, my go-to video editor is Kdenlive, which I've used many times before, to great success, creating dozens of unfunny clips, all of them available on my Youtube channel. But then, I've recently had less luck with the program, having tested both 2018's beta and last year's 19.08 stable edition, and neither really impressed me.

I came across bugs and crashes, and overall, it felt like the application has taken a nosedive. While older versions ought to keep working fine for quite a while longer, I wouldn't like to be in a position where my artistic spread of majestic wings is curtailed for any reasons. Hence, alternatives, hence testing. And thus, I came across an old-new title, OpenShot, a free, cross-platform video editor. Funnily, I've seen it many times before, but never really used in properly. This article shall remedy that.

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MPV 0.31

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Software
Movies
  • MPV 0.31 Video Player Adds Pseudo Client Side Decorations, Wayland Improvements

    MPV 0.31 is this last release of 2019 for this popular open-source video player. MPV 0.31 has been laying the groundwork for a Lua-powered console, a Wayland grab zone for being able to resize the window with mouse, pseudo client side decorations, video filter support making use of the GPU video output renderer, support for NVIDIA VDPAU usage under EGL, and a variety of other improvements and changes.

  • MPV media player 0.31 Released (Ubuntu PPA)

    MPV, an open-source MPlayer nd MPlayer2 based media player, released version 0.31 today.

Daniel Stenberg: Mr Robot curl

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Software
Movies

Vasilis Lourdas reported that he did a “curl sighting” in the show and very well I took a closer peek and what do we see some 37 minutes 36 seconds into episode 8 season 4…

(I haven’t followed the show since at some point in season two so I cannot speak for what actually has happened in the plot up to this point. I’m only looking at and talking about what’s on the screenshots here.)

Elliot writes Python. In this Python program, we can see two curl invokes, both unfortunately a blurry on the right side so it’s hard to see them exactly (the blur is really there in the source and I couldn’t see/catch a single frame without it). Fortunately, I think we get some additional clues later on in episode 10, see below.

He invokes curl with -i to see the response header coming back but then he makes some questionable choices. The -k option is the short version of --insecure. It truly makes a HTTPS connection insecure since it completely switches off the CA cert verification. We all know no serious hacker would do that in a real world use.

Perhaps the biggest problem for me is however the following -X POST. In itself it doesn’t have to be bad, but when taking the second shot from episode 10 into account we see that he really does combine this with the use of -d and thus the -X is totally superfluous or perhaps even wrong. The show technician who wrote this copied a bad example…

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New Videos: Microsoft Control and System76 Thelio Desktop

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Movies

Talks and Audiocasts: LibreOffice Conference, Network Block Device (NBD), Ubuntu Podcast and BSD Now

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Interviews
Movies
  • LibreOffice Conference 2019: Lightning talks

    Towards the end of the recent LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain, we had a series of “lightning talks” – that is, quick presentations on various topics.

  • Short talk about NBD from the KVM Forum 2019

    Here’s our short talk about Network Block Device (NBD) given at the KVM Forum last month...

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E34 – Buggy Boy

    This week we’ve been in Vancouver and planning for Ubuntu 20.04. We respond to all your distro hopping feedback and bring you a command line love.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 34 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Certified BSD | BSD Now 326

    LPI releases BSD Certification, openzfs trip report, Using FreeBSD with ports, LLDB threading support ready, Linux versus Open Source Unix, and more.

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The Chrome Cast 50: Linux on Chromebooks and the future of Chrome OS tablets

This week on The Chrome Cast, we’re exploring a couple seemingly-unconnected ideas that actually tie into one another quite well. First up is the heightened interest in Linux apps on Chrome OS. While we’ve been tracking along with the development of Crostini since before it was actually a thing, it’s been a while since we’ve really dug into what Chromebooks are capable of with Linux. As part of that renewed effort, we’ve launched Command Line, where we are focusing more on what users can do and get done with Linux apps on their Chromebook. Read more Another new show:

  • 2020-02-28 | Linux Headlines

    The Open Source Initiative kicks a co-founder from its mailing lists, OBS faces backlash for receiving support from Facebook Gaming, and Collabora launches its version of LibreOffice for mobile.

Linux-powered module charges up the RISC-V PolarFire SoC

Aries’ “M100PFS” module runs Linux on Microchip’s RISC-V based PolarFire SoC with FPGAs up to 265K LE. Features include up to 8GB LPDDR4, up to 64GB eMMC, and support for up to 16x SERDES lanes. Aries Embedded announced one of the first compute modules equipped with the PolarFire SoC, a Linux-powered, FPGA-enabled RISC-V SoC from Microchip’s Microsemi unit (see farther below). The M100PFS has the same 74 x 42mm footprint as Aries’ similar M100PF module, which is equipped with the PolarFire FPGA without the Linux-ready RISC-V cores. Read more

Android as a Desktop

  • Android-x86 project lets you run Android 9 Pie on a desktop, laptop, or table

    The team at the Android-x86 project Abba released their latest version of an Android based desktop operating system, offering an open source platform that can run Android 9 Pie on a desktop, laptop, or tablet with an Intel or AMD processor. Today the team announced the public release of Android-x86 9.0, the first stable release for Android-x86 9.0 (pie-x86). The prebuilt images are now available to download from Foss Hub and OSDN, check out the links below. The latest release includes support for 32-bit and 64-bit x86 processors, hardware-accelerated graphics with support for OpenGL ES 3.x on Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA GPUs, as well as experimental Vulkan graphics support, together with an optional Taskbar launcher, although you can also use the default Android-style launcher if you prefer. Other supported areas within the Android desktop operating system include WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet, camera, audio, and multitouch input.

  • Android-x86 9.0 Offering Android Pie Experience on Computer Released
  • Android is NOT Linux

    Android is NOT Linux Let's go over why Android is nothing like Linux. While it may use a Linux Kernel it is a completely different beast altogether.

OpenSUSE News Outsourced to Microsoft, Dominique Leuenberger's Report on Tumbleweed

  • Moving to the new News [Ed: News outsourced to Microsoft then]

    In an effort to make contributing to openSUSE easier, openSUSE News has moved from being a Wordpress application to a Jekyll static site developed directly on Github. Now you too can write an article, or a series of articles, by sending pull requests to the openSUSE/news-o-o repository.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/09

    During this week we released 4 snapshots (0220, 0222, 0224 and 0226) – an average week from that perspective, yet there have been some interesting and well-awaited updates in these snapshots: zsh 5.8 Mesa 19.3.4 & Mesa 20.0 libcap 2.32 GNOME 3.34.4 KDE Plasma 5.18.1 LLVM 6 has been removed from the repository ncurses 6.2 Linux kernel 5.5.5 Mozilla Firefox 73.0.1: it will now launch in Wayland mode inside a Wayland session MariaDB 10.4.12