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Movie Review: Snowden (2016)

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Movies
Reviews

As a Linux fan, one thing that dissapointed me was the use of way more Microsoft Windows and Mac OS in the computer screen shots... than Linux. Sure there was a ton of command line windows and text streaming by... but usually with a Windows logo at the bottom left corner. I don't think the word "Linux" was ever mentioned. One thing that was highly featured in the film was the"Electronic Frontier Foundation" (EFF) sticker Edward had on the back of his laptop. At times it almost felt like a commercial for the EFF... and that was a good thing.

I don't think I spoiled the movie too much and I highly recommend you go and see it. By the way, since we got such a late start, the cinama folks gave each audience member a free ticket to see another movie. That was awesome. Thanks Regal Gallatin Valley Cinemas 11!

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Paramount Wipes “Infringing” Ubuntu Torrent From Google

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GNU
Linux
Movies
Ubuntu

It's no secret that copyright holders are trying to take down as much pirated content as they can, but targeting open source software is not something we see every day. Paramount Pictures recently sent a DMCA takedown to Google, listing a copy of the popular operating system Ubuntu. An honest mistake, perhaps, but a worrying one.

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What If Linux Users Made Movies!

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GNU
Linux
Movies

I am just trying to imagine a few movies made by Linux lovers and for Linux loving audience. If such thing happens, what would be the movies look like? What would be their title?

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FOSS in Multimedia

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Movies
OSS
  • Organize your movie and TV files with tinyMediaManager

    The trouble with video files is that they are not easily parseable. How can your computer tell whether that 8 GB file in your ~/Movies folder is the latest superhero movie, or your daughter's soccer game?

    I consider myself an early adopter of digital content. I prefer a digital format, and since I consume a lot of independent content that doesn't have the budget for physical releases anyway, most of my purchases are digital files. I keep these on an NFS shared drive, and stream to Kodi or ncmpcpp, or whatever media client I happen to be using on any given Linux or Android device.

  • 6 reasons why Guayadeque is a music lover's open source player

    Recently I upgraded my laptop's Linux to the latest release, and I was surprised and saddened to discover that the wonderful music player Guayadeque seems to be considered as dead upstream, at least in Debian and Ubuntu. In a January blog post, the original author Juan Rios (@anonbeat) wrote that he is no longer able to support the code, which relies on outdated version of GStreamer 0.10. (When I asked about the status of Guayadeque on AskUbuntu, someone replied that it can now be built from source using the code on GitHub, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.)

  • Which open source audio player is your favorite?

Linux Filesystems

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Linux
Reiser
Movies
  • My assessment of “btrfs”

    In short: Novelist Stephen Elliott (James Franco) find himself drawn to the high-profile Hans Reiser (Christian Slater) murder trial - a case that brings him closer to his own troubled past with father (Ed Harris). Amber Heard, Wilmer Valderrama and Cynthia Nixon also star. (Watch the trailer)

  • The Adderall Diaries

    While Romanowsky gamely tries to negotiate the same structural tricks as the book, which employed the Reiser case as a base camp from which the author could depart and return, in the film it feels more like a subplot despite the cinematic tricks -- the cross-cutting and slo-mo flashbacks -- that the director uses to try to connect the stories. At times it feels flat, other times risible, and only occasionally do the stories resonate in any kind of harmony.

  • My assessment of “btrfs”

    Short version — I will continue to use “ext4” in future installs.

    Note that this a personal view, not a recommendation. My own choice depends on how I use computers and my practices for backup, recovery, etc. Your practices are likely different. Much of this post will be about my considerations in deciding against “btrfs” for my own use.

[via Susan]

FOSS in Multimedia

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Movies
OSS

OpenShot 2.0 Beta 4

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Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.0 Free Video Editor Now Features a Universal Linux Version

    It looks like the OpenShot 2.0 free and cross-platform video editor might be released this year after all, and today we're informing you about the availability of the fourth Beta build.

  • OpenShot 2.0 - Beta 4 Released!

    One of the biggest challenges for testers and myself is to speed up the cycle from bug fix to testable release. While some users compile everything manually, and some Linux users get updates delivered through our PPA, Windows, Mac, and certain Linux users must wait for me to create a new installer (which takes lots of time). So, I have built a cross-platform build server (i.e. really just a cool Python script which is scheduled to run every few hours). It checks Git for updates, re-compiles libraries, freezes the OpenShot Python 3 application (along with dependencies), signs the Windows / Mac versions, and uploads the files to Amazon S3, and lists these files on the openshot.org website. I currently have 3 build servers running (Windows 10, OS X 10.11, Ubuntu 14.04) and creating builds automatically.

  • OpenShot 2.0 Beta 4 Released

    While OpenShot 2.0 is long overdue, things are finally looking up for this open-source non-linear video editor with going into beta this past January and today marking the release of the fourth beta.

Popular Hollywood Movies that Utilizes Linux

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Linux
Movies

Hollywood, with all its glitz and glamour, seems like the last place you'll find the mighty penguin's influence. Well thankfully for all Linux fans, the truth is quite the opposite. The open source operating system has played a key role in turning many directorial dreams into silver screen successes. What attracts the billion-dollar industry to this 'free as in free beer' operating system is not its price. In fact, it is Linux's unmatched performance is what makes it the preferred choice over some of the top-of-the-line operating systems like Windows and Mac OS X.

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MPlayer 1.3.0 Release

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Software
Movies
  • MPlayer 1.3.0 released
  • MPlayer 1.3.0 Officially Released

    MPlayer 1.3.0 was released today by the team working on this widely-used, open-source video player.

    The release team announced MPlayer 1.3.0 as the new version today that is now compatible with FFmpeg 3.0.

  • MPlayer 1.3 Open Source Video Player Out Now with FFmpeg 3.0 Support

    After only three weeks of the announcement of the MPlayer 1.2 open-source video player software, the project's development team today, February 16, 2016, unveiled the MPlayer 1.3 release.

    As reported by us yesterday, February 15, the FFmpeg 3.0 open-source multimedia framework made a surprise appearance and brought in a great number of new features, so the biggest new feature of MPlayer 1.3 is, of course, support for FFmpeg 3.0.

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today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India