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HandBrake 1.0.0

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Movies
OSS
  • HandBrake 1.0.0 Released

    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake Team is delighted to present HandBrake 1.0.0. Thank you to all of our many contributors over the years for making HandBrake what it is today.

    We again remind everyone that the HandBrake Website is the only official source for HandBrake. Downloads are not mirrored on any third-party services, excepting the Linux PPA. For more information on downloading and installing HandBrake safely, please read Where to get HandBrake.

  • HandBrake 1.0 OSS Video Transcoder Released: VP9 & Opus Support

    HandBrake 1.0 is rather a big release for those in need of video transcoding on Linux/Windows/macOS systems. To learn more about all of the HandBrake 1.0 changes, see the official release announcement at handbrake.fr.

OpenShot 2.2

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Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.2 Released | 4K Video Editing!

    Happy Holidays to all the OpenShot supporters around the world! I am very proud to announce the latest and greatest release of OpenShot (version 2.2) has just arrived, and is ready to edit all your holiday videos! It’s faster, more stable, and better than ever!

  • OpenShot 2.2 Video Editor Debuts: Faster Performance, Better 4K/5K Video Editing

    In case you plan to do any video editing for your 2016 holiday videos and are deciding between the different open-source non-linear video editors, OpenShot 2.2 was released this morning as a sizable feature update.

    OpenShot 2.2 delivers on performance improvements (for some operations, more than 10x faster than the previous release), editing HD videos (1080p / 4K / 5K) is vastly improved, there is a new caching engine, stability improvements, keyframe enhancements, better error handling, new title templates, and various bug fixes.

25 years of Linux in 5 minutes

Filed under
Linux
Movies

Jeremy Garcia of LinuxQuestions.org and Bad Voltage (a podcast) delivers 25 years of Linux in five minutes: starting with Linux's first steps as "just a hobby" for creator Linus Torvalds, to its staggering popularity today with 135,000 developers from more than 1,300 companies and 22 million lines of code .

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Also: Watch now: 5 minute videos on Linux and more

Linux Kernels 4.8.10 and 4.4.34 LTS Out Now, Add SPARC64 and Networking Fixes

Fedora 25 Multimedia

Filed under
Red Hat
Movies

More on End of Mythbuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies
Ubuntu
  • Official Ubuntu Flavor Mythbuntu Linux Is Dead. What About My TV Shows?
  • Mythbuntu Linux Is No More, the Distribution Has Been Officially Discontinued

    Earlier today, November 5, 2016, the team behind the Mythbuntu GNU/Linux distribution sadly announced that the project has been discontinued effective immediately and no new releases will be made.

    Mythbuntu was an operating system based on the widely-used Ubuntu Linux distro and built around the MythTV free and open source digital video recorder (DVR) project. It was an official Ubuntu flavor and used Xfce4 as default desktop environment. The first release of the OS was back when Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) was announced, and the last one was Mythbuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • Mythbuntu: So Long and Thanks for All the Fish

    Mythbuntu as a separate distribution will cease to exist. We will take the necessary steps to pull Mythbuntu specific packages from the repositories (17.04 and later) unless someone steps up to take these packages over. MythTV packages in the official repositories and the Mythbuntu PPA will continue to be available and updated at their current rate.

Open Source Hardware

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Movies

Movie Review: Snowden (2016)

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Movies
Reviews

As a Linux fan, one thing that dissapointed me was the use of way more Microsoft Windows and Mac OS in the computer screen shots... than Linux. Sure there was a ton of command line windows and text streaming by... but usually with a Windows logo at the bottom left corner. I don't think the word "Linux" was ever mentioned. One thing that was highly featured in the film was the"Electronic Frontier Foundation" (EFF) sticker Edward had on the back of his laptop. At times it almost felt like a commercial for the EFF... and that was a good thing.

I don't think I spoiled the movie too much and I highly recommend you go and see it. By the way, since we got such a late start, the cinama folks gave each audience member a free ticket to see another movie. That was awesome. Thanks Regal Gallatin Valley Cinemas 11!

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Paramount Wipes “Infringing” Ubuntu Torrent From Google

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies
Ubuntu

It's no secret that copyright holders are trying to take down as much pirated content as they can, but targeting open source software is not something we see every day. Paramount Pictures recently sent a DMCA takedown to Google, listing a copy of the popular operating system Ubuntu. An honest mistake, perhaps, but a worrying one.

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What If Linux Users Made Movies!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

I am just trying to imagine a few movies made by Linux lovers and for Linux loving audience. If such thing happens, what would be the movies look like? What would be their title?

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Games: Descenders, War Thunder’s “The Valkyries”

Kernel: Virtme, 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference and Linux Foundation Articles

  • Virtme: The kernel developers' best friend
    When working on the Linux Kernel, testing via QEMU is pretty common. Many virtual drivers have been recently merged, useful either to test the kernel core code, or your application. These virtual drivers make QEMU even more attractive.
  • 2018 Linux Audio Miniconference
    As in previous years we’re trying to organize an audio miniconference so we can get together and talk through issues, especially design decisons, face to face. This year’s event will be held on Sunday October 21st in Edinburgh, the day before ELC Europe starts there.
  • How Writing Can Expand Your Skills and Grow Your Career [Ed: Linux Foundation article]
    At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, I participated in a panel discussion called How Writing can Change Your Career for the Better (Even if You don't Identify as a Writer. The panel was moderated by Rikki Endsley, Community Manager and Editor for Opensource.com, and it included VM (Vicky) Brasseur, Open Source Strategy Consultant; Alex Williams, Founder, Editor in Chief, The New Stack; and Dawn Foster, Consultant, The Scale Factory.
  • At the Crossroads of Open Source and Open Standards [Ed: Another Linux Foundation article]
    A new crop of high-value open source software projects stands ready to make a big impact in enterprise production, but structural issues like governance, IPR, and long-term maintenance plague OSS communities at every turn. Meanwhile, facing significant pressures from open source software and the industry groups that support them, standards development organizations are fighting harder than ever to retain members and publish innovative standards. What can these two vastly different philosophies learn from each other, and can they do it in time to ensure they remain relevant for the next 10 years?

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.