Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Movies

Kodi 17 "Krypton" Media Center Gets Its Last Update, Kodi 18 "Leia" Coming Next

Filed under
Movies

Kodi 17.6 has been released today as the last minor bugfix update to the Krypton series, bringing a fix for a crash that could occur in the Controller dialog, updates the standard scrapers to their lastest versions available at the moment of writing, as well as a fix for some connection issues that could occur with the internal web server.

It also fixes a crash when the peripheral joystick add-on is disabled, and probably other minor issues that haven't been added to today's release notes, which mention the fact that from now on the upcoming Kodi 18 "Leia" series will be put in the spotlight and will receive more honorable mentions during its development cycle.

Read more

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.0 RELEASE

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.0 provides a mid-year bump to improve hardware support on Intel and Raspberry Pi hardware. It also resolves minor support issues on a range of devices and fixes a number of important security issues affecting the core OS reported in recent months. Kodi is bumped to 17.5, and Samba bumps to 4.6 which brings support for SMB2/3 to LibreELEC for the first time. PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below before posting an issue in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Samba, Lirc and Tvheadend.

Read more

Kodi 17.5 Media Center Released with Support for FFmpeg 3.1.11, Retina Devices

Filed under
Software
Movies

Two months after the 17.4 point release, the Kodi team announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the Kodi 17.5 maintenance update with a handful of bug fixes.

While not a major update, Kodi 17.5 adds support for the FFMpeg 3.1.11 open-source multimedia backend, as well as Retina support for Apple's devices, improves power message handling for CEC, enables playback of DVD files over network on GNU/Linux systems, and fixes the up/download buttons of IR remotes for Apple's macOS High Sierra 10.13.

Read more

Lakka 2.1 RC5 released with improved Dolphin support and experimental ASUS TinkerBoard support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

We are proud to announce the release of Lakka 2.1 RC5!

This version required a lot of team work. We merged LibreELEC 8.2 Bêta changes in Lakka. RetroArch also got updated, as well as all the emulators and other libretro cores.

Ntemis added support for some Rockchip boards, including the ASUS Tinkerboard. These new images are still experimental.

Read more

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.2 BETA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

This is the third beta for our 8.2 release. It addresses minor findings related to the Samba bump: we now detect and avoid invalid Samba v3 configurations, old samba.conf.sample templates are overwritten with the new v4 template, and remote SMB shares are mounted using SMB2 or where possible SMB3. The release also adds support for the Raspberry Pi IQAudIO Digi+ board and a Xiaomi BT remote, and includes security fixes for the Blueborne Linux/BlueZ vulnerability. This is hopefully the final 8.1.x beta release; next will be 8.2.0.

Read more

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.1 BETA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

This is the second BETA of our 8.2 release; a mid-year version bump to enhance hardware support and capabilities. This beta addresses issues in our OVA image, a Broadcom WIFI firmware vulnerability for Raspberry Pi 3 and Zero W users, and MPEG issues seen with some nVidia cards. It also adds support for the inexpensive Xbox ONE (DVB-C/T/T2) USB tuner (about €12 on eBay), and LibreELEC settings gains new options for changing the embedded Samba server Workgroup and adjusting the SMB protocol versions supported for security and SMB share compatibility. Kodi is bumped to 17.4 final.

Read more

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.0 BETA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

This is a BETA of our 8.2 release; a mid-year bump to enhance hardware support and capabilities. It adds 10-bit HEVC support for recent Intel GPU generations, Samba 4.6 which brings support for SMB2/SMB3, and several SSL issues are resolved in a switch to OpenSSL. We continue to refine firmware we embed; removing old and unused files to reduce image size while adding new drivers and firmwares based on team findings and user reports. Kodi is updated to 17.4-RC1 with minor bugfixes since v17.3.

Read more

OpenShot 2.3.2

Filed under
Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released

    Version 2.3.2 has been released this evening, and it addresses a few big issues.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Video Editor Released

    OpenShot 2.3.2 fixes a crash during undo/redo operations, another crash was fixed with the transform tool, better libopenshot version handling, a smaller package size, and a variety of other fixes.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released with Various Bug Fixes

    A new release of the open-source video editor OpenShot is available to download. The update fixes 'a few big issues', according to its developer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

More on Tesla's Compliance

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more