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Reviews

Discovering Linux - The Experiences of a Linux Newbie

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The concept of open-source, free software is very appealing. Many of the Linux-distros are very good, but I still haven't found one that fits my needs perfectly. Also, my needs will propably change as I become more aquainted to Linux. At this time, my favourite distro is propably Mandriva One, though it would've been Ubuntu if they had had support for restricted formats.

In praise of KANOTIX -- A biased introduction

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There are almost too many Linux distros to count, and many live Linux CDs. So what is KANOTIX, and what's so great about it?

The Break-Up: Not a good date movie

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Although The Break-up is laced with wit and charm throughout, the theme and ultimate outcome make it not the best flick to take a date. Vince Vaughn and Jennifer Aniston star.

Cars - The Must-See Movie of the Summer?

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I, along with most of the country, enjoyed the new Disney/Pixar release of the summer. The movie was great, but the commericalization and over-saturation are lowering the "cute" factor for me.

The Omen (2006)

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The new remake of The Omen that hit theaters last weekend was a great disappointment. It lacked the suspense and biting "horror" found in the original.

YaST (Yet another SUSE 10.1 RC2 Trial), Part 2

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Installing Xgl on Suse 10.1 RC2 couldn't be simpler. It does require video acceleration; typically, that means using an nVidia or ATI graphics card with the manufacturer's proprietary drivers installed (see the Xgl page on the Suse wiki for more information).

YaST (Yet another SUSE 10.1 RC2 Trial), Part 1

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Even though I swore I'd keep Fedora Core around for a while, it only took 3 months before I replaced it with Suse (again). It's all Xgl's fault. The Kororaa Live CD is very cool. Since Xgl was created by a Novell engineer, and there are Xgl binaries for Suse, and since Suse is coming out with a new version, and (fintally!) since Xgl hasn't made it into Debian Sid yet, it made sense to install Suse to use as an Xgl testbed.

To 64 or Not to 64, That Was the Question

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With my nice new motherboard & cpu, I've been quite anxious to test some of my new-found powers. My first thought after the hardware installation was: Gentoo 64-bit! By way of testing, I installed the 64-bit version of SuSE 10.1 rc1 yesterday and had planned on writing this wonderfully informative comparison article of it and the 32-bit version. I was expecting the 64-bit to smoke 32 and had even made preliminary reads into installing the 64-bit version of Gentoo. Since this was my first foray into the world of 64-bit, I expected to be lost and confused. Well, the former may not have come to fruition, but the latter certainly did.

Frugalware 0.3 - getting there!

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Frugalware strives to combine simplicity of distros like Slackware or Arch with ease of configuration and use. It adopted Packman (from Arch Linux) as its package manager, and is compiled for i686 architecture. I've been following the progress of this project from their very first release and I really wanted to like it because the concept appealed to me, but until now I found it plagued by various small and not so small problems that would quickly turn me off. So I am very happy to report it appears that things have come together this time and Frugalware is starting to live up to its potential.

Ultima Linux: Ultimate Disappointment

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I'm not sure this can be classified as much a review as a rant. This is why I'll file this as a blog instead of a news/review. I love slackware, I've stated that numerous times. In fact one of my first reviews here at Tuxmachines was on slackware. So why is it that more times than not when someone goes to try and "improve" upon slackware, it just makes a mess.

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Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

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