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Reviews

Dark Water & Charlie & Choc Factory

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I saw Dark Water last weekend and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory this weekend and this is what I think about these latest productions in theaters now.

Recent Review Rounds

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I've had some successes and not so successful adventures. I got stampeded by Buffalo, a distro whose name intrigued me. I didn't achieve any yingyang with Zen, whose logo was so darn cute. And my fruit went sour with Berry, whose motif was quite appetizing.

My latest efforts are with Lunar. After I finally discovered the commands Lunar uses to install software, I was on my way. I didn't tweak any compile flags or set up distcc, but it's still kinda neato to watch it compile up your applications from scratch. I don't think Lunar is for everyone, as it's taken a little coaxing at times, but i got xorg and the kde desktop installed and running, as well as xawtv!

I been Buffalo'd

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Buffalo Linux 1.7.3 was released on May 10 and it sounded quite interesting. I'd visted their website a couple times in the past but never installed this oddly named distro. Now with the site up and running I thought the time was right.

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 2

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My month with Fluxbox can almost be officially over and it's time to report on my experiences as promised. I wish I had a long list of complaints to file or problems for which I had to find answers or even less than compelling reasons to run back to KDE (i.e. something interesting or controversial to write about). But the truth is, it sat back there serving up my windows and never once gave me reason to even notice it was there. And that's a good thing.

Mini Distro Round-Up

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Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64

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Submitted by Anonymous

Anonymous writes, "It took about 10-12 minutes to install. I selected the default installation. You need all 3 cd's if you are doing the default install though it appears to only need 3-4 packages from the 3rd cd.

Boot up speed was about the same as the x86 version. The noticable difference came after logging into the desktop. This is where you begin to notice the speed difference from accessing the menus to launching applications.

KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

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I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

Cooker (Mandrake 10.2b3) Woes

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Since my not-so-kind review of Mandrake's latest beta release, I've been trying in vain to update to the latest cooker in hopes of putting out a more positive review for them given their popularity and loyalty of users. The issues I mentioned were not isolated to my install and I've been hoping for some fixes.

Slackware 10.1

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On February 7 Slackware released its 10.1 version of its famous linux distribution. With the death of one of my harddrives the other night and the resulting loss of 10.0, I finally found the time to give it a try.

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