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Howtos

The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key

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Howtos

Knoppix, the famous live Linux CD that practically started the live CD trend, needs no introduction to most people. One of the things that's so great about it is that you can take it with you and boot to a familiar Linux environment on almost any modern computer, without touching the OS that's already installed on it.

Backup Options for Linux secured (encrypted), and not secured

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Howtos

Backup your server, is always good as all of us knows, anyway is not always done as often as it should do. Here you will find some different methods to backup your system full or partial.

So should not be any more excuses of not backing up the data.

Backup Methods for Linux

The Magic of Simultaneous Contrast

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Howtos

The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to the idea of simultaneous contrast and to the amazing effects of color interactions. Color is the single most important tool that artists and designers used throughout the ages to beautify their environment. But to use color effectively one has to understand its basic functions, its psychological and visual impacts on the environment.

Managing 4D Chart Documents and Windows

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Howtos

4D Chart documents can be created in plug-in areas on forms or in separate plug-in windows. Here we show you how to create, open, and save 4D Chart documents in both types of areas.
This article explains the basics of managing 4D Chart documents,including:

MiniTutor: MPlayer and Video Output

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Howtos

The MPlayer, Linux Movie Player, is an extraordinary video and audio player, and it has hundreds of options to use in order to do everything we wish to an audio or video file, one of these fantastic options are used to video output.

Minitutor from: GoblinX Minitutors

Howto: ATI fglrx driver + Xgl + compiz on Debian Sid for KDE users

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A how-to on manually installing Xgl and compiz on Debian Sid, for KDE users, with the proprietary ATI graphics driver ("fglrx").

Grsecurity Patched Kernel Install Script For Redhat based Pentium 4 servers

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Howtos

After a lil work getting the config right for s hosting/shell server I finally came up with the script that will patch, compile, and install the gresecurity patched kernel. You just run the shell script and it will download the kernel and patch, patch the kernel, download the config, and then compile and install.

The config I got made up is for Pentium4/Xeon/Celeron based servers.

Fix Apf ipt_state error on new kernels

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For those using apf on the new kernels and getting ipt_state error, since 2.6.15 they changed the name of them kernel modules and apf does not recognize them. Do not enable monokern as some people suggest, this will screw up your passive ftp and will not work good

GrSecurity Kernel Script

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GrSecurity kernel upgrade and patch script. Downloads the 2.6.17.7 kernel and the latest grsecurity patch and then unpacks and patches the kernel, after that it tells you what to do next.

Mod Security rules.

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After extenisve testing I have found what I think are the best mod security rules you can have for a basic server with average php scripts.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

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    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.

GNU: GLIBC and GCC News

  • Recent GNU* C library improvements
    As technology advancements continue, the core technology must be updated with new ideas that break paradigms and enable innovation. Linux* systems are based on two main core technologies: the Linux Kernel project and the GNU C Library (GLIBC) project. The GLIBC project provides the core libraries for the GNU system and GNU/Linux systems, as well as many other systems that use Linux as the kernel. These libraries provide interfaces that allow programs to manipulate and manage files, memory, threads and other operating system objects. The release of GLIBC version 2.27 marks a new step on the Linux technology roadmap, with major new features that will allow Linux developers to create and enhance applications. This blog post describes several key new features and how to use them.
  • What Makes GLIBC 2.27 Exciting To The Clear Linux Folks
    Released at the beginning of February was Glibc 2.27 and it's comprised of a lot of new features and performance improvements. But what's the best of Glibc 2.27? One of the Clear Linux developers at Intel, Victor Rodriguez Bahena, put out a blog post this week outlining some of the most exciting features for this GNU C Library update. While most Linux distributions tend to be conservative in rolling out new GLIBC updates, Clear Linux is already on v2.27 and even had back-ported some of the performance patches prior to the official 2.27 debut.
  • GCC 8 Will Let You -march=native Correctly On ARM/AArch64
    Linux developers and enthusiasts on x86_64 have long enjoyed the ability to use the -march=native option for having the GCC compiler attempt to auto-detect the CPU and set the appropriate microarchitecture flags. That support is finally being offered up for ARM with GCC 8. This week -march=native now works on AArch64 as well as for ARM in general too.

Open Source Color Management is broken

Since I am now in the business of photography and image processing (see my travel photography blog here), I thought it was time to finally get proper monitors and calibrate them. I wanted to do this with Open Source tools and use the calibration data for my Linux desktop, so I ordered a ColorHug2 colorimeter, which is Open Hardware compliant and all the tools are FOSS licensed. And from then on everything just went downhill. Read more