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Howtos

How to rename files in bulk

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Howtos

Consider this common scenario. A directory contains multiple files that are named using a common convention: for example, image-001.png, image-002.png, image-003.png, etc. You want to rename the files to, say, upload-001.png, upload-002.png, upload-003.png, etc.

The coders among us can write a bash script to automate the process. For expedience, this post shows how to use the built-in rename command to achieve the same goal.

Fixing OpenSuse’s Dog Awful default fonts…

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Howtos

Lets not beat around the bush here, the default font rendering in OpenSuse and the default font do not an OS fit for reading make.. this can be fixed however..

Love or hate Ubuntu, out of the box it has one of the best font rendering setups of any distro and considering how much time we spend on our PC’s setting your fonts up correctly is one less headach, literally.

I’m not sure how much of these instructions I got right, however after a reboot the screen text does at least look better..

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Stopping Screen Flickering on Ivy Bridge Laptops using Linux

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Howtos

This is a solution to a problem which has been dogging me on every version of Linux I install on the Acer Aspire S3. I'm hoping it will help someone.

Read my solution

Forgot your Ubuntu Password? All is not lost.

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Howtos

It’s always a pain when you forget your password, and i’ve often done it on an Ubuntu install. All however is not lost as a stock Ubuntu install its quite easy to reset your password

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Creating an AD Server for Free using Ubuntu and Samba

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Howtos

While being a huge fan of the GNU/Linux OS I do also live in the real world which means using Active Directory Domain Controllers and Windows networks. this week however I’ve had to build for a project a stand alone AD network. This got me thinking to a project I built for a school 6 uears ago which I did the same thing with Samba on Fedora.

Remote Application launching using X11 and SSH.. Oldie but a goodie..

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Howtos

Using WordPress as my central blog platform I’m very happy with it, not much to complain about, some good features, it’s very social and some nice themes. However it’s got me thinking not so much my content i’m now having a “problem” to manage it’s dealing with the replies

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Using the right tools to get your media..

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Howtos

When it comes to getting what you want off the interent, its pretty fair to say, that there is an application and a set of instructions to do this. In this day and age its fair to say that getting media off the web should be the way that media companies distribute. Instead of trying to reinvent the wheel. Unfortunately they don't they bog you down with Websites, DRM, Magma and lots more.. Well This is how to get your media another way..

Standard Disclaimer: Your use of this software and configuration is at your own risk. Check the legality of downloading TV shows in your area. This post is purely for the sake of information.

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Big Bear's Helpful Hints-Google Docs Spreadsheets

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Howtos

I like to jot down things that I learn how to do on the spur of the moment so that I can find it later.

I admit, in the 80's there was quite of bit of "herbal remedy" usage and my short term memory isn't what it could be. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I've decided that I might as well potentially help some other folks who might want to know about some of the things I discover, so I thought why not here?

For my very first post, I wanted to figure out how to sum cells across multiple pages in Google Docs spreadsheets.

How to get APT to work through a proxy..

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Howtos

APT is the core of package management on Debian based systems, its a powerful suite of tools for getting and managing packages onto the system.

As powerful as the Apt suite is, it has problems as I found out this week working through a proxy server. Something i've recently implemented.

Read How...

How do i get the ethernet cards to come up automatically on CentOS/RedHat/Fedora ?

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Having recently installed a CentOS 6 minimal server i was concerned that the network cards even after running the system network config tool didn't come up after a reboot. Took a few minutes, but i figured out why..

Find Out how to auto mount the Network Cards...

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How Java has stood the test of time

Java initially appeared in 1995, evolving from a 1991 innovation called "Oak." It was apparently the right time for engineers looking to grow distributed systems. Some of the more popular languages back then — C, C++, and even Cobol for some efforts — involved steep learning curves. Java's multi-threading, allowing the concurrent execution of two or more parts of a program, ended the struggle to get multi-tasking working. Java quickly became the de facto language for mission-critical systems. Since that time, new languages have come and gone, but Java has remained entrenched and hard to replace. In fact, Java has stood as one of the top two computing languages practically since its initial appearance, as this Top Programming Languages article suggests. Read more

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Kernel and Graphics: Linux I/O Schedulers, Btrfs, Intel, Mesa 18.3.1 and More

  • Linux I/O Schedulers
    The Linux kernel I/O schedulers attempt to balance the need to get the best possible I/O performance while also trying to ensure the I/O requests are "fairly" shared among the I/O consumers.  There are several I/O schedulers in Linux, each try to solve the I/O scheduling issues using different mechanisms/heuristics and each has their own set of strengths and weaknesses. For traditional spinning media it makes sense to try and order I/O operations so that they are close together to reduce read/write head movement and hence decrease latency.  However, this reordering means that some I/O requests may get delayed, and the usual solution is to schedule these delayed requests after a specific time.   Faster non-volatile memory devices can generally handle random I/O requests very easily and hence do not require reordering.
  • Btrfs Restoring Support For Swap Files With Linux 4.21
    The Btrfs file-system hasn't supported Swap files on it in early a decade, but that support will be restored again with the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel.  Btrfs hasn't supported Swap files on it since 2009 thus making swap partitions necessary unless having a mix of file-systems on your box (or not caring about any swap capabilities), but now with Linux 4.21 that support will be restored for allowing swap files to be reside on Btrfs.
  • Intel's IWD Linux Wireless Daemon 0.13 Adds Opportunistic Wireless Encryption
    Intel's promising IWD open-source wireless daemon continues picking up additional functionality in its trek towards potentially replacing wpa_supplicant. Out this week is IWD 0.13.  With the IWD 0.13 release there are fixes as well as support for Opportunistic Wireless Encryption and support for the common EAP-TLS framework.
  • Intel Developing "oneAPI" For Optimized Code Across CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs & More
    Intel's 2018 Architecture Day was primarily focused on the company's hardware architecture road-map, but one of the software (pre)announcements was their oneAPI software stack. 
  • Intel Working On Open-Sourcing The FSP - Would Be Huge Win For Coreboot & Security
    Intel's Architecture Day on Tuesday was delightfully filled with an overwhelming amount of valuable hardware information, but Intel's software efforts were also briefly touched on too. In fact, Raja Koduri reinforced how software is a big part of Intel technology and goes in-hand with their security, interconnect, memory, architecture, and process pillars and that's where their new oneAPI initiative will fit in. But what learning afterwards was most exciting on the software front.
  • Linux Is Already In Good Shape For The New Features Of Intel Gen11 Graphics & Icelake
    Besides seeing Icelake demos at the Intel Architecture Day that were running on Ubuntu, with closely tracking the Linux kernel's development most of the new features presented for Sunny Cove and Gen11 graphics have already been merged or at least available in patch form for some months within the Linux ecosystem. Here's a look at the features talked about yesterday and their state on Linux.
  • Intel Details Gen11 Graphics & Sunny Cove For Icelake
    At Intel's architecture day, the company finally detailed their "Gen 11" graphics that we've been seeing open-source Linux graphics driver patches for many months (Intel OTC posted their initial open-source display driver code in early January and has continued the enablement work since) albeit elusive in substantive user details and hardware until Icelake. But today at least we can share more about the significant improvements with Gen11 graphics.
  • mesa 18.3.1
    This version disables the VK_EXT_pci_bus_info extension due to last minute issues spotted in the specification.
  • Mesa 18.3.1 Released To Disable Botched Vulkan Extension
    Mesa 18.3 was released less than a week ago while today Mesa 18.3.1 was issued due to an error in the Vulkan specification. The motivating factor for this quick Mesa 18.3.1 release was to disable the VK_EXT_pci_bus_info extension that had just been introduced weeks ago. The Vulkan working group mistakenly assumed that PCI domains are 16-bit even though they could potentially be 32-bit values. The next Vulkan spec update will change the relevant structure to be 32-bit, which is a backwards-incompatible change.
  • High resolution wheel scrolling on Linux v4.21
    Most wheel mice have a physical feature to stop the wheel from spinning freely. That feature is called detents, notches, wheel clicks, stops, or something like that. On your average mouse that is 24 wheel clicks per full rotation, resulting in the wheel rotating by 15 degrees before its motion is arrested. On some other mice that angle is 18 degrees, so you get 20 clicks per full rotation. Of course, the world wouldn't be complete without fancy hardware features. Over the last 10 or so years devices have added free-wheeling scroll wheels or scroll wheels without distinct stops. In many cases wheel behaviour can be configured on the device, e.g. with Logitech's HID++ protocol. A few weeks back, Harry Cutts from the chromium team sent patches to enable Logitech high-resolution wheel scrolling in the kernel. Succinctly, these patches added another axis next to the existing REL_WHEEL named REL_WHEEL_HI_RES. Where available, the latter axis would provide finer-grained scroll information than the click-by-click REL_WHEEL. At the same time I accidentally stumbled across the documentation for the HID Resolution Multiplier Feature. A few patch revisions later and we now have everything queued up for v4.21. Below is a summary of the new behaviour. The kernel will continue to provide REL_WHEEL as axis for "wheel clicks", just as before. This axis provides the logical wheel clicks, (almost) nothing changes here. In addition, a REL_WHEEL_HI_RES axis is available which allows for finer-grained resolution. On this axis, the magic value 120 represents one logical traditional wheel click but a device may send a fraction of 120 for a smaller motion. Userspace can either accumulate the values until it hits a full 120 for one wheel click or it can scroll by a few pixels on each event for a smoother experience. The same principle is applied to REL_HWHEEL and REL_HWHEEL_HI_RES for horizontal scroll wheels (which these days is just tilting the wheel). The REL_WHEEL axis is now emulated by the kernel and simply sent out whenever we have accumulated 120.
  • Nouveau Lands Initial Open-Source NVIDIA Turing Support - But No GPU Acceleration
    Just in time for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel, the developers working on the reverse-engineered, open-source support for NVIDIA GeForce RTX "Turing" GPUs have published their preliminary code. But before getting too excited, there isn't GPU hardware acceleration working yet. Ben Skeggs of Red Hat spearheaded this enablement work. He's got the initial support working right now for the TU104 and TU106 chipsets, but not yet TU102 due to hardware access. The TU106 is the RTX 2060/2070 series while the TU104 is the GeForce RTX 2080 and the TU102 is the RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX. Back on launch day the Nouveau community crew started their Turing reverse-engineering work. NVIDIA doesn't support nor hinder the Nouveau driver work, though these days do sample hardware to the developers and are occasionally able to answer technical questions for them.