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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Making a Case for Security Analytics

    Being a victim of a data breach no longer results in a slap on the wrist. Instead it can lead to costly fines, job loss, physical damage and an organization's massive loss of reputation. Case in point: Target. Following its high-profile breach in late 2013, Target suffered large losses in market valuation and paid more than $100 million in damages.

  • GoToMyPC password hack – urgent, change passwords NOW

    If you use the popular Citrix GoToMyPC remote access product for macOS, Windows, Kindle, iOS, and Android you will need to change all passwords now.

  • Web Application Defender's Field Report: Account Takeover Campaigns Spotlight

    ATO attacks (also known as credential stuffing) use previously breached username and password pairs to automate login attempts. This data may have been previously released on public dumpsites such as Pastebin or directly obtained by attackers through web application attacks such as SQLi. The goal of the attacks is to identify valid login credential data that can then be sold to gain fraudulent access to user accounts. ATO may be considered a subset of brute force attacks, however it is an increasing threat because it is harder to identify such attacks through traditional individual account authentication errors. The Akamai Threat Research Team analyzed web login transactions for one week across our customer base to identify ATO attack campaigns.

  • Google's security princess talks cybersecurity

    Her talk was even-keeled, informative, and included strong FOSS messaging about everyone's vested interest in internet security and privacy. After the talk was done, I watched her take audience questions (long enough for me to take a short conference call) where she patiently and handily fielded all manner of queries from up and down the stack.

BusyBotNet is a Fork of Busybox with Security Tools

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OSS
Security

Busybox provides a lightweight version of common command line utilities normally found on “big” Linux into a single binary, in order to bring them to embedded systems with limited memory and storage. As more and more embedded systems are now connected to the Internet, or as they are called nowadays the Internet of Things nodes, adding security tools, such as cryptographic utilities, could prove useful for administrators of such system, and so BusyBotNet project wsa born out of a fork of Busybox.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late.

  • Let’s Encrypt Accidentally Spills 7,600 User Emails

    Certificate authority Let’s Encrypt accidentally disclosed the email addresses of several thousand of its users this weekend.

    Josh Aas, Executive Director for the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG), the nonprofit group that helped launch the CA, apologized for the error on Saturday. In what Let’s Encrypt dubbed a preliminary report posted shortly after it happened, Aas blamed the faux pas on a bug in the automated email system the group uses.

  • phpMyAdmin Project Successfully Completes Security Audit

    Software Freedom Conservancy congratulates its phpMyAdmin project on succesfuly completing completing a thorough security audit, as part of Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund. No serious issues were found in the phyMyAdmin codebase.

  • StartCom launches a new service - StartEncrypt

    StartCom, a leading global Certificate Authority (CA) and provider of trusted identity and authentication services, announces a new service – StartEncrypt today, an automatic SSL certificate issuance and installation software for your web server.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Mozilla Funds Open Source Code Audits

    As part of the Mozilla Open Source Support program (MOSS), the Mozilla Foundation has set up a fund dedicated to helping open source software projects eradicate code vulnerabilities.

  • Intel Hidden Management Engine – x86 Security Risk?

    So it seems the latest generation of Intel x86 CPUs have implemented a Intel hidden management engine that cannot be audited or examined. We can also assume at some point it will be compromised and security researchers are labelling this as a Ring -3 level vulnerability.

  • Smart detection for passive sniffing in the Tor-network

    If you haven't yet read about my previous research regarding finding bad exit nodes in the Tor network you can read it here. But the tl;dr is that I sent unique passwords through every exit node in the Tor network over HTTP. This meant that is was possible for the exit node to sniff the credentials and use them to login on my fake website which I had control over.

  • Lone hacker, not Russian spies, responsible for Democratic Party breach

    RED-FACED SECURITY OUTFIT CrowdStrike has admitted that the Russian government wasn't responsible for a hack on the Democratic Party after lone hacker Guccifer 2 claimed that he was responsible for the breach.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Thursday's security updates
  • Network Security: The Unknown Unknowns

    I recently thought of the apocryphal story about the solid reliability of the IBM AS/400 systems. I’ve heard several variations on the story, but as the most common version of the story goes, an IBM service engineer shows up at a customer site one day to service an AS/400. The hapless employees have no idea what the service engineer is talking about. Eventually the system is found in a closet or even sealed in a walled off space where it had been reliably running the business for years completely forgotten and untouched. From a reliability perspective, this is a great story. From a security perspective, it is a nightmare. It represents Donald Rumsfeld’s infamous “unknown unknowns” statement regarding the lack of evidence linking the government of Iraq with the supply of weapons of mass destruction to terrorist groups.

  • The average cost of a data breach is now $4 million

    The average data breach cost has grown to $4 million, representing a 29 percent increase since 2013, according to the Ponemon Institute.

  • The story of a DDoS extortion attack – how one company decided to take a stand [iophk: “yet another way that cracked MS machines are big money”]

    Instead of simply ordering his company to defend itself in conventional fashion he was going to write to all 5,000 of Computop’s customers and partners telling them that on 15 June his firm’s website was likely to be hit with a DDoS attack big enough to cause everyone serious problems.

pfSense 2.3.1 FreeBSD Firewall Gets New Update to Patch Web GUI Security Issues

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Security
BSD

Chris Buechler from pfSense announced earlier today, June 16, 2016, that there's a new maintenance update available for the pfSense 2.3.1 FreeBSD-based firewall distribution.

pfSense 2.3.1 Update 5 (2.3.1_5) is a small bugfix release for the pfSense 2.3.1 major update announced last month, and since pfSense now lets its maintainers update only individual parts of the system, we see more and more small builds like this one, which patch the most annoying issues.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • BadTunnel Bug Hijacks Network Traffic, Affects All Windows Versions

    The research of Yang Yu, founder of Tencent's Xuanwu Lab, has helped Microsoft patch a severe security issue in its implementation of the NetBIOS protocol that affected all Windows versions ever released.

  • 'BadTunnel' Bugs Left Every Microsoft Windows PC Vulnerable For 20 Years [Ed: no paywall/malware in this link]

    Microsoft is today closing off a vulnerability that one Chinese researcher claims has "probably the widest impact in the history of Windows." Every version of the Microsoft operating system going back to Windows 95 is affected, leaving anyone still running unsupported operating systems, such as XP, in danger of being surreptitiously surveilled.

    According to Yang Yu, founder of Tencent's Xuanwu Lab, the bug can be exploited silently with a "near-perfect success rate", as the problems lie in the design of Windows. The ultimate impact? An attacker can hijack all a target's web use, granting the hacker "Big Brother power", as soon as the victim opens a link or plugs in a USB stick, claimed Yu. He received $50,000 from Microsoft's bug bounty program for uncovering the weakness, which the researcher has dubbed BadTunnel. Microsoft issued a fix today in its Patch Tuesday list of updates.

    "Even security software equipped with active defense mechanisms are not able to detect the attack," Yu told FORBES. "Of course it is capable of execute malicious code on the target system if required."

  • Getting Things Wrong From The Beginning…

    GNU/Linux and never had any problems with software the rest of the school year. I’ve been using GNU/Linux ever since and have had no regrets. It’s been the right way to do IT. My wife saw the light a few years ago. She was tired of years of TOOS failing every now and then and needing re-installation. Once her business started using a web application, she had no more need of TOOS, none.

  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late.

  • Hackers Show How To Hack Anyone’s Facebook Account Just By Knowing Phone Number

    By exploiting the SS7 flaw, a hacker can hack someone’s Facebook account just by knowing the associated phone number. This flaw allows a hacker to divert the OTP code to his/her own phone and use it to access the victim’s Facebook account. The security researchers, who have explained the hack in a video, advise the users to avoid adding their phone numbers to the public services.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Russian government hackers penetrated DNC, stole opposition research on Trump [Ed: Microsoft Windows again]

    Russian government hackers penetrated the computer network of the Democratic National Committee and gained access to the entire database of opposition research on GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to committee officials and security experts who responded to the breach.

  • Bears in the Midst: Intrusion into the Democratic National Committee

    The COZY BEAR intrusion relied primarily on the SeaDaddy implant developed in Python and compiled with py2exe and another Powershell backdoor with persistence accomplished via Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) system, which allowed the adversary to launch malicious code automatically after a specified period of system uptime or on a specific schedule. The Powershell backdoor is ingenious in its simplicity and power. It consists of a single obfuscated command setup to run persistently, such as...

  • Big data will fix internet security ... eventually [Ed: Microsoft’s Grimes says mass surveillance (‘big data’) will fix Internet security eventually]

    I’ve always thought that improved computer security controls would “fix” the internet and stop persistent criminality -- turns out it might be big data analytics instead.

  • Symantec dons a Blue Coat [Ed: two evil companies are now one]

    Symantec will pay US$4.65 billion in an all-cash deal to buy privately-held Blue Coat to ramp up its enterprise security offerings.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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MediaTek launched the fastest open-spec SBC to date with a 96Boards development board that runs Android on its deca-core Cortex-A53 and -A72 Helio X20 SoC. The “Helio X20 Development Board” is MediaTek’s first 96Boards form-factor single-board computer, and the most powerful open-spec hacker SBC to date. Although we’ve seen some fast 64-bit SoCs among 96Boards SBCs, such as the HiKey, based on an octa-core, Cortex-A53 HiSilicon Kirin 6220, the Helio X20 Development Board offers an even more powerful Helio X20 system-on-chip processor. Read more

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • New projects, security, and more OpenStack news
  • LibreOffice 5.1.4 Released with Over 130 Fixes
    The first release candidate represented 123 fixes. Some include a fix for a crash in Impress when setting a background image. This occurred with several popular formats in Windows and Linux. Caolán McNamara submitted the patches to fix this in the 5.1 and 5.2 branches. David Tardon fixed a bug where certain presentations hung Impress for extended periods to indefinitely by checking for preconditions earlier. Laurent Balland-Poirier submitted the patches to fix a user-defined cell misinterpretation when using semicolon inside quotes.
  • Open source. Open science. Open Ocean. Oceanography for Everyone and the OpenCTD
    Nearly four years ago, Kersey Sturdivant and I launched a bold, ambitious, and, frankly, naive crowdfunding initiative to build the first low-cost, open-source CTD, a core scientific instrument that measures salinity, temperature, and depth in a water column. It was a dream born from the frustration of declining science funding, the expense of scientific equipment, and the promise of the Maker movement. After thousands of hours spent learning the skills necessary to build these devices, hundreds of conversations with experts, collaborators, and potential users around the world, dozens of iterations (some transformed into full prototypes, others that exist solely as software), and one research cruise on Lake Superior to test the housing and depth and temperature probes, the OpenCTD has arrived.
  • RuuviTag Open-Source Bluetooth Internet Of Things Sensor Beacon Hits Kickstarter (video)
  • Retro gaming on open source 2048 console
    Retro gaming in the open source vein could be on the upswing this season. Creoqode is the London-based technology design company behind 2048, the DIY game console with retro-style video games and visuals that is also supposed to help users learn coding.